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Annotated 
Bibliographies 
Liz Johns 
Librarian for Education 
emjohns@jhu.edu
Liz Johns 
emjohns@jhu.edu 
Office hours and more resources: 
guides.library.jhu.edu/emjohns 
Your Librarians
Sara Oestriech 
soestre1@jhu.edu 
Your Librarians
Today… 
Annotated Bibliographies…what are they 
and how do I make one? 
Including Expectations of Your Assignment 
Exam...
A list of citations on a particular topic followed by an 
evaluation of the source’s argument and other relevant 
material...
A summary and/or evaluation of each 
source in your bibliography.
STEPS TO CREATING AN ANNOTATED 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Find Your 
Sources 
Read your 
Sources 
Identify 
Most 
Relevant 
Sources 
C...
Step 1: Find your Sources 
• You should have most 
already from other 
assignments. 
• Start with the Research 
Guide for ...
Step 2: Read Your Sources
Step 3: Identify the Most 
Important Sources 
• Peer-reviewed articles only for this 
assignment. 
Talk to your professor...
Step 4: Cite your Sources 
APA Resources 
Refworks 
guides.library.jhu.edu/refworks 
Purdue Owl 
(Google it) 
APA Style Gu...
Step 5. Write your Annotations 
Write an annotation for each source. These 
annotations should be single-spaced and should...
Quick Poll: 
http://tinyurl.com/mmj342z
Session A
Session B
Parts of an Annotation 
1. Summary 
2. Evaluation 
3. Commentary or Reflection
Summary 
Highlight the 
main points or 
findings.
Summary: Paraphrase 
Use your own words, do not 
copy the abstract. 
Paraphrasing advice: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resou...
Evaluation 
• Authority of author 
• Strength of argument 
• Strength of author’s evidence/sources 
• Strength of author’s...
Evaluation: CRAAP Test 
Currency 
Relevance 
Authority 
Accuracy 
Purpose 
csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/eval_websites.pdf
Commentary/Reflection 
• Comment on the 
intended audience 
• How does this add to or 
inform other works you 
have cited?...
Questions?
Example A 
Davidson, Hilda Ellis. Roles of the Northern Goddess. 
London: Routledge, 1998. 
Davidson's book provides a tho...
Example B 
Bruckman, A. S. (1993). Gender swapping on the Internet. Proceedings of 
INET '93. Retrieved from 
http://www.c...
Example B 
Bruckman, A. S. (1993). Gender swapping on the Internet. Proceedings of 
INET '93. Retrieved from 
http://www.c...
Example C 
Starks, B. C., Harrison, L., & Denhardt, K. (2011). Outside the comfort zone of the 
classroom. Journal of Crim...
Example C 
Starks, B. C., Harrison, L., & Denhardt, K. (2011). Outside the comfort zone of the 
classroom. Journal of Crim...
Practice 
http://tinyurl.com/ke94sb4
Questions?
Step 6. Write Intro Essay 
• No more than 5 pgs., double spaced 
• Orients the reader to the bibliography 
Questions to an...
Annotated Bibliography 
Resources 
Purdue Owl: 
owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/01/ 
Cornell Library Guide: 
guide...
Purpose of an AB 
• Explore POP 
• Appraise issues or factors 
associated with your 
professional practice and 
POP. 
• He...
Remember… 
• You need 40 peer-reviewed sources. 
• You need to read, evaluate, cite, and annotate 
each of these sources. ...
Library Resources 
Your librarian: 
SOE Librarian: Liz Johns 
Office hours and more resources: 
guides.library.jhu.edu/emj...
Quick Poll: 
http://tinyurl.com/n2thm9k
Session A
Session B
Quick Poll: What will you do 
differently? 
http://bit.ly/dsplvq
Questions? 
Liz: emjohns@jhu.edu 
Sara: soestre1@jhu.edu
Annotated Bibliographies: Step by Step Guide
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Annotated Bibliographies: Step by Step Guide

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Go through the steps to creating an annotated bibliography. Originally designed for first-semester Ed.D. students.

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Annotated Bibliographies: Step by Step Guide

  1. 1. Annotated Bibliographies Liz Johns Librarian for Education emjohns@jhu.edu
  2. 2. Liz Johns emjohns@jhu.edu Office hours and more resources: guides.library.jhu.edu/emjohns Your Librarians
  3. 3. Sara Oestriech soestre1@jhu.edu Your Librarians
  4. 4. Today… Annotated Bibliographies…what are they and how do I make one? Including Expectations of Your Assignment Examples Practice Resources
  5. 5. A list of citations on a particular topic followed by an evaluation of the source’s argument and other relevant material including its intended audience, sources of evidence, and methodology.
  6. 6. A summary and/or evaluation of each source in your bibliography.
  7. 7. STEPS TO CREATING AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY Find Your Sources Read your Sources Identify Most Relevant Sources Cite Your Sources Write Annotations Write Intro Essay
  8. 8. Step 1: Find your Sources • You should have most already from other assignments. • Start with the Research Guide for Education: guides.library.jhu.edu/education • Struggling to find more? Set up a consultation with a librarian.
  9. 9. Step 2: Read Your Sources
  10. 10. Step 3: Identify the Most Important Sources • Peer-reviewed articles only for this assignment. Talk to your professor about exceptions. • Only use those most relevant for your research. If the source is not adding to the dialog of your POP, it is not appropriate to include.
  11. 11. Step 4: Cite your Sources APA Resources Refworks guides.library.jhu.edu/refworks Purdue Owl (Google it) APA Style Guide apastyle.org APA Blog blog.apastyle.org/apastyle
  12. 12. Step 5. Write your Annotations Write an annotation for each source. These annotations should be single-spaced and should include an overview of the study and succinctly evaluate the source’s argument, sources of evidence, methodology, and conclusions specifically focused on the underlying causes and factors associated with your POP and their relation to the POP. The annotation should also indicate the primary audience of the work and the constructs used.
  13. 13. Quick Poll: http://tinyurl.com/mmj342z
  14. 14. Session A
  15. 15. Session B
  16. 16. Parts of an Annotation 1. Summary 2. Evaluation 3. Commentary or Reflection
  17. 17. Summary Highlight the main points or findings.
  18. 18. Summary: Paraphrase Use your own words, do not copy the abstract. Paraphrasing advice: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/02/
  19. 19. Evaluation • Authority of author • Strength of argument • Strength of author’s evidence/sources • Strength of author’s methodology • Strength of author’s conclusions
  20. 20. Evaluation: CRAAP Test Currency Relevance Authority Accuracy Purpose csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/eval_websites.pdf
  21. 21. Commentary/Reflection • Comment on the intended audience • How does this add to or inform other works you have cited? • How does this add to or inform your POP?
  22. 22. Questions?
  23. 23. Example A Davidson, Hilda Ellis. Roles of the Northern Goddess. London: Routledge, 1998. Davidson's book provides a thorough examination of the major roles filled by the numerous pagan goddesses of Northern Europe in everyday life, including their roles in hunting, agriculture, domestic arts like weaving, the household, and death. The author discusses relevant archaeological evidence, patterns of symbol and ritual, and previous research. The book includes a number of black and white photographs of relevant artifacts.
  24. 24. Example B Bruckman, A. S. (1993). Gender swapping on the Internet. Proceedings of INET '93. Retrieved from http://www.cc.gatech.edu/elc/papers/bruckman/gender-swapping bruckman.pdf In this brief analysis, Bruckman investigates the perceptions of males and females in electronic environments. She argues that females (or those posing as females) receive an inordinate amount of unwanted sexual attention and offers of assistance from males. She also suggests that females (and sexually unthreatening males) are welcomed more willingly than dominant males into virtual communities. She concludes that behavior in electronic forums is an exaggerated reflection of gender stereotypes in real-life communication. The article cites other studies also included in this bibliography. The article is interesting and accessible, but it is quite old, and it relies almost entirely on quotations from four anonymous forum participants.
  25. 25. Example B Bruckman, A. S. (1993). Gender swapping on the Internet. Proceedings of INET '93. Retrieved from http://www.cc.gatech.edu/elc/papers/bruckman/gender-swapping bruckman.pdf In this brief analysis, Bruckman investigates the perceptions of males and females in electronic environments. She argues that females (or those posing as females) receive an inordinate amount of unwanted sexual attention and offers of assistance from males. She also suggests that females (and sexually unthreatening males) are welcomed more willingly than dominant males into virtual communities. She concludes that behavior in electronic forums is an exaggerated reflection of gender stereotypes in real-life communication. The article cites other studies also included in this bibliography. The article is interesting and accessible, but it is quite old, and it relies almost entirely on quotations from four anonymous forum participants.
  26. 26. Example C Starks, B. C., Harrison, L., & Denhardt, K. (2011). Outside the comfort zone of the classroom. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 22(2), 203-225. doi:10.1080/10511253.2010.517773 This paper explains how service learning can be a valuable part of a student’s academic career. Service can be tied into a course and takes students outside of the classroom for a non-traditional, active learning experience that can impact not only their education, but their personal and professional lives. Examples are provided for other teachers to encourage them to explore service learning projects in their own classrooms. The authors are practitioners who have used service projects to enhance their courses, and their experiences are also supported by previous research done on this topic. Their examples demonstrate that learning can be achieved in non-traditional ways, and service learning can have a larger impact that regular classroom study. Their argument for active learning is supported by many of the other articles in this bibliography, which stress that active learning is the most effective method for retaining life-long skills. The examples and background in this article describe how teaching and learning has changed over time, and provides important perspective and context to inform my POP.
  27. 27. Example C Starks, B. C., Harrison, L., & Denhardt, K. (2011). Outside the comfort zone of the classroom. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 22(2), 203-225. doi:10.1080/10511253.2010.517773 This paper explains how service learning can be a valuable part of a student’s academic career. Service can be tied into a course and takes students outside of the classroom for a non-traditional, active learning experience that can impact not only their education, but their personal and professional lives. Examples are provided for other teachers to encourage them to explore service learning projects in their own classrooms. The authors are practitioners who have used service projects to enhance their courses, and their experiences are also supported by previous research done on this topic. Their examples demonstrate that learning can be achieved in non-traditional ways, and service learning can have a larger impact that regular classroom study. Their argument for active learning is supported by many of the other articles in this bibliography, which stress that active learning is the most effective method for retaining life-long skills. The examples and background in this article describe how teaching and learning has changed over time, and provides important perspective and context to inform my POP.
  28. 28. Practice http://tinyurl.com/ke94sb4
  29. 29. Questions?
  30. 30. Step 6. Write Intro Essay • No more than 5 pgs., double spaced • Orients the reader to the bibliography Questions to answer in the essay: • How has the literature analyzed in the bibliography impacted your understanding of your POP? • What aspects of your POP does it illuminate? • What drivers of your POP does it push you to look at? • Which of these drivers are actionable?
  31. 31. Annotated Bibliography Resources Purdue Owl: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/01/ Cornell Library Guide: guides.library.cornell.edu/annotatedbibliography
  32. 32. Purpose of an AB • Explore POP • Appraise issues or factors associated with your professional practice and POP. • Help you get started with the literature review for your dissertation. • Think critically about your POP, and the literature
  33. 33. Remember… • You need 40 peer-reviewed sources. • You need to read, evaluate, cite, and annotate each of these sources. • These are the 40 most relevant sources, not the first 40 you’ve found, so… • You will need to find and read many more than just 40 sources.
  34. 34. Library Resources Your librarian: SOE Librarian: Liz Johns Office hours and more resources: guides.library.jhu.edu/emjohns Online Research Guides: Guide for Education guides.library.jhu.edu/education Library Research Modules: Your Orientation Checklist in the ELC RefWorks Guide: guides.library.jhu.edu/refworks Librarians on every campus: guides.library.jhu.edu/dcregional Annotated Bibliography Help: Purdue Owl: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/01/ Cornell Library Guide: guides.library.cornell.edu/annotatedbibliography Presentation Tools Workshop: Tuesday, Nov. 18 at 6pm. Register at tinyurl.com/nnho49m
  35. 35. Quick Poll: http://tinyurl.com/n2thm9k
  36. 36. Session A
  37. 37. Session B
  38. 38. Quick Poll: What will you do differently? http://bit.ly/dsplvq
  39. 39. Questions? Liz: emjohns@jhu.edu Sara: soestre1@jhu.edu

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