EVAN LEYBOURN 
EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM 
INTRO TO SCRUM 
PART 1: HISTORY & 
CORE CONCEPTS
Evan Leybourn 
Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author 
Melbourne, Australia 
@eleybourn 
http://theagiledirector.com
WHAT DOES BEING 
“AGILE” 
ACTUALLY MEAN? 
THE AGILE MANIFESTO
Waterfall 
Agile
Waterfall (Incrementing) 
Agile (Iterating) 
Images with thanks from Jeff Patton: http://www.agileproductdesign.com/
INDIVIDUALS AND 
INTERACTIONS 
OVER PROCESSES AND TOOLS
WORKING 
SOFTWARE 
OVER COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION
CUSTOMER 
COLLABORATION 
OVER CONTRACT NEGOTIATION
RESPONDING TO 
CHANGE 
OVER FOLLOWING A PLAN
1. Our highest priority is to satisfy 
the customer through early 
and continuous delivery of 
valuable software.
2. Welcome changing 
requirements, even late in 
development. Agile processes 
harness change for the 
customer's competit...
3. Deliver working software 
frequently, from a couple of 
weeks to a couple of months, 
with a preference to the shorter ...
4. Business people and 
developers must work together 
daily throughout the project.
5. Build projects around 
motivated individuals. Give 
them the environment and 
support they need, and trust 
them to get...
6. The most efficient and effective 
method of conveying 
information to and within a 
development team is face-to-face 
c...
7. Working software is the 
primary measure of progress.
8. Agile processes promote 
sustainable development. The 
sponsors, developers, and 
users should be able to 
maintain a c...
9. Continuous attention to 
technical excellence and good 
design enhances agility.
10.Simplicity--the art of 
maximizing the amount of work 
not done--is essential.
11.The best architectures, 
requirements, and designs 
emerge from self-organizing 
teams.
12.At regular intervals, the team 
reflects on how to become 
more effective, then tunes and 
adjusts its behaviour 
accor...
INSPECT ADAPT INSPECT 
HOW DOES 
“AGILE” 
WORK
WORKFLOW AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT 
AUP, CRYSTAL 
CLEAR, DSDM, 
KANBAN, RUP, 
SCRUM
SCRUM 
* Iterative Product Development 
* 1-4 week Sprints 
* Formal Roles (Product Owner & 
Scrum Master) 
* Timeboxed Me...
DEVELOPMENT METHODS 
BDD, FDD, RAD, 
LEAN SOFTWARE, 
XP
Extreme Programming 
Activities 
Writing the Software 
Testing the Software 
Listening to the Customer 
Designing & Refact...
QUALITY METHODS 
TEST DRIVEN 
DEVELOPMENT
Test-Driven Development 
1. Create a test 
2. Add the test to the test catalogue 
3. Write the code 
4. Run the tests (all...
1. AGILE MEANS NO 
DOCUMENTATION 
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
2. NOT MEASURING, 
MONITORING OR 
CORRECTING 
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 
3. ASSUMING YOU 
CAN DO MORE 
WITH LESS
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 
4. SKIMPING ON 
TRAINING AND 
EDUCATION
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 
5. LACKING AN 
EXECUTIVE 
SPONSOR
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 
6. THINKING AGILE IS 
FASTER OR 
EASY
7. START WITH A 
TOOL 
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
8. FAILING TO SCALE 
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
9. ASSUMING 
AGILE = SCRUM 
COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT 
DIRECTING THE AGILE 
ORGANISATION 
BY EVAN LEYBOURN 
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL 
GOOD BOOK STOR...
EVAN LEYBOURN 
EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM 
INTRO TO SCRUM 
PART 2: ROLES & 
RESPONSIBILITIES
Evan Leybourn 
Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author 
Melbourne, Australia 
@eleybourn 
http://theagiledirector.com 
CLI...
USERS WILL 
USE THE SOFTWARE, 
IDENTIFY ISSUES & 
PROVIDE FEEDBACK
USERS CAN BE 
THERE ARE NO 
TYPICAL USERS
USERS DO NOT 
SET SCOPE OR 
TEST WORK
CUSTOMERS WILL 
DEFINE, START& 
END THE PROJECT
CUSTOMERS CAN BE 
INTERNAL 
MANAGERS OR 
EXTERNAL CLIENTS
CUSTOMERS DO NOT 
DIRECT WORK
THE PRODUCT OWNER WILL 
MANAGE THE 
PRODUCT BACKLOG, 
SET THE SCOPE & 
APPROVE RELEASES
THE PRODUCT OWNER CAN BE 
PROJECT MANAGER, 
PRODUCT MANAGER 
OR CUSTOMER
THE PRODUCT OWNER DOES NOT 
MANAGE THE TEAM
THE SCRUM MASTER WILL 
MANAGE THE AGILE 
PROCESS & REPORT 
ON PROGRESS
THE SCRUM MASTER CAN BE 
PROJECT MANAGER, 
TEAM LEADER OR 
TEAM MEMBER
THE SCRUM MASTER DOES NOT 
PRIORITISE 
FEATURES
DEVELOPERS WILL 
DEVELOP 
FEATURES, AND 
RESOLVE ISSUES
DEVELOPERS CAN BE 
DEVELOPERS, 
DESIGNERS, WRITERS, 
OR ADMINISTRATORS 
CROSS FUNCTIONAL
DEVELOPERS DO NOT 
PRIORITISE 
FEATURES
TESTERS WILL 
TEST, APPROVE OR 
REJECT FEATURES 
FOR RELEASE
TESTERS CAN BE 
EXISTING 
DEVELOPERS OR 
DEDICATED TESTERS
TESTERS DO NOT 
TEST THEIR OWN 
CODE
7 +/- 2 
TYPICAL TEAM SIZE
HAS AN INTEREST IN 
THE WORK & IS 
KEPT UP TO DATE 
INVOLVED PARTIES (CHICKENS)
COMMITTED PARTIES (PIGS) 
"DO" THE WORK & 
ARE RESPONSIBLE 
FOR THE RELEASE
TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT 
DIRECTING THE AGILE 
ORGANISATION 
BY EVAN LEYBOURN 
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL 
GOOD BOOK STOR...
EVAN LEYBOURN 
EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM 
INTRO TO SCRUM 
PART 3: SPRINT 0
Evan Leybourn 
Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author 
Melbourne, Australia 
@eleybourn 
http://theagiledirector.com 
CLI...
ALSO KNOWN AS 
FEASIBILITY, 
PROJECT INITIATION 
OR ITERATION 0 (XP)
REDUCE RISK & 
UNCERTAINTY 
BY DEFINING THE HIGH LEVEL SCOPE
ALIGN TO STRATEGIC 
GOALS, & TECHNICAL 
FRAMEWORKS 
SKILLS GAP ANALYSIS & RECRUITMENT
BEGINNING THE PROCESS 
AGILE PROJECTS 
HAVE MINIMAL 
INITIATION
THE DEVELOPMENT TEAM SHOULD BE 
ENGAGED DURING 
INITIATION
CUSTOMER IS FULLY 
AWARE OF THEIR 
RESPONSIBILITIES 
CUSTOMERS SHARE ACCOUNTABILITY FOR DELIVERY
REMOVE ANY POTENTIAL IMPEDIMENTS 
ADD TRAINING 
TASKS TO THE 
BACKLOG
“Friends don’t let friends use 
Microsoft Project”
CREATE THE INITIAL 
PRODUCT BACKLOG 
(IN LOW DETAIL) 
ALLOW CUSTOMERS TO SLOWLY DEFINE THEIR NEEDS
ESTIMATE THE 
PRODUCT BACKLOG 
FIRST ORDER ESTIMATE -USING STORY POINTS
1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 20, 40, 100 
FIBONACCI SEQUENCE
EXPERT OPINION 
THE TEAM MEMBER 
WITH SPECIFIC 
DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE 
E.G. A DBA ESTIMATING DATABASE TASKS.
COMPARISON 
COMPARING A TASK 
TO ANOTHER, 
ESTIMATED, TASK. 
E.G. TASK A IS ABOUT TWICE THE EFFORT OF TASK B
COMPONENTS 
BREAK A LARGE 
TASK INTO SMALL 
SUB-TASKS 
E.G. BREAK USER MANAGEMENT INTO 
INTERFACE, LOGIN, ACCESS CONTROL, ...
PLANNING POKER 
EACH TEAM MEMBER 
PLAYS A CARD 
REPRESENTING THEIR 
ESTIMATE 
EVERYONE PARTICIPATES TO REACH CONSENSUS
Estimates must not be mentioned 
during planning discussion to 
avoid anchoring
STAFF OVERHEAD: NON PROJECT TIME 
ESTIMATED LEAVE, 
ILLNESS, BREAKS, 
MEETINGS ETC. 
GENERIC INDUSTRY MODIFIER: 25%
DURATION CALCULATION 
STORY COST X 
(OVERHEAD + 1) X 
(ESTIMATE RISK + 1) 
ESTIMATE RISK IS OPTIONAL
FOR EXAMPLE 
4 X (25% + 1) X (50%+ 1) 
= 4 X 1.25 X 1.5 
= 5 TO 7.5 HOURS
SPRINTS SHOULD 
BE BETWEEN 1 & 4 
WEEKS 
SHORTER SPRINTS PROVIDE MORE 
OPPORTUNITIES TO INSPECT & ADAPT
- “How much is this going to cost?” 
- “As much as you’re willing to 
spend.”
- “How long is this going to take?” 
- “As long as is necessary.”
- “What am I going to get?” 
- “Whatever you tell us you want.”
WORK IN PRIORITY 
ORDER, RELEASE 
QUICKLY & MONITOR 
BURN RATE 
FIXED COST
WORK IN PRIORITY 
ORDER & ENFORCE 
SPRINT LENGTH 
FIXED TIME
FIXED SCOPE 
FOCUS ON BACKLOG 
DEFINITION AND 
ESTIMATION
FIXED COST AND TIME 
CALCULATE TOTAL 
COST AS COST PER 
SPRINT
FIXED COST AND SCOPE 
INCREASE THE 
ESTIMATE RISK 
DURING SPRINT 0
FIXED TIME AND SCOPE 
PRE-ASSIGN WORK 
TO SPRINTS & PAD 
SCHEDULE WITH 
EXTRA SPRINTS
FIXED COST, TIME AND SCOPE 
CANCEL THE 
PROJECT
TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT 
DIRECTING THE AGILE 
ORGANISATION 
BY EVAN LEYBOURN 
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL 
GOOD BOOK STOR...
EVAN LEYBOURN 
EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM 
INTRO TO SCRUM 
PART 4: SPRINTS
Evan Leybourn 
Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author 
Melbourne, Australia 
@eleybourn 
http://theagiledirector.com 
CLI...
CONVERT THE 
BACKLOG INTO A 
REALISTIC GOAL 
SPRINT PLANNING
THIS IS A CREATIVE 
PROCESS: PREPARE 
BEFOREHAND 
SUPPLY PAPER, A WHITEBOARD AND INTERNET ACCESS.
PRIORITISE THE 
PRODUCT BACKLOG 
BEFORE THE PLANNING WORKSHOP
DEFINE THE 
BUSINESS GOAL 
FOR THE SPRINT 
PART 1: BUSINESS PLANNING
ENCOURAGE A STABLE & CONSISTENT WORKFLOW 
SPRINT SCOPE IS 
LIMITED BY TEAM 
VELOCITY
PART 2: TECHNICAL PLANNING 
DECOMPOSE USER 
STORIES INTO 
TASKS (< 1 DAY)
CREATE THE SPRINT 
BACKLOG (IN HIGH 
DETAIL) 
OWNED & MAINTAINED BY THE DEVELOPERS
PLAN, DESIGN & 
ESTIMATE TASKS 
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
GET HIGHEST 
PRIORITY FEATURE 
ALLOW DEVELOPERS TO CHOOSE THEIR TASKS
TEST –DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT
TEST COVERAGE 
FUNCTIONS, 
BOUNDARY CASES, 
USER INTERFACE & 
PERFORMANCE
TEST TYPES 
DEFECT, USABILITY, 
FUNCTIONALITY & 
DATA
PAIR PROGRAMMING: 
CODER + REVIEWER 
BUILD
CODE STANDARDS: 
A COMMON CODING 
STYLE 
BUILD
SYSTEM METAPHOR: 
CLEAR NAMING 
STANDARDS 
BUILD
REGULAR COMMITS 
VERSION CONTROL
AUTOMATED: UNIT 
TESTING, COVERAGE, 
DOCUMENTATION, 
STANDARDS & BUILD 
CONTINUOUS INTEGRATION
WHAT DID YOU DO 
YESTERDAY? 
DAILY SCRUM
WHAT WILL YOU DO 
TODAY? 
DAILY SCRUM
ARE THERE ANY 
ISSUES? 
DAILY SCRUM
SCRUM OF SCRUMS 
FOR LARGE TEAMS
CUSTOMERS CAN 
ALWAYS SEE 
PROGRESS 
PROMOTING TRANSPARENCY THROUGH THE 
SCRUMS AND BACKLOG
VIEW PROGRESS AGAINST THE RELEASE 
IMPROVE FUTURE 
ESTIMATES
PROGRESS MONITORING 
BURNUP CHARTS 
BURNDOWN CHARTS 
CUMULATIVE FLOW 
STATISTICAL RUN
EFFORT VISUALISATION 
PLOT DELIVERED 
FUNCTIONALITY 
AGAINST VELOCITY
BURNUP CHART
BURNDOWN CHART
VELOCITY 
HOW MUCH WORK 
CAN BE DELIVERED 
PER SPRINT
DON'T MANAGE BY NUMBERS 
IDENTIFY PROBLEM 
TRENDS EARLY
DISCOVERY
SCOPE CREEP
PLATEAU
TOO MANY FEATURES
TRACKING EPICS
DIFFERS BY ORGANISATION 
WHAT DOES 
“DONE” 
MEAN?
DEFINITION OF “DONE” 
DOCUMENTATION? 
UAT? 
BUILT / COMPILED?
WHAT DOES 
“NOT DONE” 
MEAN? 
REMEMBER THE PRIMARY MEASURE OF PROGRESS
PER SPRINT OR 
ACROSS SPRINTS 
DEPLOY
PRESENT & REVIEW 
COMPLETED WORK 
TO THE CUSTOMER 
SPRINT REVIEW
RETROSPECTIVE & 
KAIZEN (改善) 
CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
WHAT WENT WELL? 
SPRINT RETROSPECTIVE
ADD ACTIONABLE TASKS TO THE PRODUCT 
BACKLOG 
WHAT COULD BE 
IMPROVED?
KAIZEN EMPHASISES 
TEAMWORK, 
DISCIPLINE & 
MORALE
TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT 
DIRECTING THE AGILE 
ORGANISATION 
BY EVAN LEYBOURN 
AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL 
GOOD BOOK STOR...
Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop
Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop
Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop
Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop
Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop
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Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop

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If you like the ideas raised in this presentation, don't forget to check out my latest book, Directing the Agile Organisation (http://theagiledirector.com/book).

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  • Add ABM/GDAC logo
  • Let’s finish off by looking at our original definition of business growth; Business growth comes from applying profitability to customer growth. Profitability comes from delivering services to your customers, accurately and efficiently. Over the last 15 minutes we have looked at some of the mechanisms from the lean and agile traditions that we can apply for adaptable businesses and sustainable business growth.

    And I’ll leave you on that note. Any questions.
  • Add ABM/GDAC logo
  • Let’s finish off by looking at our original definition of business growth; Business growth comes from applying profitability to customer growth. Profitability comes from delivering services to your customers, accurately and efficiently. Over the last 15 minutes we have looked at some of the mechanisms from the lean and agile traditions that we can apply for adaptable businesses and sustainable business growth.

    And I’ll leave you on that note. Any questions.
  • Add ABM/GDAC logo
  • Let’s finish off by looking at our original definition of business growth; Business growth comes from applying profitability to customer growth. Profitability comes from delivering services to your customers, accurately and efficiently. Over the last 15 minutes we have looked at some of the mechanisms from the lean and agile traditions that we can apply for adaptable businesses and sustainable business growth.

    And I’ll leave you on that note. Any questions.
  • Add ABM/GDAC logo
  • Let’s finish off by looking at our original definition of business growth; Business growth comes from applying profitability to customer growth. Profitability comes from delivering services to your customers, accurately and efficiently. Over the last 15 minutes we have looked at some of the mechanisms from the lean and agile traditions that we can apply for adaptable businesses and sustainable business growth.

    And I’ll leave you on that note. Any questions.
  • Introduction to Scrum - 1 day workshop

    1. 1. EVAN LEYBOURN EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM INTRO TO SCRUM PART 1: HISTORY & CORE CONCEPTS
    2. 2. Evan Leybourn Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author Melbourne, Australia @eleybourn http://theagiledirector.com
    3. 3. WHAT DOES BEING “AGILE” ACTUALLY MEAN? THE AGILE MANIFESTO
    4. 4. Waterfall Agile
    5. 5. Waterfall (Incrementing) Agile (Iterating) Images with thanks from Jeff Patton: http://www.agileproductdesign.com/
    6. 6. INDIVIDUALS AND INTERACTIONS OVER PROCESSES AND TOOLS
    7. 7. WORKING SOFTWARE OVER COMPREHENSIVE DOCUMENTATION
    8. 8. CUSTOMER COLLABORATION OVER CONTRACT NEGOTIATION
    9. 9. RESPONDING TO CHANGE OVER FOLLOWING A PLAN
    10. 10. 1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
    11. 11. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage.
    12. 12. 3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
    13. 13. 4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
    14. 14. 5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
    15. 15. 6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.
    16. 16. 7. Working software is the primary measure of progress.
    17. 17. 8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.
    18. 18. 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
    19. 19. 10.Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential.
    20. 20. 11.The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.
    21. 21. 12.At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behaviour accordingly.
    22. 22. INSPECT ADAPT INSPECT HOW DOES “AGILE” WORK
    23. 23. WORKFLOW AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT AUP, CRYSTAL CLEAR, DSDM, KANBAN, RUP, SCRUM
    24. 24. SCRUM * Iterative Product Development * 1-4 week Sprints * Formal Roles (Product Owner & Scrum Master) * Timeboxed Meetings
    25. 25. DEVELOPMENT METHODS BDD, FDD, RAD, LEAN SOFTWARE, XP
    26. 26. Extreme Programming Activities Writing the Software Testing the Software Listening to the Customer Designing & Refactoring Development Pair Programming Common Code Standards Clear System Metaphor
    27. 27. QUALITY METHODS TEST DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT
    28. 28. Test-Driven Development 1. Create a test 2. Add the test to the test catalogue 3. Write the code 4. Run the tests (all of them) 5. Clean up the code as required. (Refactor)
    29. 29. 1. AGILE MEANS NO DOCUMENTATION COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
    30. 30. 2. NOT MEASURING, MONITORING OR CORRECTING COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
    31. 31. COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 3. ASSUMING YOU CAN DO MORE WITH LESS
    32. 32. COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 4. SKIMPING ON TRAINING AND EDUCATION
    33. 33. COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 5. LACKING AN EXECUTIVE SPONSOR
    34. 34. COMMON AGILE MISTAKES 6. THINKING AGILE IS FASTER OR EASY
    35. 35. 7. START WITH A TOOL COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
    36. 36. 8. FAILING TO SCALE COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
    37. 37. 9. ASSUMING AGILE = SCRUM COMMON AGILE MISTAKES
    38. 38. TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT DIRECTING THE AGILE ORGANISATION BY EVAN LEYBOURN AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL GOOD BOOK STORES CLICK HERE TO DISCOVER MORE
    39. 39. EVAN LEYBOURN EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM INTRO TO SCRUM PART 2: ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES
    40. 40. Evan Leybourn Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author Melbourne, Australia @eleybourn http://theagiledirector.com CLICK TO DISCOVER MORE
    41. 41. USERS WILL USE THE SOFTWARE, IDENTIFY ISSUES & PROVIDE FEEDBACK
    42. 42. USERS CAN BE THERE ARE NO TYPICAL USERS
    43. 43. USERS DO NOT SET SCOPE OR TEST WORK
    44. 44. CUSTOMERS WILL DEFINE, START& END THE PROJECT
    45. 45. CUSTOMERS CAN BE INTERNAL MANAGERS OR EXTERNAL CLIENTS
    46. 46. CUSTOMERS DO NOT DIRECT WORK
    47. 47. THE PRODUCT OWNER WILL MANAGE THE PRODUCT BACKLOG, SET THE SCOPE & APPROVE RELEASES
    48. 48. THE PRODUCT OWNER CAN BE PROJECT MANAGER, PRODUCT MANAGER OR CUSTOMER
    49. 49. THE PRODUCT OWNER DOES NOT MANAGE THE TEAM
    50. 50. THE SCRUM MASTER WILL MANAGE THE AGILE PROCESS & REPORT ON PROGRESS
    51. 51. THE SCRUM MASTER CAN BE PROJECT MANAGER, TEAM LEADER OR TEAM MEMBER
    52. 52. THE SCRUM MASTER DOES NOT PRIORITISE FEATURES
    53. 53. DEVELOPERS WILL DEVELOP FEATURES, AND RESOLVE ISSUES
    54. 54. DEVELOPERS CAN BE DEVELOPERS, DESIGNERS, WRITERS, OR ADMINISTRATORS CROSS FUNCTIONAL
    55. 55. DEVELOPERS DO NOT PRIORITISE FEATURES
    56. 56. TESTERS WILL TEST, APPROVE OR REJECT FEATURES FOR RELEASE
    57. 57. TESTERS CAN BE EXISTING DEVELOPERS OR DEDICATED TESTERS
    58. 58. TESTERS DO NOT TEST THEIR OWN CODE
    59. 59. 7 +/- 2 TYPICAL TEAM SIZE
    60. 60. HAS AN INTEREST IN THE WORK & IS KEPT UP TO DATE INVOLVED PARTIES (CHICKENS)
    61. 61. COMMITTED PARTIES (PIGS) "DO" THE WORK & ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RELEASE
    62. 62. TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT DIRECTING THE AGILE ORGANISATION BY EVAN LEYBOURN AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL GOOD BOOK STORES CLICK HERE TO DISCOVER MORE
    63. 63. EVAN LEYBOURN EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM INTRO TO SCRUM PART 3: SPRINT 0
    64. 64. Evan Leybourn Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author Melbourne, Australia @eleybourn http://theagiledirector.com CLICK TO DISCOVER MORE
    65. 65. ALSO KNOWN AS FEASIBILITY, PROJECT INITIATION OR ITERATION 0 (XP)
    66. 66. REDUCE RISK & UNCERTAINTY BY DEFINING THE HIGH LEVEL SCOPE
    67. 67. ALIGN TO STRATEGIC GOALS, & TECHNICAL FRAMEWORKS SKILLS GAP ANALYSIS & RECRUITMENT
    68. 68. BEGINNING THE PROCESS AGILE PROJECTS HAVE MINIMAL INITIATION
    69. 69. THE DEVELOPMENT TEAM SHOULD BE ENGAGED DURING INITIATION
    70. 70. CUSTOMER IS FULLY AWARE OF THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES CUSTOMERS SHARE ACCOUNTABILITY FOR DELIVERY
    71. 71. REMOVE ANY POTENTIAL IMPEDIMENTS ADD TRAINING TASKS TO THE BACKLOG
    72. 72. “Friends don’t let friends use Microsoft Project”
    73. 73. CREATE THE INITIAL PRODUCT BACKLOG (IN LOW DETAIL) ALLOW CUSTOMERS TO SLOWLY DEFINE THEIR NEEDS
    74. 74. ESTIMATE THE PRODUCT BACKLOG FIRST ORDER ESTIMATE -USING STORY POINTS
    75. 75. 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 20, 40, 100 FIBONACCI SEQUENCE
    76. 76. EXPERT OPINION THE TEAM MEMBER WITH SPECIFIC DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE E.G. A DBA ESTIMATING DATABASE TASKS.
    77. 77. COMPARISON COMPARING A TASK TO ANOTHER, ESTIMATED, TASK. E.G. TASK A IS ABOUT TWICE THE EFFORT OF TASK B
    78. 78. COMPONENTS BREAK A LARGE TASK INTO SMALL SUB-TASKS E.G. BREAK USER MANAGEMENT INTO INTERFACE, LOGIN, ACCESS CONTROL, ETC.
    79. 79. PLANNING POKER EACH TEAM MEMBER PLAYS A CARD REPRESENTING THEIR ESTIMATE EVERYONE PARTICIPATES TO REACH CONSENSUS
    80. 80. Estimates must not be mentioned during planning discussion to avoid anchoring
    81. 81. STAFF OVERHEAD: NON PROJECT TIME ESTIMATED LEAVE, ILLNESS, BREAKS, MEETINGS ETC. GENERIC INDUSTRY MODIFIER: 25%
    82. 82. DURATION CALCULATION STORY COST X (OVERHEAD + 1) X (ESTIMATE RISK + 1) ESTIMATE RISK IS OPTIONAL
    83. 83. FOR EXAMPLE 4 X (25% + 1) X (50%+ 1) = 4 X 1.25 X 1.5 = 5 TO 7.5 HOURS
    84. 84. SPRINTS SHOULD BE BETWEEN 1 & 4 WEEKS SHORTER SPRINTS PROVIDE MORE OPPORTUNITIES TO INSPECT & ADAPT
    85. 85. - “How much is this going to cost?” - “As much as you’re willing to spend.”
    86. 86. - “How long is this going to take?” - “As long as is necessary.”
    87. 87. - “What am I going to get?” - “Whatever you tell us you want.”
    88. 88. WORK IN PRIORITY ORDER, RELEASE QUICKLY & MONITOR BURN RATE FIXED COST
    89. 89. WORK IN PRIORITY ORDER & ENFORCE SPRINT LENGTH FIXED TIME
    90. 90. FIXED SCOPE FOCUS ON BACKLOG DEFINITION AND ESTIMATION
    91. 91. FIXED COST AND TIME CALCULATE TOTAL COST AS COST PER SPRINT
    92. 92. FIXED COST AND SCOPE INCREASE THE ESTIMATE RISK DURING SPRINT 0
    93. 93. FIXED TIME AND SCOPE PRE-ASSIGN WORK TO SPRINTS & PAD SCHEDULE WITH EXTRA SPRINTS
    94. 94. FIXED COST, TIME AND SCOPE CANCEL THE PROJECT
    95. 95. TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT DIRECTING THE AGILE ORGANISATION BY EVAN LEYBOURN AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL GOOD BOOK STORES CLICK HERE TO DISCOVER MORE
    96. 96. EVAN LEYBOURN EVAN@THEAGILEDIRECTOR.COM INTRO TO SCRUM PART 4: SPRINTS
    97. 97. Evan Leybourn Lean / Agile Business Leader and Author Melbourne, Australia @eleybourn http://theagiledirector.com CLICK TO DISCOVER MORE
    98. 98. CONVERT THE BACKLOG INTO A REALISTIC GOAL SPRINT PLANNING
    99. 99. THIS IS A CREATIVE PROCESS: PREPARE BEFOREHAND SUPPLY PAPER, A WHITEBOARD AND INTERNET ACCESS.
    100. 100. PRIORITISE THE PRODUCT BACKLOG BEFORE THE PLANNING WORKSHOP
    101. 101. DEFINE THE BUSINESS GOAL FOR THE SPRINT PART 1: BUSINESS PLANNING
    102. 102. ENCOURAGE A STABLE & CONSISTENT WORKFLOW SPRINT SCOPE IS LIMITED BY TEAM VELOCITY
    103. 103. PART 2: TECHNICAL PLANNING DECOMPOSE USER STORIES INTO TASKS (< 1 DAY)
    104. 104. CREATE THE SPRINT BACKLOG (IN HIGH DETAIL) OWNED & MAINTAINED BY THE DEVELOPERS
    105. 105. PLAN, DESIGN & ESTIMATE TASKS TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
    106. 106. GET HIGHEST PRIORITY FEATURE ALLOW DEVELOPERS TO CHOOSE THEIR TASKS
    107. 107. TEST –DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT
    108. 108. TEST COVERAGE FUNCTIONS, BOUNDARY CASES, USER INTERFACE & PERFORMANCE
    109. 109. TEST TYPES DEFECT, USABILITY, FUNCTIONALITY & DATA
    110. 110. PAIR PROGRAMMING: CODER + REVIEWER BUILD
    111. 111. CODE STANDARDS: A COMMON CODING STYLE BUILD
    112. 112. SYSTEM METAPHOR: CLEAR NAMING STANDARDS BUILD
    113. 113. REGULAR COMMITS VERSION CONTROL
    114. 114. AUTOMATED: UNIT TESTING, COVERAGE, DOCUMENTATION, STANDARDS & BUILD CONTINUOUS INTEGRATION
    115. 115. WHAT DID YOU DO YESTERDAY? DAILY SCRUM
    116. 116. WHAT WILL YOU DO TODAY? DAILY SCRUM
    117. 117. ARE THERE ANY ISSUES? DAILY SCRUM
    118. 118. SCRUM OF SCRUMS FOR LARGE TEAMS
    119. 119. CUSTOMERS CAN ALWAYS SEE PROGRESS PROMOTING TRANSPARENCY THROUGH THE SCRUMS AND BACKLOG
    120. 120. VIEW PROGRESS AGAINST THE RELEASE IMPROVE FUTURE ESTIMATES
    121. 121. PROGRESS MONITORING BURNUP CHARTS BURNDOWN CHARTS CUMULATIVE FLOW STATISTICAL RUN
    122. 122. EFFORT VISUALISATION PLOT DELIVERED FUNCTIONALITY AGAINST VELOCITY
    123. 123. BURNUP CHART
    124. 124. BURNDOWN CHART
    125. 125. VELOCITY HOW MUCH WORK CAN BE DELIVERED PER SPRINT
    126. 126. DON'T MANAGE BY NUMBERS IDENTIFY PROBLEM TRENDS EARLY
    127. 127. DISCOVERY
    128. 128. SCOPE CREEP
    129. 129. PLATEAU
    130. 130. TOO MANY FEATURES
    131. 131. TRACKING EPICS
    132. 132. DIFFERS BY ORGANISATION WHAT DOES “DONE” MEAN?
    133. 133. DEFINITION OF “DONE” DOCUMENTATION? UAT? BUILT / COMPILED?
    134. 134. WHAT DOES “NOT DONE” MEAN? REMEMBER THE PRIMARY MEASURE OF PROGRESS
    135. 135. PER SPRINT OR ACROSS SPRINTS DEPLOY
    136. 136. PRESENT & REVIEW COMPLETED WORK TO THE CUSTOMER SPRINT REVIEW
    137. 137. RETROSPECTIVE & KAIZEN (改善) CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
    138. 138. WHAT WENT WELL? SPRINT RETROSPECTIVE
    139. 139. ADD ACTIONABLE TASKS TO THE PRODUCT BACKLOG WHAT COULD BE IMPROVED?
    140. 140. KAIZEN EMPHASISES TEAMWORK, DISCIPLINE & MORALE
    141. 141. TO LEARN MORE, CHECK OUT DIRECTING THE AGILE ORGANISATION BY EVAN LEYBOURN AVAILABLE AT AMAZON AND ALL GOOD BOOK STORES CLICK HERE TO DISCOVER MORE

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