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Cn 9 th14_ngo_growi_symbiosis_in_drylands_werfftenbosch

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Cn 9 th14_ngo_growi_symbiosis_in_drylands_werfftenbosch

  1. 1. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Growing symbiosis in drylands: sharing lessons from scientist- NGO collaboration in DESIRE Marie José van der Werff ten Bosch, Both ENDS, the Netherlands October 14th , 2010 LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010
  2. 2. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Outline 1. Why should scientists and NGOs collaborate? 2. Lessons learned on scientist-NGO collaboration in DESIRE 3. The way forward: towards more and rewarding scientist-NGO collaboration
  3. 3. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Why scientist-NGO collaboration? “Know-why” coupled with “know-how” generates holistic, reliable and pragmatic knowledge able to guide policy makers and assist those people living with the challenges of desertification.
  4. 4. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Why scientist-NGO collaboration? NGOs can help to apply scientific results: • Benefit for society • Wider recognition for researchers • Research becomes more feasible, acceptable and meaningful (“reality check” of theoretical systems and models) NGOs can help to complete the list of factors influencing research results, such as: • different interests that determine land use options • enabling and obstructing rules and regulations
  5. 5. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Why scientist-NGO collaboration? Researchers can provide NGOs with high quality in-depth research based on non- political facts to provide a solid foundation for argumentation (“credibility”). Political and public opinions steer funding priorities, putting SLM jointly on the political and public agenda will enhance funding opportunities for both.
  6. 6. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 NGOs can be helpful in finding the open doors and transmitting the information to government levels when the right position is needed besides good information. Why scientist-NGO collaboration? Approaching the media together.
  7. 7. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Lessons learned in DESIRE Communication is key as we speak “different languages” • Perceptions • Prejudices • Expectations Different ways of working: in-depth vs. overall integration Different pace and time frames: • involved in long-term policy processes • needing argumentation right away when opportunity arises • research and verification needs time • Impatience to present results to policy makers
  8. 8. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Different focus caused by different motivations (not only between scientists and NGOs!): • more knowledge • a better environment • Recognition • helping the poor • improving your position Lessons learned in DESIRE
  9. 9. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 All the scientific output is sometimes difficult to grasp for the NGO that has to translate it: • “Go-between scientists” can point out specific scientific output they think is worthwhile “translating” for non-scientific audiences • Synthesising becomes essential Lessons learned in DESIRE
  10. 10. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Lessons learned in DESIRE Cross-fertilisation depends on the will and the initiatives of individuals, if there is a will there is a way!
  11. 11. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 The way forward More structured efforts are needed to facilitate and encourage both groups to work more closely together, such as project and programme designs that can accommodate both groups. The scientific system itself should evolve so it sees more rewards for other kinds of products and impacts, rather than focusing so narrowly on scientific publications and theoretical advances.
  12. 12. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Communication activities and budgets should be integrated in research-development processes from the beginning, to give NGOs space in research projects for linking towards other stakeholders. NGOs should be involved in research-development processes and project designs from the beginning, or the other way around. The way forward
  13. 13. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Work as partners recognising each others’ valuable and unique contribution Differences should be celebrated rather than get us irritated. The way forward
  14. 14. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Be patient, talk often to avoid misunderstandings and frustrations, check regularly to see if you are on the same track still. The way forward
  15. 15. LANDCON 1010, Xi’an, China, October 2010 Thank you! Input to this presentation: Patrice Burger, Maude Gentit – CARI France Dr Lindsay Stringer – University of Leeds, UK More information: mjb@bothends.org www.desire-his.eu

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