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BUILDING THE ECO-SYSTEM TOWARDS A KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY STEPHANIE HUF  VICE PRESIDENT & HEAD OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS E...
<ul><li>IN THE NETWORKED SOCIETY  PEOPLE, KNOWLEDGE, DEVICES, AND INFORMATION  ARE NETWORKED FOR THE GROWTH OF SOCIETY, LI...
Networked society driving forces MOBILITY BROADBAND CLOUD
… ADD Interaction logic MOBILITY BROADBAND CLOUD IDENTITY ACTIVITY CONTEXT PRESENCE PREFERENCES OPEN SOURCE TRANSACTION DA...
THE Networked Society  – OPPORTUNITIES BEYOND IMAGINATION INTERACTION BROADBAND  MOBILITY  CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE COLLABORAT...
FOR EXAMPLE… NETWORKED HEALTHCARE NETWORKED SCHOOL NETWORKED UTILITIES NETWORKED MONEY
NETWORKED SOCIETY CITY INDEX Networked Society City Index high medium low low medium high ICT Maturity Triple bottom line ...
TARGETED APPROACH… <ul><li>SINGAPORE: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>INFOCOM DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY HOLISTIC STRATEGY IN 2006 TO ATT...
CREATING A NETWORKED CITY ICT maturity enhances the triple-bottom-line leverage Dependence on smart initiatives ICT in pub...
www.e-asia.org
POLICY implications Spectrum Competition & industry policies Broadband affordability  Rights management  Privacy  ICT an e...
<ul><li>every 10% increase in broadband penetration delivers 1% GDP boost. </li></ul><ul><li>Ericsson in cooperation with ...
<ul><li>Doubling the broadband speed for  an economy increases GDP by 0.3% </li></ul><ul><li>Ericsson in cooperation with ...
ECONOMIC IMPACT <ul><li>A 0.3% GDP growth in the OECD region is equivalent to USD126 billion, which in turn corresponds to...
ECONOMIC IMPACT Higher broadband speed has direct, indirect and induced effects on the economy Source:  Arthur D. Little r...
DIRECT, INDIRECT AND INDUCED EFFECTS ON THE ECONOMY <ul><li>Direct effect:  In the short run, more jobs will be needed to ...
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Building the eco system towards a knowledge economy- stephanie huf, marketing and communications ericsson southeast asia and oceania

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Building the eco system towards a knowledge economy- stephanie huf, marketing and communications ericsson southeast asia and oceania

  1. 1. BUILDING THE ECO-SYSTEM TOWARDS A KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY STEPHANIE HUF VICE PRESIDENT & HEAD OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS ERICSSON SOUTHEAST ASIA AND OCEANIA www.e-asia.org
  2. 2. <ul><li>IN THE NETWORKED SOCIETY PEOPLE, KNOWLEDGE, DEVICES, AND INFORMATION ARE NETWORKED FOR THE GROWTH OF SOCIETY, LIFE AND BUSINESS. </li></ul>Vision www.e-asia.org
  3. 3. Networked society driving forces MOBILITY BROADBAND CLOUD
  4. 4. … ADD Interaction logic MOBILITY BROADBAND CLOUD IDENTITY ACTIVITY CONTEXT PRESENCE PREFERENCES OPEN SOURCE TRANSACTION DATA INFORMATION AUGMENTATION LOCATION
  5. 5. THE Networked Society – OPPORTUNITIES BEYOND IMAGINATION INTERACTION BROADBAND MOBILITY CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE COLLABORATION INNOVATION INTEGRITY TRANSFORMATION TRUST INCLUSION SCALE GLOBAL CHALLENGES MEDIA COMMERCE SECURITY & SAFETY GOVERNMENT EDUCATION TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS HEALTHCARE UTILITIES
  6. 6. FOR EXAMPLE… NETWORKED HEALTHCARE NETWORKED SCHOOL NETWORKED UTILITIES NETWORKED MONEY
  7. 7. NETWORKED SOCIETY CITY INDEX Networked Society City Index high medium low low medium high ICT Maturity Triple bottom line leverage from ICT 90 80 70 100 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Johannesburg Mumbai Tokyo Sydney Stockholm Singapore Shanghai Seoul São Paulo Paris New York Moscow Mexico City Manila Los Angeles London ICT maturity Triple botom line leverage Karachi Jakarta Istanbul Lagos Delhi Buenos Aires Beijing Cairo Dacca This spring, Ericsson released the Networked Society City Index Part 1– Singapore ranked as #1 followed by Stockholm and Seoul Strong interest over five continents Example publications
  8. 8. TARGETED APPROACH… <ul><li>SINGAPORE: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>INFOCOM DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY HOLISTIC STRATEGY IN 2006 TO ATTRACT INVESTMENT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TRAFFIC, GOVERNMENT PAYMENTS, ICT EDUCATION </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PARIS: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SHARING MUNICIPAL DATA/MAPS TO ENOURAGE APPLICATIONS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LAUNCHING CITY WIDE CAR SHARING SCHEME FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SAO PAULO: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E-GOVERNMENT, REAL ESTATE LICENCING TAX INCENTIVES </li></ul></ul><ul><li>MANILA: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I-LEARNING INFRASTRUCTURE IN SCHOOLS, e-SCIENCE GRID FOR RESEARCH COLLABORATION </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. CREATING A NETWORKED CITY ICT maturity enhances the triple-bottom-line leverage Dependence on smart initiatives ICT in public administration holds large potential Education is a prerequisite for efficient leverage of ICT
  10. 10. www.e-asia.org
  11. 11. POLICY implications Spectrum Competition & industry policies Broadband affordability Rights management Privacy ICT an enabler to policy
  12. 12. <ul><li>every 10% increase in broadband penetration delivers 1% GDP boost. </li></ul><ul><li>Ericsson in cooperation with Arthur D. Little, 2010 . </li></ul>www.e-asia.org
  13. 13. <ul><li>Doubling the broadband speed for an economy increases GDP by 0.3% </li></ul><ul><li>Ericsson in cooperation with Arthur D. Little and Chalmers Institute of Technology. Based on econometric analysis of 33 OECD countries quarterly data during 2008-2010. </li></ul>www.e-asia.org
  14. 14. ECONOMIC IMPACT <ul><li>A 0.3% GDP growth in the OECD region is equivalent to USD126 billion, which in turn corresponds to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than the combined GDP of the Baltic countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than one seventh of average OECD growth rate in the last decade </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Equivalent to the annual total OECD aid to Africa </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Additional doublings of speed can yield growth in excess of 0.3% (e.g. quadrupling of speed equals 0.6% GDP growth stimulus) </li></ul>
  15. 15. ECONOMIC IMPACT Higher broadband speed has direct, indirect and induced effects on the economy Source: Arthur D. Little research (covering more than 120 reports from leading research institutes) Impact Time Direct effects Indirect effects Induced effects
  16. 16. DIRECT, INDIRECT AND INDUCED EFFECTS ON THE ECONOMY <ul><li>Direct effect: In the short run, more jobs will be needed to create the new infrastructure – this is referred to as the direct effect </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Construction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Telecommunications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Electronics </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Indirect effect: include spillover effects from one sector to another and efficiency improvement in the economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Induced effect: New ways of doing business caused by increased broadband speed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More advanced online services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New utility services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Telecommuting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Telepresence </li></ul></ul>

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