University Libraries
University of California Santa Cruz
June 8, 2009
Santa Cruz, CA
By
Amanda Xu
St. John’s University Li...
Overview
Economic Challenges and Opportunities for Academic
Libraries as Gateways, Archives, a Place, Buyers, etc.
Chang...
Library as Gateways
“Provide instant access to electronic library holdings and resources
for scholars, students and the p...
Library as Archives
“Advanced technology for digital preservation”
LTS - Developing in-house expertise in digital preser...
Library as a Place
“With greater capacity for traditional print collections”
LTS – Honoring tradition by continuously se...
Library as Buyers
Acquiring or subscribing information resources distributed to the
library by vendors in whatever delive...
Library as Universal Digital Library Infrastructure
LTS - Providing pervasive information infrastructure and computing
en...
8
BPM
1. Organization
2. People
3. Processes
4. Domains
5. Technologies
6. Distribution
7.Context
8. Culture
Increasing Digital Nature of Library Collection – Information as
Product
Project management, enterprise architecture (EA)...
Rising Expectations of End Users using Web As Infrastructure
21st
century enrollment
New students, new technologies and ...
Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (1)
A library resource is increasingly becoming a product, e.g. parts of a...
Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (2)
 Any collection of electronic data, from library catalogs to
collectio...
Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (3)
 Traditional information context
 Markup
 Types – Descriptive, Techn...
Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (4)
 Business Scenario for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.1)
 System F...
Introduction to FocusOnSearch and CategoryMap (4.1.a)
DATA - Structured (20%), Semi Structured & Unstructured (80%)
IDC ...
Introduction to FocusOnSearch and CategoryMap (4.1.b)
Browse both print and
electronic collections on term
“Algebra -Elec...
17
Business Scenario for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.2.a)
18
19
20
System Front End for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.3)
System Backend for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap
(Taxonomy Management Module) (4.4.a)
FocusOn Search application packages...
System Backend for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (Taxonomy
Management Module) (4.4.b)
 Link user services, collection ma...
23
24
25
ER Diagram Adapted from RDA (Resource Description and
Access) (4.5.b)
26
DFD (Data Flow Diagram) (4.6)
27
System Flow Chart for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.7.a)
28
System Flow Chart for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.7.b)
29
System Flow for Data Movement of all Vocabularies
Role of Technical Services in FocusOn Search and
CategoryMap (1)
1. Expand Content Selection to Unstructured Data on the W...
Role of Technical Services in FocusOn Search and
CategoryMap (2)
 Parallel development
 Global access to data
 User eng...
32
Duggan, J., & Stang, D. B. (2008). Magic quadrant for software change and configuration management for
distributed plat...
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Vision of Library Technical Services

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This is the presentation for UCSC Libraries and others in the month of June 2009.

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Vision of Library Technical Services

  1. 1. University Libraries University of California Santa Cruz June 8, 2009 Santa Cruz, CA By Amanda Xu St. John’s University Library xua@stjohns.edu 1
  2. 2. Overview Economic Challenges and Opportunities for Academic Libraries as Gateways, Archives, a Place, Buyers, etc. Changing Nature of Publishing and Library Acquisitions – Common Ground and Best Practice Increasing Digital Nature of Library Collection – Information as Product Rising Expectations of End Users using Web As Infrastructure Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control Role of Technical Services in FocusOn Search and CategoryMap 2
  3. 3. Library as Gateways “Provide instant access to electronic library holdings and resources for scholars, students and the public” LTS - Supporting the library’s role as gateways by embedding bibliographic data, authority data, holdings data, user data, and linkages into the context of user preferred experience:  LMS – Learning Management Systems / CMS – Course Management Systems/ RTS- Research Tracking Systems  Federated Search/ Google enterprise search  Library portals – III’s Encore, Next Generation Melvyl  LTS - Ensuring linked data quality by providing complete, clean, consistent, and current data for holdings, resource identity, etc. and by compliance with bibliographic control standards 3
  4. 4. Library as Archives “Advanced technology for digital preservation” LTS - Developing in-house expertise in digital preservation; LTS - Providing trainings for staff to be fluent with digital preservation standards, best practices, and tools; LTS - Actively participating in the living laboratory development for conversion and preservation of art, music, and text from their original media into digital ones in collaboration with content and technology partners, especially those in Special Collections and Archives, Media Services, and others. 4
  5. 5. Library as a Place “With greater capacity for traditional print collections” LTS – Honoring tradition by continuously selecting, acquiring, organizing, maintaining, tracking and reporting active holdings for the print collections via local integrated library systems, and any other external systems in the network, e.g. binding, OCLC, Melvyl, etc.  “Social learning and social networking” LTS – Embracing the changes to the library landscape by incorporating the appropriate tools into the library that supports social learning and networking, including using Web as infrastructure “Scholarly community and intellectual engagement” LTS – Participating in the infrastructure development for effective dissemination of ideas in the forum of talks, exhibits, and forums 5
  6. 6. Library as Buyers Acquiring or subscribing information resources distributed to the library by vendors in whatever delivery channels LTS – Providing solutions to the next generation of library technologies in acquisitions and cataloging of materials, and serials and electronic resources management; LTS - Improving the IT infrastructure for processing the information resources in various formats in collaboration with external and internal partners; 6
  7. 7. Library as Universal Digital Library Infrastructure LTS - Providing pervasive information infrastructure and computing environment, which integrate people, organizations, processes, data, information, and technologies in such a coherent manner that the objectives of a digital library can be performed, measured and controlled at the lowest meaningful and atomic level; LTS - Providing relevant, engaged, and customized information contents and services, which cover all resources, all vocabularies, and all languages to any given user at any time; LTS - Empowering the whole brain team using leadership, communication skills, project management, analytical skills, collaboration, and teamwork. 7
  8. 8. 8 BPM 1. Organization 2. People 3. Processes 4. Domains 5. Technologies 6. Distribution 7.Context 8. Culture
  9. 9. Increasing Digital Nature of Library Collection – Information as Product Project management, enterprise architecture (EA), EA modelling and business process modelling Content capturing Content modelling and content management systems  Search engine services  Enterprise service bus (ESB) and service-oriented architecture (SOA) Relational, multidimensional and ontological database management systems, and database administration Portal solutions Customer relationship management Service resolution management Business intelligence and reporting Information security 9
  10. 10. Rising Expectations of End Users using Web As Infrastructure 21st century enrollment New students, new technologies and new senses Media education Teaching and learning of 21st century skills Digital divide between faculty and students Mending the gaps by Library  Digital age literacy  Inventive thinking  Effective communication  High productivity  21st century research Cyber infrastructure for research in science, engineering, humanities and social sciences One to one engagement 10
  11. 11. Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (1) A library resource is increasingly becoming a product, e.g. parts of a book or collection of books aggregated, distributed, and disaggregated in heterogeneous computing environment with end service point on the Web platform geared toward a specific user group community, who are the supporters of the library services (M.V.C. & M.G.C.); Unified/federated approach to bibliographic control of library resources purchased, licensed, in-house developed, or freely available in the public domain through common infrastructures at presentation layer, process layer, service layer, business logic layer, database layer, content model layer; 11
  12. 12. Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (2)  Any collection of electronic data, from library catalogs to collections of full-text packages whether structured or unstructured in any media type on the Internet can be:  Interwoven with enterprise-wide resources, processes, services, systems and devices  Mined through automated means, e.g. named entity and noun phrases extraction, analysis, association, and interpretation  Sliced and diced for better forecasting and decision making using data warehousing and business intelligence packages on things such as library collection analysis, development and re- organization  Bibliographic control is increasingly a matter of managing relationships – among works, names, concepts, and object descriptions across communities with emphasis on reuse, scalability, maintainability, traceability, efficiency, and productivity 12
  13. 13. Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (3)  Traditional information context  Markup  Types – Descriptive, Technical, Administrative, Structural, Preservation;  Typical library metadata schemes – MARC, TEI, EAD, Dublin Core, VRA, MODS, MIX, METS, PREMIS, CDWA  A metadata scheme specifies – semantic, content, syntax  Crosswalks – among metadata schemes  Maintenance – Validate of the above & CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) & archive  Digital information context  Linked Data – Web of things  CIA – Confidential, Integrity, Available  Adaptable, maintainable & lifecycle  Separation of concerns: rules, patterns, structures & behavior 13
  14. 14. Innovative Approaches to Bibliographic Control (4)  Business Scenario for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.1)  System Front End for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.2)  System Backend for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (Taxonomy Management Module) (4.3)  FocusOn Search and CategoryMap in Distributed Network/Web (Logical Network Diagram) (4.4)  ER Diagram Adapted from RDA (Resource Description and Access) (4.5)  DFD (Data Flow Diagram) Context Level for FocusOnSearch (4.6)  System Flow Chart for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.7)  System Flow Chart for the Data Movement of all Vocabularies (4.8) 14
  15. 15. Introduction to FocusOnSearch and CategoryMap (4.1.a) DATA - Structured (20%), Semi Structured & Unstructured (80%) IDC - Percentage Searches on Web – “Aboutness” for a topic search (45%), and scientific and technical info search (35%) Query limited to Boolean, Relevance ranking, Phrase, Link Analysis on Refined Indexes by Keywords, Media, and File Types on Web Unknown Named Entities and Topical Search often Discovered by Accident on Web Result List Rendered often Makes no Sense for “Aboutness” Search on Web, let alone supporting business intelligence Cumbersome Info Sharing Processes for Enterprise Wide Information Discovery 15
  16. 16. Introduction to FocusOnSearch and CategoryMap (4.1.b) Browse both print and electronic collections on term “Algebra -Electronic Data Processing” and Mathematics by LC classification scheme with a single click Enable a single measurement point to benchmark processes on university resources and library Integrate one or more category maps by classifying university resources and library consistently Enable trend analysis for collection development needs on terms such as “Combinatorics” or “Henry George?” Enable repackaging and unbundling of resources by fine-grained topics Answer questions like “To whom will the collection serve, e.g. for which school program, instructor, courses, etc.” “How well does the collection meet the need of faculty and at what cost?” 16
  17. 17. 17 Business Scenario for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.2.a)
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 20 System Front End for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.3)
  21. 21. System Backend for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (Taxonomy Management Module) (4.4.a) FocusOn Search application packages entail a stack of services:  Centralized catalog;  Handle media types in the catalog;  Named entities – Person, family, and corporate be linked and mashed up for obtaining the aboutness and of-ness of a person, locally and remotely via public available APIs on top of HTTP and/ ESBs within the private cloud computing network;  Other entities , e.g. concept, object, event, and geographic name;  Search facility - suggest spelling correction based on patterns, rules, keywords, phonics, synonyms, dictionary, and controlled vocabulary within one dialogue box in a single interface. It will also suggest categories that would facilitate discovery based on statistical analysis of queries, documents, user profiles and activities, usage, and vocabulary services consumed from other vocabulary service providers;  Google Map API for geographic name 21
  22. 22. System Backend for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (Taxonomy Management Module) (4.4.b)  Link user services, collection management, circulation, acquisitions, cataloging, and other processes across the units of Library and University Resources  Maintain taxonomy in conformance to institution and industry standards  The CategoryMap will manage category terms which can be in a form of concept, object, event and place, harmonized from subject terms:  Clustered by an application;  Looked up through controlled vocabulary such as LCSH, MESH, and AAT;  Tagged by user-defined terms;  Structured by LC and Dewey classification;  Referenced directly from fund expenditure structure in acquisitions;  Analyzed based on usage statistics reports aggregated from circulation, content suppliers, etc., and no. of documents/objects likely carrying the category term;  Managed in a knowledge base for vocabulary filtering, mapping, ETL, etc., and in a data warehouse for data mining;  The search facility will also handle query processing in relational database management systems and ontological database management systems;  Relationships between concepts, objects, events, and geographic names are constructed according to controlled vocabularies developed by LC, NLM, and Getty. 22
  23. 23. 23
  24. 24. 24
  25. 25. 25 ER Diagram Adapted from RDA (Resource Description and Access) (4.5.b)
  26. 26. 26 DFD (Data Flow Diagram) (4.6)
  27. 27. 27 System Flow Chart for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.7.a)
  28. 28. 28 System Flow Chart for FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (4.7.b)
  29. 29. 29 System Flow for Data Movement of all Vocabularies
  30. 30. Role of Technical Services in FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (1) 1. Expand Content Selection to Unstructured Data on the Web 2. Leverage Named Entities Resolution Services Provided by OCLC WorldCat 3. Build Data Filters for Media and File Types 4. Build a Plug-in Reformat Utility 5. Build a Plug-in Meta-data Conversion Utility 6. Evaluate Change Management strategies, packages and techniques 30
  31. 31. Role of Technical Services in FocusOn Search and CategoryMap (2)  Parallel development  Global access to data  User engagement, behavior modeling & analysis  Leadership, communication, teamwork, collaboration, analytical skills, quality control, technology  Appropriate level of cataloging  Reuse 3rd-party bibliographic records  Promote new models of access through user experience  Integration, analysis, infrastructure 31
  32. 32. 32 Duggan, J., & Stang, D. B. (2008). Magic quadrant for software change and configuration management for distributed platforms, 2008. Gartner RAS Core Research Note, G00153962, 1-10. Hoffer, J. A., George, J. F., & Valacich, J. S. (2008). Modern systems analysis and design (5th ed. ed., pp. 130-159). New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. IMT (Information Management Team). “ER Diagram for RDA Taxonomy: High-Level Relationship Among Entities.” Available: http://www.rdaonline.org/ERDiagramRDA_24June2008.pdf Inmon, W.H. “Architecting for Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing: Integrating the Structured and Unstructured Data World.” Data Warehouse Seminar ‘08, sponsored by Data Management Forum, Dec. 8, 2008 Xu, Amanda (2000). “Beyond Seamless Access: Meta-data in the Age of Content Integration” – presented and led the discussion forum at the Spring Program, Information Technology Interest Group of ACRL, New England Chapter, Univ. of Connecticut, May 26, 2000. Xu, Amanda (2007). “Mending the Gap Between the Library’s Electronic and Print Collections on Library’s Web Site Using Semantic Web” – Presented for ExLibris Voyager End User Group Meeting, Chicago, Ill, April 19-20, 2007. Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA. RDA Element Analysis. 26 Oct. 2008: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/jsc/docs/5rda-elementanalysisrev2.pdf

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