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Getting Kids Talking About Words and Books:
Exploring Vocabulary Instruction and Literature Circles
Chocowinity Primary, B...
Getting Comfortable Thinking and Talking About Words
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXGuCaApR7U
Embrace your inner nerd!
Make learning about words fun!
What research tells us:
Four components of an effective vocabulary
program:
1. extensive independent reading to expand wor...
What research tells us:
The words you use are powerful…
• You are a model of
language use and
vocabulary for your
students.
– What words do you us...
What you teach is powerful…
Considerations for Selecting Vocabulary Words (Fisher & Fry, 2008)
Representative
•Is the word...
How you teach is powerful…
Draw students’ attention to words as you read and teach.
1. Add information verbally or through...
Your turn!
Help students learn - AND USE –words
with new meanings…
Help students understand
relationships between words…
YOUR TURN!
Organize the words you just brainstormed OR try one of th...
Help students understand
relationships between words…
CONCEPT SORTS
Helping students analyze word parts…
• Explore the structure of words through WORD SORTS
Benefits:
• Active and hands-on
•...
Your Turn!
Activity #1:
Word Sort Example
Activity #2:
Greek/Latin Root Activity
Don’t forget the fun!
Patterns are important,
but remember that they
don’t ALWAYS work!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWN...
Word play builds engagement, fosters
word consciousness, and is FUN!
YOUR TURN!
Try your own “Woah, Baby!” word re-writes!...
Vocabulary Smore
https://www.smore.com/7gyf3-vocabulary-instruction
Teaching Vocabulary on Reading Rockets
http://www.read...
Literature Circles
1/3 of the teacher-identified
“successful” readers struggled
with comprehension
Direct
Comprehension
Strategies
Meaning-based
Discussion about
TextVs.
*Focusing on the content of
text through meaning-based
questions/discussion was
more effective than a
procedural comprehen...
Actively construct meaning from text as a
joint activity rather than one that is
transmitted from the teacher to the stude...
Keeping our Eye on the Prize
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlJJhP3frUQ&feat
ure=fvwrel
Getting Started with Talk
Let’s try it!
Scaffold with Roles
Discussion Director: acts as group’s facilitator; creates questions to increase
comprehension; asks wh...
Your Turn!
You’ve chosen a book/group with your post-its…
Within your group:
– Choose roles
– Talk about norms, expectatio...
What Did You Think?
High-interest books, span ability levels
Book talks
Students rank order books
Teacher build groups based on choice
(someti...
Make sure they can read their books
Meet with them more often to ensure they
are reading (comprehending) and ready
for the...
Key Ideas: Text Discussion to Enhance
Comprehension and Engagement
Teach kids how to read with purpose
Teach them how to n...
Getting Started With Lit Circles Lesson Plans:
http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-
resources/lesson-plans/literature-...
Wrap Up
Dr. Caitlin Ryan & Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty
Reading Education
East Carolina University
ryanca@ecu.edu
swaggertye@ecu.edu
Vocabulary and Literature Circles for CPS August 2014
Vocabulary and Literature Circles for CPS August 2014
Vocabulary and Literature Circles for CPS August 2014
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Vocabulary and Literature Circles for CPS August 2014

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Getting Kids Talking about Words and Books: Exploring Vocabulary Instruction and Literature Circles

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Vocabulary and Literature Circles for CPS August 2014

  1. 1. Getting Kids Talking About Words and Books: Exploring Vocabulary Instruction and Literature Circles Chocowinity Primary, Beaufort County -- August 4, 2014 Caitlin Ryan and Elizabeth Swaggerty, East Carolina University
  2. 2. Getting Comfortable Thinking and Talking About Words http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXGuCaApR7U
  3. 3. Embrace your inner nerd! Make learning about words fun!
  4. 4. What research tells us: Four components of an effective vocabulary program: 1. extensive independent reading to expand word knowledge [i.e., multiple words in multiple contexts] 2. instruction in specific words to enhance comprehension of texts containing those words 3. instruction in independent word-learning strategies, and 4. word consciousness and word-play activities to motivate and enhance learning (Graves, 2000)
  5. 5. What research tells us:
  6. 6. The words you use are powerful… • You are a model of language use and vocabulary for your students. – What words do you use? – What words could you use to scaffold their growing vocabularies? • It Works! – Kindergarten teacher example – Maya’s story – Others to share?
  7. 7. What you teach is powerful… Considerations for Selecting Vocabulary Words (Fisher & Fry, 2008) Representative •Is the word representative of a family of words that students should know? •Is the concept represented by the word critical to understanding the text? •Is the word a label for an idea that students need to know? •Does the word represent an idea essential for understanding another concept? Repeatability •Will the word be used again in this text? •If so, does the word occur often enough to be redundant? •Will the word be used again during the school year? Transportable •Will the word be used in group discussions? •Will the word be used in writing tasks? •Will the word be used in other content or subject areas? Contextual Analysis •Can students use context clues to determine the correct or intended meaning of the word without instruction? Structural Analysis •Can students use structural analysis to determine the correct or intended meaning of the word without instruction? Cognitive Load •Have I identified too many words for students to successfully integrate?
  8. 8. How you teach is powerful… Draw students’ attention to words as you read and teach. 1. Add information verbally or through gesture / voice inflection 2. Model how you use context clues when reading Digging Deeper with Types of Helpful Context Clues: Definition Synonym Antonym Example
  9. 9. Your turn!
  10. 10. Help students learn - AND USE –words with new meanings…
  11. 11. Help students understand relationships between words… YOUR TURN! Organize the words you just brainstormed OR try one of these: Frigid ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Scalding Repulsive--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Exquisite
  12. 12. Help students understand relationships between words… CONCEPT SORTS
  13. 13. Helping students analyze word parts… • Explore the structure of words through WORD SORTS Benefits: • Active and hands-on • Connects spelling & meaning • Helps students learn whole groups of words Examples: •Greek and Latin roots (intermediate •Prefixes and suffixes (all students)
  14. 14. Your Turn! Activity #1: Word Sort Example Activity #2: Greek/Latin Root Activity
  15. 15. Don’t forget the fun! Patterns are important, but remember that they don’t ALWAYS work! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWN9rTc08GU
  16. 16. Word play builds engagement, fosters word consciousness, and is FUN! YOUR TURN! Try your own “Woah, Baby!” word re-writes! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V97c_Vx-NFo A few examples……
  17. 17. Vocabulary Smore https://www.smore.com/7gyf3-vocabulary-instruction Teaching Vocabulary on Reading Rockets http://www.readingrockets.org/article/9943 Ideas from Edutopia http://www.edutopia.org/blog/vocabulary-instruction- teaching-tips-rebecca-alber Vocabulary Teaching Ideas on Pinterist http://www.pinterest.com/judyhelton/teaching- vocabulary/ Additional Resources
  18. 18. Literature Circles
  19. 19. 1/3 of the teacher-identified “successful” readers struggled with comprehension
  20. 20. Direct Comprehension Strategies Meaning-based Discussion about TextVs.
  21. 21. *Focusing on the content of text through meaning-based questions/discussion was more effective than a procedural comprehension strategies-based approach (McKeown, Beck, and Blake, 2009) *Can be effective methods to support engagement at all levels (Burns, 1998; Casey 2008/2009; Heller, 2006; Lloyd, 2004; Long & Gove, 2003; Swaggerty, 2009; Wiebe Berry & Englert, 2005)
  22. 22. Actively construct meaning from text as a joint activity rather than one that is transmitted from the teacher to the student. (Lee & Smagorinsky, 2000; McKeown, Beck, & Blake, 2009) Social Constructivist Literacy Learning
  23. 23. Keeping our Eye on the Prize https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlJJhP3frUQ&feat ure=fvwrel
  24. 24. Getting Started with Talk Let’s try it!
  25. 25. Scaffold with Roles Discussion Director: acts as group’s facilitator; creates questions to increase comprehension; asks who, what, why, when, where, how, and what if; open-ended questions that will stimulate discussion; focus on themes/big ideas Word Wizard: locates amazing/interesting words; looks for new words or words used in unusual ways; clarifies word meanings and pronunciations; uses research resource; points to the words in context Literary Luminator: locates examples of amazing/interesting writing that could be read aloud to the group; guides oral reading for a purpose; examines figurative language, parts of speech, and vivid descriptions Reporter: prepares a summary of the book or selected reading; highlights the important details, events, and characters. Connector: makes text-to-self, text-to-world, and text-to-text connections; makes connections to what you’re studying; make disconnections.
  26. 26. Your Turn! You’ve chosen a book/group with your post-its… Within your group: – Choose roles – Talk about norms, expectations for high-quality talk – Read • Read with your role in mind • Use post-its • Fill out role sheet
  27. 27. What Did You Think?
  28. 28. High-interest books, span ability levels Book talks Students rank order books Teacher build groups based on choice (sometimes ability) Planning Literature Circles
  29. 29. Make sure they can read their books Meet with them more often to ensure they are reading (comprehending) and ready for the discussion Provide extra opportunities to ask questions Make sure they feel success with reading Keep them excited and motivated Extra Support for Students Who Find Reading Difficult
  30. 30. Key Ideas: Text Discussion to Enhance Comprehension and Engagement Teach kids how to read with purpose Teach them how to notice, note, and question text that is interesting, confusing, and complex Teach kids how to talk about text Teach them how to compose good questions, questions that invite discussion Teach kids how to be in a group Teach them how to listen to and learn from one another
  31. 31. Getting Started With Lit Circles Lesson Plans: http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom- resources/lesson-plans/literature-circles-getting- started-19.html Talking about Text Website: http://talkingabouttext.weebly.com/ Text Discussion Resources
  32. 32. Wrap Up
  33. 33. Dr. Caitlin Ryan & Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty Reading Education East Carolina University ryanca@ecu.edu swaggertye@ecu.edu

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