Overcoming geny perspective

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my presentation at EDEN conference 2012 in Porto

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Overcoming geny perspective

  1. 1. Emanuele Rapetti Lorenzo Cantoni
  2. 2. Agenda 1. Minding the gap 2. 3 views 1. Enthusiasts “the question”: 2. 3. Concerned ones Critics are they different? 3. Empirical data 4. Conclusion 5. Overcoming the gap Let’s start… MINDING THE GAP Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  3. 3. Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH)@ EDEN2012
  4. 4. The problem in theory• Three views populate a controversial debate: – Enthusiasts About the idea that it – Concerned ones exists a generation of – Critics digital(ised ) learners Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  5. 5. Three samples There is one thing you know for sure: these kids are different. They study, work, write, and interact with each other in ways that are very different from the way you did growing up. They read blogs rather than newspapers. They often meet each other online before they meet in person. […] They`re more likely to send an instant message The enthusiast (IM) than to pick up the telephone to arrange a date later in the afternoon. […]. And they`re connected to one another by a common culture. Major aspects of their lives – social interactions, friendships, civic activities – are mediated by digital technologies. And they`ve never known another way of life. (Veen, 2006) Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  6. 6. […] hyper-networked kids who canThree samples track each other’ every move with ease, but are largely ignorant of history, economics, culture, and other subjects [… And the fault comes exactly from ICTs usages:] for digital immigrants, people who are 40 years old who spent The concerned one their college time in the library acquiring information, the Internet is really a miraculous source of knowledge. Digital natives, however, go to the Internet not to store knowledge in their minds, but to retrieve material and pass it along. The internet is just a delivery system (Bauerlein, 2008). Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  7. 7. A pletora of labelsBoomer babies; Boomlets; Born digital; Digital kids; DigitalNatives; Digital residents; Echo Boom; Gamers; Gen.com;Generation Next; Generation Tech; Generation Why; GenerationXX; Generation Y; Generation 2000; Grasshopper Minds;Homo Zappiens; Instant-Message Generation; Millennials; Netgeneration; Net-agers; Next Great Generation; NintendoGeneration; Prozac Generation; Screen Generation; Coddled,adrift, and slackers; Dumbest generation; Narcissist; Netaddicted (to pointless activities); Shameless; The ones who click(instead of thinking); The ones who take Google as Gospel;Violent; online ullies… Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  8. 8. Three samples they make grand claims about the difference between the millennial generation and all previous generations and they argue that this difference has huge implications for education. But most significantly, these claims are made with reference to almost no The critic empirical data. For the most part, they rely on anecdotal observations or speculation. In the rare cases, where there is hard data, it is usually not representative (Bullen, et al., 2009). Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  9. 9. Implications in…• Pedagogy (theory of Education)• Didactics and instructional design• Sociological approaches• Anthropology …depending to the focus implied by the chosen label Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  10. 10. LoDELearners of Digital Era Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  11. 11. Listening to LoDE• Our research was meant to explore which assumptions concerning LoDE are observable – 562 questionnaires random selected – Answered by university students – of Ticino university institutions (italian speaking canton of Switzerland) – (+ qualitative part) • Statistical treatment – (crosstabulation + Pearson’s –chi-square procedure) Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  12. 12. AGE variable detailsMEAN: 24.5 years;MEDIAN: 23 years;MIN: 17, MAX:75.The whole was divided into three “age groups”:• 17 to 23 years (58.5% of the sample),• from 24 to 29 (28.1%)• 30 and over (13.3%). This is primarily aiming to highlight any possible differences between LoDE belonging to Gen Y – namely, born after 1980 – and the others, who had in 2009, more than 30 years Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  13. 13. Crosstabs + Pearson’s Chi-square values procedure• Crosstabs procedure: questions relevant for digital learning * “age classes”.• 81 tabs were analysed• applying Pearson’s Chi-Square to check the assumed relationship;• while to determine its nature Cramer’s V value (converted in %) was used.• Such a procedure makes it possible to answer the question: does Age make any statistically relevant difference?• Out of 81 crossings, Pearson’s values resulted significant in 8 cases, meaning “age classes” variable was proofed to have a statistical influence.• Nonetheless, this influence is interesting only in two cases (highlighted in bold in the following three tables). Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  14. 14. Question 4.4: “how much ICTs improved…” The fact of ...increases ...the likelihood to consider that ICTsbeing older... of... improved significantly... “the way you practice your hobby or 0.8% interests” 0.5% “the way you do your students’ tasks” 0.1% “the way you learn” “the way you collaborate with your 3.9% peer” Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  15. 15. question 5.2:“Which is your favourite strategy to learn?” The fact of ...increases ...the likelihood to be morebeing older... of... in favour of... 0.2% “lectures in classroom” “printed 0.6% dictionary/encyclopaedia” “online platforms 0.3% (eLearning)” Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  16. 16. Question 8.1:“how much do you agree…?” The fact of ...increases ...the likelihood to answer that...being older... of... “It would be good if there were 4.0% more eLearning in my courses” Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  17. 17. Question 4.4:“how much ICTs improved…”• The way you practice your hobby or interests,• The way you do your students tasks,• The way you learn,• The way you have relationships with your friends or your family,• The way you share your ideas or creations,• The way you collaborate with your peers.ANSWERS: a lot, fairly, a little, not at all Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  18. 18. question 5.2:“Which is your favourite strategy to learn?”• Lectures in classroom,• Individual study,• Individual lesson,• Printed dictionary/encyclopaedia,• Multimedia supports,• Online platform (eLearning),• Search engines,• Websites/specialized blogs,• Social networking sites,• Wikipedia.ANSWERS: a lot, fairly, a little, not at all Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  19. 19. Question 8.1: “how much do you agree…?”• eLearning is an important element of my courses,• Without eLearning I would be unable to study,• eLearning is one of a number of important components of my courses,• eLearning makes courses more enjoyable,• My university is not very smart in the way it uses eLearning,• With eLearning I interact more with other students,• I find difficult to use a computer,• I find difficult to use technological devices (e.g. Pda/mobile phone/mp3 player),• Having access to a computer connected to the internet is a problem for me,• eLearning makes learning easier for me,• It would be good if there were more eLearning in my courseANSWERS: a lot, fairly, a little, not at all Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  20. 20. Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH)@ EDEN2012
  21. 21. conclusion• According to our sample... – ... the fact of being younger is not a good variable to identify people appreciating ICTs in learning – ... rather, in some cases, reality is opposite than expected – ... generally speaking, LoDE even seem to like more “classical” strategies (instead than ICTs) in learning Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  22. 22. Overcoming the gap… Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  23. 23. References• BAUERLEIN, M. (2008). The dumbest generation: How the digital age stupefies young americans and jeopardizes our future (or, dont trust anyone under 30). London: Penguin Books.• BULLEN, M., MORGAN, T., BELFER, K., & QAYYUM, A. (2009). The net generation in higher education: Rhetoric and reality. International Journal of Excellence in E-Learning, 2(1)• VEEN, W. (2006).In Vrakking B. (Ed.), Homo zappiens. Growing up in a digital age. London: Network Continuum Education.• Webpage: http://www.usi.ch/personal-info?id=1600 Emanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH) @ EDEN2012
  24. 24. emanuele.rapetti@usi.chEmanuele Rapetti – NewMinELab – USI Lugano (CH)@ EDEN2012

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