Media Literacy for Teaching English

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This is the presentation used for a workshop at John Cabot University in Rome. The aim of the workshop is professional development for Italian teachers of English literature.

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Media Literacy for Teaching English

  1. 1. Media  Literacy   for  Teaching  English     Antonio  López   John  Cabot  University   July  8,  2014    
  2. 2. Agenda:     Brief  introducGon   Defining  Media  Literacy   Media  Literacy  Techniques   Media  Literacy  and  Teaching  English  
  3. 3. What  is  the  difference   between  “literature”  and   “media”?    
  4. 4. What  is  literacy?  
  5. 5. Media  Literacy:  Defined  variously  as   learning  to  access,  evaluate  and  produce   media  in  a  variety  of  formats.       Literacy:  “the  sharing  of  meaning  through   symbols  in  order  to  fully  parGcipate  in   society”       (hTp://www.knightcomm.org/digital-­‐and-­‐media-­‐literacy/the-­‐heritage-­‐of-­‐ digital-­‐and-­‐media-­‐literacy/)        
  6. 6. Major  OrientaGons  
  7. 7.   Types  of  media  literacy:     Using:  Computer  use/ICT  skills,  workforce  development     Teaching  with:  Technology  integraGon,  digital  learning,   online  reading     Authorship:  MulGmedia  composiGon     Teaching  about:  InformaGon  literacy,  media  literacy,   internet  safety,  social  responsibility     Source:   h*p://www.slideshare.net/reneehobbs/the-­‐globaliza:on-­‐ of-­‐digital-­‐literacy        
  8. 8. Media  and  InformaGon  Literacy  (UNESCO)  
  9. 9. Doing  Media  Lit:   • Access   • Map   • Ask   • Evaluate     • Synthesize   • Communicate  
  10. 10. Media   Object   Text   Audience/User/   parGcipant   Material  CondiGons   Producer   Worldview   Environment   Culture   Economy  
  11. 11. Text   Audience/User/   parGcipant   Material     CondiGons   Producer   What  is  its  format?   What  do  you  see/hear?   What  is  the  story?   Is  it  fact,  opinion,  or  something  else?   How  is  it  told?   What  symbolic  resources  does  it  use?   What  techniques  are  used?   What’s  leb  out  of  the  story?   How  does  the  lifestyle  &  values  of     the  M.O.  orient  to:   •  Your  worldview   •  Family  experience   •  Ethnic/cultural  idenGty   •  Social  status?   What  emoGons  does  it  generate?   Does  this  benefit  or  harm  anyone?   What  could  you  do  to  respond?   How  was  it  made?   What  are  the  medium’s  properGes?   What  is  it  comprised  of?   Where  did  it  come  from?   How  does  it  impact  the  environment?   Who  paid  for  it?   How  was  it  distributed?   Why  was  it  produced?   Who  is  being  targeted?  Why?   What  is  the  goal(s)  of  the  producer?   What  kind  of  organizaGon     (corporate,  for  profit,  nonprofit,  government,     public,  individual,  social  network)?   Media   Object   (M.O.)  
  12. 12. hTp://youtu.be/dnLQnTOCF6w   Warm-­‐up  Gps:       What  messages  do  you  see?   What  did  you  feel  while  you  watched  it?     what  symbols  do  you  see?     What  camera  angles  are  used?    
  13. 13. ProducGon,  literary,  and  format  issues:     Novels  and  graphic  novels     Poems  and  music  videos   Short  stories  and  TV  shows/film   Music  vs.  music  video   Poem  read  vs.  poem  heard      
  14. 14. Content  Areas:     RL  –  Reading  literature     RI  –  Reading  informaGon     W  –  WriGng   SL  –  Speaking  and  Listening     L  –  Language     hTp://namle.net/wp-­‐content/uploads/2013/12/NAMLEMLECCSSGUIDE.pdf   Common  Core  State  Standards   English  Language  Arts  
  15. 15. Connec9on  #1:  Imagine  students  as   authors  of  different  types  of  media   messages  —  how  might  their  wriGng   style,  purpose,  point  of  view,  or  use  of   evidence  shib  if  they  were  wriGng  a  blog   post  versus  an  academic  essay?  A  leTer   to  the  editor  versus  a  “tweet”?   hTp://namle.net/wp-­‐content/uploads/2013/12/NAMLEMLECCSSGUIDE.pdf    
  16. 16. Connec9on  #2:  When  we  expand  our   definiGon  of  texts  to  the  variety  of   media  that  we  use  in  our  everyday   lives,  we  broaden  the  materials  and   concepts  we  have  at  our  disposal  in   the  classroom,  increase  student   engagement,  and  enrich  learning   experiences.   h"p://namle.net/wp.content/uploads/2013/12/NAMLEMLECCSSGUIDE.pdfD D
  17. 17. Connec9on  #3:  Strategies  include   asking  quesGons  to  assess  credibility   —where  do  sources  come  from?  Who   made  them  and  why?  Are  they   intended  to  entertain,  inform,  or   persuade?  And  if  so,  whom  are  they   trying  to  reach?   h"p://namle.net/wp.content/uploads/2013/12/NAMLEMLECCSSGUIDE.pdfD D
  18. 18. Connec9on  #4:  When  students  make   media  of  their  own,  whether  it’s   through  filmmaking,  graphic  design,   web  design,  or  some  other  form  of   media  producGon,  they  connect   professional  media  pracGces  to  their   own  opinions,  ideas,  quesGons,  and   values.   h"p://namle.net/wp.content/uploads/2013/12/NAMLEMLECCSSGUIDE.pdfD
  19. 19. Connec9on  #5:  By  reflecGng  on   their  own  values  and  understanding   the  values  of  different  disciplines,   cultures,  and  points  of  view,   students  are  beTer  able  to   communicate  thoughoully  with   others  who  may  be  different  from   them.   h"p://namle.net/wp.content/uploads/2013/12/NAMLEMLECCSSGUIDE.pdfD
  20. 20. Ciao!     Antonio  López     Email:     alopez@johncabot.edu     Workshop  website:     hTp://www.openmediaeducaGon.net/ medialit-­‐english/  

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