EYE @ ASME presentation

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A presentation of EYE and the mobility of Engineers in Europe

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  • Work permits are issued by Work Permits (UK), part of the Home Office's The UK Border Agency. A work permit relates to a specific person and a specific job. The work permit scheme lets UK employers recruit or transfer people from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), while still protecting the interests of resident workers in the UK. Work permits also allow overseas nationals to come to the UK for training or work experience. There are six types of work permit. Business and commercial. These allow UK employers to recruit people from outside the EEA who will fill a vacancy that the employer has not been able to fill with a resident worker. Sportspeople and entertainers These allow UK employers to employ established sportspeople, entertainers, cultural artists and some technical and support people from outside the EEA. GATS (Global Agreement on Trade in Services) This allows employees of companies that are based outside the European Union to work in the UK on a service contract awarded to their employer by a UK-based organisation. Sectors Based Scheme (SBS) From 1 January 2007, this scheme only allows workers from Romania and Bulgaria to enter the UK for up to 12 months to take low-skilled work in the food manufacturing industry. More details on this scheme are available from Work Permits (UK). (Contact details are under 'More advice and information' at the end of this guidance). Training and Work Experience Scheme (TWES) This scheme allows people from outside the EEA to carry out work-based training for a professional or specialist qualification, or a short period of work experience as an extra member of staff. To qualify for TWES, you must: hold a valid TWES work permit and be able to carry out the training or work experience it applies to intend to leave the UK after the training or work experience be aged over 16 not intend to take employment except as set out on the permit, and be able to support yourself and your dependants, without needing any help from public funds. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for more than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 24 months outside the UK. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for less than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 12 months outside the UK.
  • Work permits are issued by Work Permits (UK), part of the Home Office's The UK Border Agency. A work permit relates to a specific person and a specific job. The work permit scheme lets UK employers recruit or transfer people from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), while still protecting the interests of resident workers in the UK. Work permits also allow overseas nationals to come to the UK for training or work experience. There are six types of work permit. Business and commercial. These allow UK employers to recruit people from outside the EEA who will fill a vacancy that the employer has not been able to fill with a resident worker. Sportspeople and entertainers These allow UK employers to employ established sportspeople, entertainers, cultural artists and some technical and support people from outside the EEA. GATS (Global Agreement on Trade in Services) This allows employees of companies that are based outside the European Union to work in the UK on a service contract awarded to their employer by a UK-based organisation. Sectors Based Scheme (SBS) From 1 January 2007, this scheme only allows workers from Romania and Bulgaria to enter the UK for up to 12 months to take low-skilled work in the food manufacturing industry. More details on this scheme are available from Work Permits (UK). (Contact details are under 'More advice and information' at the end of this guidance). Training and Work Experience Scheme (TWES) This scheme allows people from outside the EEA to carry out work-based training for a professional or specialist qualification, or a short period of work experience as an extra member of staff. To qualify for TWES, you must: hold a valid TWES work permit and be able to carry out the training or work experience it applies to intend to leave the UK after the training or work experience be aged over 16 not intend to take employment except as set out on the permit, and be able to support yourself and your dependants, without needing any help from public funds. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for more than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 24 months outside the UK. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for less than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 12 months outside the UK.
  • Work permits are issued by Work Permits (UK), part of the Home Office's The UK Border Agency. A work permit relates to a specific person and a specific job. The work permit scheme lets UK employers recruit or transfer people from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), while still protecting the interests of resident workers in the UK. Work permits also allow overseas nationals to come to the UK for training or work experience. There are six types of work permit. Business and commercial. These allow UK employers to recruit people from outside the EEA who will fill a vacancy that the employer has not been able to fill with a resident worker. Sportspeople and entertainers These allow UK employers to employ established sportspeople, entertainers, cultural artists and some technical and support people from outside the EEA. GATS (Global Agreement on Trade in Services) This allows employees of companies that are based outside the European Union to work in the UK on a service contract awarded to their employer by a UK-based organisation. Sectors Based Scheme (SBS) From 1 January 2007, this scheme only allows workers from Romania and Bulgaria to enter the UK for up to 12 months to take low-skilled work in the food manufacturing industry. More details on this scheme are available from Work Permits (UK). (Contact details are under 'More advice and information' at the end of this guidance). Training and Work Experience Scheme (TWES) This scheme allows people from outside the EEA to carry out work-based training for a professional or specialist qualification, or a short period of work experience as an extra member of staff. To qualify for TWES, you must: hold a valid TWES work permit and be able to carry out the training or work experience it applies to intend to leave the UK after the training or work experience be aged over 16 not intend to take employment except as set out on the permit, and be able to support yourself and your dependants, without needing any help from public funds. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for more than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 24 months outside the UK. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for less than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 12 months outside the UK.
  • Work permits are issued by Work Permits (UK), part of the Home Office's The UK Border Agency. A work permit relates to a specific person and a specific job. The work permit scheme lets UK employers recruit or transfer people from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), while still protecting the interests of resident workers in the UK. Work permits also allow overseas nationals to come to the UK for training or work experience. There are six types of work permit. Business and commercial. These allow UK employers to recruit people from outside the EEA who will fill a vacancy that the employer has not been able to fill with a resident worker. Sportspeople and entertainers These allow UK employers to employ established sportspeople, entertainers, cultural artists and some technical and support people from outside the EEA. GATS (Global Agreement on Trade in Services) This allows employees of companies that are based outside the European Union to work in the UK on a service contract awarded to their employer by a UK-based organisation. Sectors Based Scheme (SBS) From 1 January 2007, this scheme only allows workers from Romania and Bulgaria to enter the UK for up to 12 months to take low-skilled work in the food manufacturing industry. More details on this scheme are available from Work Permits (UK). (Contact details are under 'More advice and information' at the end of this guidance). Training and Work Experience Scheme (TWES) This scheme allows people from outside the EEA to carry out work-based training for a professional or specialist qualification, or a short period of work experience as an extra member of staff. To qualify for TWES, you must: hold a valid TWES work permit and be able to carry out the training or work experience it applies to intend to leave the UK after the training or work experience be aged over 16 not intend to take employment except as set out on the permit, and be able to support yourself and your dependants, without needing any help from public funds. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for more than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 24 months outside the UK. If you have been in the UK on a TWES permit for less than 12 months, you will not normally be eligible for another TWES permit until you have spent 12 months outside the UK.
  • EYE @ ASME presentation

    1. 1. E uropean Y oung E ngineers Evert van Lieshout - SG Roger K McLaughlin - HSG Orlando, 17th Nov 2009 The Mobility of Engineers in Europe
    2. 2. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Introduction <ul><li>Intoduction to EYE </li></ul><ul><li>Working in Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Work Opportunities – Case Studie </li></ul><ul><li>Questions & Answers </li></ul>
    3. 3. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Intoduction to EYE “ Shaping Europe Together”
    4. 4. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) What is EYE? <ul><li>EYE is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Founded in 1994 by Dutch and Belgian Engineering associations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Today 19 organisations in 14 countries, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>representing 150.000 individuals, steadily growing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network of young engineering professionals and students via their respective national engineering association </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EYE is politically neutral and independent </li></ul>
    5. 5. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Who are EYE? 19 Organizations in 14 Countries, representing 150,000+ Members , steadily growing EYE is a Network of Young Engineers via their respective National Engineering Associations
    6. 6. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Who are EYE? <ul><li>EYE is a Network of Young Engineers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Upwardly mobile </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>44% have studied abroad </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Active in their industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>50% have worked abroad </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Young professionals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>31% Female delegates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivated to interact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% are planning to work abroad </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interested in achieving their potential </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Organisation … 19 Member Associations Young professionals and Students register KVIV (B) KIVI NIRIA (NL) VIK (B) VDI (D) IDA (DK) FNTS (BUL) … (…) Council Members (Association Representatives) EYE Council (Convenes at every conference) EYE conference 2 per year, 80-250 participants Taskforce (Working Group) elects Secretary General Deputy Secretary General President Regional Coordinator
    8. 8. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Core objectives <ul><li>What? </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Create a trans-European network </li></ul><ul><li>Foster mobility of engineers in Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Create a forum for the exchange of experience </li></ul><ul><li>How? </li></ul><ul><li>Defining common interests </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding each other </li></ul><ul><li>Helping each other </li></ul>
    9. 9. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Challenges and Ambitions <ul><li>Transferring knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li> Education of European Engineers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Representing and Promoting our common interest in Europe </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With the help of the VDI – Bureau Duesseldorf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>by our common voice at the national associations </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE Products & Tools <ul><li>EYE Contact </li></ul><ul><li>Up to six issues per year </li></ul><ul><li>Articles of interest to young professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Members contribute </li></ul><ul><li>Forum for your issues </li></ul><ul><li>Used to help EYE members promote their work to others </li></ul>
    11. 11. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE Products & Tools <ul><li>EYE Web Page </li></ul><ul><li>Communications portal </li></ul><ul><li>Information about past and future conferences </li></ul><ul><li>Profiles of Task Force members </li></ul><ul><li>Resources for all EYE members </li></ul><ul><li>www.e-y-e.eu </li></ul>
    12. 12. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE Products & Tools <ul><li>EYE conferences </li></ul><ul><li>two international conferences per year </li></ul><ul><li>each organized by a national association </li></ul><ul><li>workshops, company visits, plenary session, discussions </li></ul>
    13. 13. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE Products & Tools <ul><li>EYE conferences </li></ul><ul><li>cultural visits, official dinner </li></ul><ul><li>welcome party, pub crawl </li></ul><ul><li>Etc & etc… </li></ul>
    14. 14. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE Products & Tools <ul><li>EYE conferences </li></ul><ul><li>council and taskforce </li></ul><ul><li>meetings </li></ul><ul><li>transfer of presidency </li></ul>
    15. 15. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Shaping Europe Together www.e-y-e.eu
    16. 16. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE Products & Tools 2010: Glasgow & Italy (joint with ASME) 2009: Hasselt 2008: Copenhagen & Düsseldorf 2007: Malta & Enschede 2006: Salerno & Sofia 2005: Leuven & Cardiff 2004: Strasbourg & London 2003: Cologne & Helsinki 2002: The Hague & Bruges 2001: Paris & Copenhagen 2000: Helsinki & Hanover 1999: Utrecht & Brussels 1998: Budapest & London 1997: Karlsruhe & Copenhagen 1996: Rotterdam & Dublin 1995: Antwerp & Amsterdam
    17. 17. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EYE and ASME <ul><li>Cooperation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ASME Brussels office </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ASME joint Dusseldorf conference </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organisation of a joint conference in Italy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>But also the initiative to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write for each others publications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Present on each others conferences/congress </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Working in Europe Legislation and Framework
    19. 19. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) History of the European Union <ul><li>Timeline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1951 Treaty of Paris – six countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1992 EU founded, Maastricht Treaty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Charter of Fundamental Rights agreed in Dec 2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Treaty of Lisbon signed in Dec 2007 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Charter adapted in Dec 2007 to have same legal value as Treaty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Treaty adopted ratified 3 rd Nov 2009 by last of 27 member states </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expected to come into force Dec 2009 </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Treaty of Lisabon <ul><li>Key changes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>European Council President </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Single European Affairs Post </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Charter of Fundamental Rights </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More Powerful Parliament </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combating Climate Change-Explicit Objective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EU Public Prosecutor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central Bank – Official Status </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EU Charter of Fundamental Rights <ul><li>Key tenants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dignity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freedoms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Equality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Solidarity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Citizens Rights </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Justice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General Provisions </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EU Charter of Fundamental Rights <ul><li>Art. 15 Freedom to choose an occupation & right to engage in work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Right to engage in work and pursue a freely chosen or accepted occupation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom to seek employment, work and provide services in any member state </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nationals of third countries who are authorised to work in the territories of the Member States are entitled to working conditions equivalent to those of citizens of the union </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EU Charter of Fundamental Rights <ul><li>Art 16. Freedom to conduct a Business </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The freedom to conduct a business in accordance with Community law and national laws and practices is recognised. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) EU Charter of Fundamental Rights <ul><li>Art. 45 Freedom of movement and of residence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Every citizen of the Union has the right to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom of movement and residence may be granted, in accordance with the Treaty establishing the European Community, to nationals of third countries legally resident in the territory of a Member State </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current UK Legislation <ul><li>Visa points base entry system covering </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General Migrants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Investors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Entrepreneurs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Post-study Work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Skilled Worker </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Temporary Worker </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth Mobility Scheme (Not US) </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current UK Legislation <ul><li>Skilled Workers require </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Certificate of Sponsorship (50) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demonstrate Prospective Earnings (20) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level of Qualifications (15) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proof of sufficient funds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www. ukba . homeoffice . gov . uk </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current UK Legislation <ul><li>Work Permit Scheme </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Business and Commercial </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sports People and Entertainers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Global Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sector Based Scheme (SBS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training & Work Experience Scheme (TWES) </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current Dutch Legislation <ul><li>Resident permit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apply for a Resident permit: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a valid passport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no criminal record </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a sponsor or sufficient means of support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>you do not have tuberculosis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>you have a health insurance that covers you in the Netherlands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no need for a MVV (temporary entry permit) </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current Dutch Legislation <ul><li>Working Permit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>apply directly to companies yourself </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If a company wants to hire you, they will start the proces </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>this work permit is bound to the company </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>if you have a Dutch or EU partner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Your partner must be living and working in the Netherlands and be willing to sponsor you </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If the relationship should end or one of you should move out, the permit will no longer be valid. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Applying for a work permit may take up to 6 months </li></ul>
    30. 30. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current Dutch Legislation <ul><li>Policy for highly skilled migrants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a migrant coming to the Netherlands for the purpose of employment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>earning a minimum gross income of 49,087 euro, or 35,997 euro if under the age of 30 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the income criterion will not apply if the person involved takes up employment with an educational or research institute, or is a postgraduate student or university lecturer under the age of 30 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From 2008 graduates who finished their studies in the Netherlands can also obtain a workpermit as a &quot;kennismigrant&quot;. Their minimum yearly wage should be 25,800 euro to qualify for this rule. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Applying as highly skilled migrants may take within to 2 weeks </li></ul><ul><li>application costs (435, - euro) </li></ul>
    31. 31. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Current Dutch Legislation <ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>you need a work permit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>free of charge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dutch law restricts the numbers of hours you may work in the Netherlands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You must make a choice between: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Fulltime) seasonal work in the months of June, July and August or </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Part-time work throughout the year, but no more than 10 hours a week. </li></ul>
    32. 32. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Work Opportunities Case Study: United Kingdom
    33. 33. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Case Study: UK <ul><li>UK Economy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bank of England base interest rate 0.5% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CPI 1.1% - Target 2.0% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Retail Price Index -1.4% on year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantative Easing Asset Purchases £175bn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unemployment rate 7.9%, up 2.1% on year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturing jobs down 10% on year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Construction output down 15% on year </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Case Study: UK <ul><li>Growth Industries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nuclear – decommissioning & building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Environmental Technologies – energy, materials, transport, built environment, waste, water, recycling etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Major Infrastructure – Airports & Rail </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Declining industries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Real Estate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chems & Pharms </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Case Study: UK <ul><li>American Companies Working in UK & Europe </li></ul><ul><ul><li>URS / Washington Group / EG & G </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jacobs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parsons Brinckerhoff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AECOM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bechtel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Etc…. </li></ul></ul>
    36. 36. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Questions & Answers
    37. 37. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Thanks for your time! For more information … www.e-y-e.eu
    38. 38. European Young Engineers – ASME (11/17/2009) Video‘s Beware of the Monkeys http://www. youtube . com / watch ?v=77blar- qaTs T-shirt folding http://www. youtube . com / watch ?v= fZKKrUXjzDY Women with eals race in Belgium at EYE-Hasselt http://www. youtube . com / watch ?v=c_EFt8fytPY Djembe at EYE-Hasselt http://www. youtube . com / watch ?v=ORO- McpAnfs Engineers learning some bottle tricks http://www. youtube . com / watch ?v=M4YF542Uoo0

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