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Outside-In, Inside-Out: Designing Services Within Learning Spaces

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ELI Fall Focus Session 10/29/14

Published in: Design

Outside-In, Inside-Out: Designing Services Within Learning Spaces

  1. 1. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 1 Outside-in, Inside-out Designing Services within Learning Spaces ELI Fall Focus Session October 29, 2014
  2. 2. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 2 agenda Introduction Making the case Tools to get started: •  Understanding Experiences •  Partnership Models •  Defining Service Levels •  Guiding Referrals Wrap-up
  3. 3. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 3 a learning space… NC State Hunt Library (Design: Snøhetta and PBC+L)
  4. 4. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 4 services within a learning space… room reservation device lending research assistance tech support wayfinding furniture setup / reset cleaning subject-matter consultation NC State Hunt Library (Design: Snøhetta and PBC+L) community engagement
  5. 5. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 5 big idea: outside-in, inside-out Experiences – and the spaces, services and organizational structures that support them – should be designed from the outside in, as well as from the inside out. users
  6. 6. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 6 why outside-in?
  7. 7. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 7 80%of firms believe they’re delivering a “superior experience” to customers Source: “Closing the Delivery Gap: How to achieve true customer-led growth,” October 5, 2005; Bain & Company today, more organizations than ever are focusing on user experience…
  8. 8. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 8 80%of firms believe they’re delivering a “superior experience” to customers 8%of customers say they’re really delivering but their users aren’t satisfied. delivery gap Source: “Closing the Delivery Gap: How to achieve true customer-led growth,” October 5, 2005; Bain & Company
  9. 9. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 9 why inside-out?
  10. 10. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 10 72%of highly engaged employees believe they can positively affect customer service 27%of disengaged employees engaged employees can provide improved service… Source: “The Ten C’s of Employee Engagement,” Dan Crim and Gerard Sejits, The Workplace, Apr 2006 vs.
  11. 11. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 11 29% of staff are engaged or highly engaged at work but few employees are truly engaged. Source: Gallup Management Journal, Employment Engagement Index 55% are NOT engaged 16% are actively disengaged
  12. 12. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 12 some tools to get you started thinking about users and staff together… Understanding Experience Partnership Models Defining Service Levels Guiding Referrals
  13. 13. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 13 understanding experiences Consider the entire experience (all 5 E’s), from the user perspective as well as the the staff activities and interactions required throughout. Both user and staff journeys can be mapped using the 5Es to understand and improve them. ENTICE ENTER ENGAGE EXIT EXTEND Note: Es Framework developed by Conifer Research
  14. 14. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 14 understanding experiences brightspot and GT staff conducted observations and shadowing to evaluate how current services support / do not support users and/or staff and activities.
  15. 15. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 15 experience model outcomes discovering focusingshowcasing creating growing discovering discovering focusing focusingshowcasing showcasing creating creatinggrowing growing Experience models, created by synthesizing research data, can help to identify key moments in experiences as well as opportunities to better support them. DISCOVERING Finding the right information, content, people, and tools FOCUSING Filtering information and identifying what’s next GROWING Mastering new skills and building relationships CREATING Expressing and applying ideas SHOWCASING Testing and sharing back with the community Outcomes included: •  Identifying an opportunity to better showcase and share work •  Service strategies to encourage users to engage with experts earlier •  Staff sub-groups to create new services that support key moments
  16. 16. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 16 partnership models As service delivery becomes more complex and collaborative, often understanding with whom and how to partner is the most critical step. ? COLLABORATIVE Campus partners provide complementary services in an integrated manner. Could include library services as well. STOREFRONT Key service point is in the SATELLITE Dedicated space in the Library for ? ? ? ? VISITING Scheduled hours in the Library in space shared with other partners or users ? scale of dedicated space organizationdistinctintegratedwithlibrary none high CO-LOCATED spaces are located in the Library, but partners remain separate organizationally EMBEDDED All partner spaces are located in the library and retain a distinct identity, but staff are integrated organizationally within the library.
  17. 17. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 17 partnership model example
  18. 18. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 18 partnership model outcomes Defining whom to partner with and how to do so can create a set of shared expectations, a shared vocabulary, and a framework for estimating future space needs, future staffing, and further discussions of roles, skills, and training. Outcomes included: •  Common language about the different ways to work together •  Shared expectations for who will do what •  Forecast future needs for space and staffing •  Identification of further organizational development work (e.g., integration, culture, skills training)
  19. 19. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 19 service levels Service levels can be used to group and describe service experiences, helping to define how, when, where and by whom services are delivered. Level 3: Specialized support Level 2: Intermediate support Level 1: General support
  20. 20. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 20 mapping service levels Through interviews, workshops, and data analysis we created service levels to coordinate across providers and inform service delivery & communication. Transport Reservation & Booking Reception & Navigation Room Set-up Technology Support Catering Level 1: "You’re on your own" Online tool Online tool None None In-room guides, Phone Support None Level 2: "We'll get you started" Online tool Online tool None None Remote multi-media support Upon request Level 3: ”We’ll help you along the way" Phone Support Phone Support Welcome and Direct Advance Set-up On-demand Team, on- site Set-up, with On-demand Team Level 4: "We'll do it for you" Door-to- Door Service Dedicated Line Guide you there Advance Set-up, Check-in, and Adjust Dedicated team, on- site Set-up, with dedicated team Financial Services Company
  21. 21. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 21 service levels outcomes Clarifying service levels through a participatory and data-driven process can help manage expectations, provide for more consistent delivery, and uncover key success metrics. Financial Services Company Outcomes included: •  Clarity across service levels and clear rationale of “on own” > “I’ll get you started” > “I’ll help you along the way” > “I’ll do it for you” •  Better management of user expectations •  Identified questions to answer through service blueprinting •  Led to identification of success metrics like self- service uptake
  22. 22. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 22 referral models Consider the experience customers will have when being referred to different service providers, and create models to guide staff actions behind the scenes.
  23. 23. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 23 Brightspot worked with NYU to to create referral models and best practices for staff who support faculty teaching with technology at the University guiding referrals
  24. 24. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 24 referral model outcomes Referral models helped NYU create best practices for referrals and determined the resources and awareness needed for staff to successfully refer faculty. Outcomes included: •  an understanding of what staff needed to know, versus the resources they needed accessible for referrals •  better awareness of other staff provider groups across campus •  short, memorable phrases outlining referral best practices in all situations •  a guide to describe typical referral types
  25. 25. Eli Fall Focus Session 2014 25 remember… outside-in & inside-out
  26. 26. thank you! elliot@brightspotstrategy.com @brightspotter www.brightspotstrategy.com

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