Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

First day of reading lesson plan

1,287 views

Published on

Start your independent reading routines off right with this easy lesson! Download for proper formatting.
Link to the full set of reading journal plans: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Start-the-Reading-Year-Beginning-of-the-Year-Lesson-Plans-for-Reading-146737

Published in: Education
  • Fact: Penis Enlargement CAN Work. Here's How. ▲▲▲ https://tinyurl.com/yy3nfggr
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Get Your Ex Back Today Relationship expert Justin Sinclair shows you how with 3 easy steps. ■■■ http://ishbv.com/exback123/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

First day of reading lesson plan

  1. 1. Emily Kissner 2018 For classroom use only Lesson Plan: Meet and Greet Goal: Students will get to know the other students in the class by participating in a “meet and greet” activity. What you will need -Reading Meet and Greet page for each student (pages 16 and 17. Choose which version would work best for your students.) -Chart paper -Selection of the best high-interest books from your classroom library shelves (I always include lots of nonfiction.) At the start of the lesson This is a good lesson for the very first day of reading class. The goal is to get students talking to each other, focused on literacy, and reading books. 1. As students enter, hand out the Reading Meet and Greet page with minimal comments. Encourage students to read the directions and circulate around the room. Help out anyone who seems stuck. 2. Set a timer for five minutes. At the end of the time, gather the students together. What did they learn about one another? Keep this discussion brief and upbeat. 3. Have students circle three items on the list that they have done. Then, pair up students to talk about those items in- depth with a partner. While students are doing this, put piles of high-interest books on desks or tables throughout the room. 4. Gather everyone back together to talk about what they learned. Make a chart: “What we know about our reading class” Encourage students to share comments about what other students have read or done.
  2. 2. Emily Kissner 2018 For classroom use only 5. Tell students, “Now, the most important part of reading class is reading! You’ve probably noticed that I have books all over the room. Who already sees a book that interests them?” If more than 10 kids raise their hands, you’re in good shape for the year! If 10 kids have brought their own books from home, you have a dream class! 6. “Before we start reading time, let’s look at some rules.” Give kids basic rules for reading time. Later, we’ll put together a more developed set of rules. This is just to get us started. My basic rules are: Sit in a just-right spot, Focus on the book, and Stay quiet. Usually students will generate these rules on their own. 7. Once rules are done, send the kids who know what book they want away to get them and settle down somewhere in the classroom. I do quick book talks for everyone else. Usually, I can whittle down the group to 5 holdouts pretty quickly. I give these picky kids some extra attention to help them find a book they can live with, with the added advice: “This may not be your favorite book ever. We’re just trying things out today.” I have lots of easy picture books and even wordless books available for these kids. The key for this first day is to give everyone a positive experience! 8. Silence. You might manage to get 10 minutes of sustained reading time. Don’t let it go too long, and be sure to circulate to keep everyone reading. (You will probably have some students who wish to exchange books in this time. This is fine!) 9. Gather the students back together to talk about their books. Who found a book they want to keep reading? Who wants to keep browsing? a. I don’t let kids take books from my classroom library home in the first week of school. Instead, we have
  3. 3. Emily Kissner 2018 For classroom use only book for “Still Reading” and students mark their books with sticky notes on the cover. 10. Closure: Go back to the list of “What we know about our reading class.” What can we add? What are we looking forward to doing together? Find the full lesson: Start the Reading Year Reading Meet and Greet Learn about your classmates! Find a person who has done each one of the items below. Have that person write their initials on the line. See how many boxes you can get filled in before time is up. Has read a mystery book _________ Has used a recipe to make something _________ Visited the library over the summer ________ Has read a menu at a restaurant ________ Has read a fantasy book _________ Has read a book aloud to a younger child ________ Has read a nonfiction book about animals ________ Has used a map to get somewhere _________ Has read a book AND seen the movie version ________
  4. 4. Emily Kissner 2018 For classroom use only Has followed directions from the Internet ________ Has learned how to play a game by reading directions _______ Has read a historical fiction book ________ Has read a biography ________ Has looked up the meaning of a word _________ Can name a favorite author ________ Has read all of the books in a series ________ Has used the guide feature on the TV _________ Has used directions to put something together ________
  5. 5. Emily Kissner 2018 For classroom use only Reading Meet and Greet Learn about your classmates!  Read each box below.  Find someone who can answer “Yes!” to each box.  Ask that person to write their initials in the box. Visited the library over the summer _________________________ Has used a recipe to make something _________________________ Has read a menu at a restaurant _________________________ Has read a book aloud to a younger child _________________________ Has read a nonfiction book about animals _________________________ Has used the guide feature on the TV _________________________ Has read a book AND seen the movie version _________________________ Has looked up the meaning of a word _________________________
  6. 6. Emily Kissner 2018 For classroom use only Has learned how to play a game by reading directions _________________________ Has used directions to put something together _________________________

×