Leadership for Rethinking
Web 2.0 & Mobility in
Schools
Empowering K-12 school district technology leaders to use technolo...
About CoSN
Mission
Serving K-12 technology leaders who through their
strategic use of technology, improve teaching and
lea...
Reimagine Learning
Young
People’s
Use of
Technology
Emerging
Technologies
Tools
School
Districts &
Technology
State of Today
Technology, Mobile Devices and Web 2.0
tools have pervasive presence in the lives
of young people.
Young People’s Use of Technology
Media use in a typical day for 8 – to 18- year-olds
Medium Time
(hours)
TV content 4:29
M...
Young People’s Use of Technology
Media Equipment Percentage
TV 99%
Computer 93%
Video game console 87%
Ipod/MP3 player 76%...
Young People’s Use of Technology
Activity Percentage
of Teens
Social Networking Services 73%
Search for news-current event...
One Year or Less
– Cloud Computing
– Mobiles
Emerging
Technologies
Two to Three Years
– Game-Based Learning
– Open Content...
Considerations forConsiderations for
Educational LeadersEducational Leaders
•How are schools and their leaders reacting to...
The nation’s district administrators are
overwhelming positive about the impact of
Web 2.0 & Mobile Devices on students’
l...
Web 2.0 & Mobile Devices in Schools
Over 75% of superintendents and curriculum directors agree
Web 2.0 holds potential val...
Mobile Devices & Web 2.0 tools
Keep students interested and
engaged in school.
School
Districts &
Technology
Educational Innovation +
Increase Access+ Budgetary
Concerns+ Open Attitude=
BYOD
School
Districts &
Technology
Leader Views
Value of Web 2.0 & Mobile Learning
1. Keep students interested and engaged in school
2. Meet the needs of dif...
Protect
Concern on how to
protect children
from harmful
content on the
Web. Preserve
Involves integrating
Web 2.0 applicat...
Protect?
The majority of district administrators
believe that student use of Web 2.0 should
be limited to participation on...
Protect? Access
n=3228 Superintendents, Curriculum Directors, and Technology Directors.
District administrators with speci...
Protect? Filtering
Nearly every school district in the U.S. has an Internet
filtering system. 55% are more restrictive tha...
Protect?
District administrators classified these problems as moderate to severe
Concern Percentage
Wasting time/distracti...
Preserve?
The majority of school districts allow
prescribed educational use for most of the
other Web 2.0 tools.
Percentage of technology directors reporting on Web 2.0
use allowed in their districts
n= 907 Technology Directors.
Preser...
Progress? Disruptive Change
Puts the organization in new path and
transforms it.
Disruptive change represents a break with...
Preserve?
The use of these tools in American
classrooms remains the province of
individual pioneering classrooms.
Progress?
Web 2.0 applications used in teaching materials, adopted by the district,
or specifically included in the distri...
What Stands in the Way?
School districts are more focused on dealing with the
problems of Web 2.0 than on challenges to le...
What Stands in the Way?
• Broadband
• Hardware
• Filtering
• Mobile Devices
• Parental/Citizen Concerns
• Organizational/ ...
Participatory Learning in Schools:
Policy and Leadership Initiative
Tool
s
Participatory Culture:
Building Blocks for School Leaders
Administrator’s Guide to Collaborative
Tools in K–12 Education
G...
Participatory Culture: Building Blocks
for School Leaders
Leading with Web 2.0
Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for
School Leaders
Learning with Web 2.0
Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for
School Leaders
Transformative Leadership with Web 2.0
Tool
s
Tips for Building Blocks
• Understand the educational potential of Web 2.0
• Improve personal productivity with Web 2.0 to...
CoSN, Leadership for Web 2.0 in Education: Promise and Reality,
2009
CoSN , Leadership for Mobile Learning, www.cosn.org/M...
Reimagine Learning:
Leading in a Time of Constant Change
March 5-7, 2012
Washington, DC
Call for Presentations 2012
Deadli...
Leadership for MobileLeadership for Mobile
LearningLearning
•An interactive web site
•Tools and resources for planning mob...
Leadership for MobileLeadership for Mobile
LearningLearning
• Highlight leadership, research, and best practices for
using...
Keith Krueger, CEO, CoSN
keith@cosn.org
Lucy Gray , Project Director, CoSN
lgray@cosn.org
Leadership for Rethinking Web 2.0 and Mobility in Education: Protect? Preserve? Progress?
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Leadership for Rethinking Web 2.0 and Mobility in Education: Protect? Preserve? Progress?

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Presentation given by Keith Krueger and Lucy Gray at the International Society of Educational Technology Conference on behalf of the Consortium for School Networking

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  • Core Value: The primary challenge we face in using technology effectively is human, not technical.
    Audience: Chief Technology Officers (CTOs)/Chief Information Officers (CIOs)/Technology Directors
    For that reason, CoSN focuses on Leadership and Policy.
  • Repeatedly we see the following drivers to reimagine learning. We have correlated our discussion today to these drivers. Are their more?
  • NATIONAL TECHNOLOGY PLAN -- To achieve our goal of transforming American education, we must rethink basic assumptions and redesign our education system. We must apply technology to implement personalized learning and ensure that students are making appropriate progress through our P–16 system so they graduate.
  • Young People: 8- to 18-year-old.
    The media consumption includes multitasking (time spent using more than one medium concurrently).
  • internet is a central and indispensable element in the lives of American teens .
    Share Content refers to teens sharing self‐created content online like photos, videos, artwork or stories.
    Students view the banning of mobile devices as the primary barrier to using technology at school. The focus has shifted away from internet filtering as being considered the primary barrier.
     
    A majority of parents indicate that if their child's school allowed mobile devices for learning, they would purchase such a device
  • You are most likely familiar with these two publications that are providing insights to the educational community at the district, state and federal levels.
    The NMC Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition is a publication of the New Media Consortium. The research behind The NMC Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition is a collaboration between the New Media Consortium, the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE).
  • Each year NMC identifies six emerging technologies or practices that are likely to enter mainstream use in the educational community within three adoption horizons over the next one to five years.
    Each report also presents critical trends and challenges that will affect teaching and learning over the same time frame. To identify these areas, the project has drawn on an ongoing conversation among knowledgeable persons in the fields of business, industry, and education; on published resources, current research, and practice; and on the expertise of members of the NMC Horizon Project’s K-12 advisory board, an international body of experts in education, technology, and other fields.
    This most recently released report provides insights to the drivers of digital learning in the short and long term, specifically cloud computing, mobiles, game based learning and open content. Each of which could be delivered via the cloud environment on a mobile handled.
    Cloud computing has already transformed the way users of the Internet think about computing and communication, data storage and access, and collaborative work.
    Cloud-based applications and services are available to many school students today, and more schools are employing cloud-based tools all the time. Now schools are looking to outsource significant parts of their infrastructure, such as email and backups, to cloud providers.
    Together, these developments have contributed considerably to the adoption of cloud computing approaches at K-12 schools across the globe.
    Mobiles are a category that defies long-term definitions. With more than 1.2 billion new mobile devices produced each year, the pace of innovation in the mobile markets is unprecedented.
    Mobiles, especially smartphones and tablets, enable ubiquitous access to information, social networks, tools for learning and productivity, and hundreds of thousands of custom applications. They were listed in previous years because they could capture multimedia, access the Internet, or geolocate.
    But now they are effectively specialized computers for the palm of your hand, with a huge and growing collection of software tools that make use of their accelerometers, compasses, cameras, microphones, GPS, and other sensors.
  • Two items for you to consider in our discussion today…..
  • NSSA6
  • 48% said some use in teaching and learning was present
    87% administrators disagreed with the statement that Web 2.0 has little to contribute to teaching and learning
    Source for last bullet point: Speak Up 2010, National Findings, April 2011
  • Administrators value mobile devices - the student engagement component (84 percent) and adding in the idea that the devices can extend learning beyond the school day (66 percent) or create opportunities for more personalized learning experiences (64 percent).
    Administrators Ranked number 1 of the National Priorities for Web 2.0- Keep students interested and engaged in school..
  • Due to a general interest in educational innovation, the dramatic increase in the access to mobile devices, budgetary concerns,  and a more open attitude to the potential of mobile devices, we're seeing increased interest in BYOD programs in school districts
  • Top three priorities for improving student learning through the use of Web 2.0:
    Keeping students interested and engaged in school.
    Meeting the needs of different kinds of learners
    Developing critical thinking skills.
    Curriculum directors identified four key content areas that they predicted would be most positively impacted by Web 2.0: social studies, writing, science, and reading.
    *Other options of lower priority to respondents and not listed above include: offer opportunities for students to create innovative products; build the capacity of students to function successfully on teams; provide opportunities for all students to voice ideas; document student progress over time (e.g., performance assessment); provide opportunities for community-based projects.
  • Three themes describe the way schools are contending with Web 2.0 in the classroom: protect, preserve and progress
  • Internet safety. Educators are struggling to balance the challenge of keeping students safe while realizing the potential of Web 2.0 for learning.
    Over 53% agreed that Web 2.0 has caused district policy makers to become nervous about allowing student access .
    Only 3% school districts have formal policies adopted specifically to address Web 2.0.
  • 60% say Web 2.0 use is guided by filtering student access
    55% say Web filtering system more restrictive than the required by the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA)
    42% say system adhered strictly to CIPA requirements.
  • Just list the items. Delete graph
  • Those who support this perspective (Preserve) do so either because they believe the curriculum is generally adequate and can handle new teaching techniques or because the digital applications will spark needed evolutionary changes to the status quo.
  • Technology issues were identified as critical barriers to restructuring. The issues include: a lack of adequate access to technology; a lack of reliable and robust Internet access; the continuing need for high-quality, ongoing professional development on effective uses of Web 2.0; and, a new mindset for embracing Web 2.0. Sample comments addressing each barrier follow.
  • -Broadband: there are relatively few school districts in the US that have adequate broadband connectivity to enable a full measure of access to Web 2.0 resources. SETDA reported in 2008 that the most schools are connected at or 1.54 Mbps compared to 5Mbps in households.
    -Hardware: 1:4 student-to-computer ratio, the data on hardware is self-reported and might include computer that are no accessible to students or working.
    -Filtering: Nearly every school district in the U.S. has an Internet Filtering. CIPA requires schools to filter or block access to inappropriate materials on the district network and to adopt a policy that addresses the safety of minors using e-mail, chat room and other forms of electronic communications.
    -Mobile Devices: 12% of teens with cell phones say that they can have a cell phone at their school at all times. 62%) say that they can have a cell phone at school but not in class, and another quarter of teens (24%) attend schools that forbid cell phones altogether. Concerns that cell phones will be distracting and/or access unsuitable content for minors.
    -Parental/ Citizen concerns: parents recognize the importance of their kids to know how to use web 2.0 tools, but were skeptic on the value for education. Increased media attention on cyberbulling, cheating, sexting make parents and citizens nervous about the use of web 2.0 in schools.
    -Organizational/ Professional Development: need for more professional development for teachers on computers, the Internet and Web 2.0 applications.
    For Mobile Devices: Administrators say that their top barriers to mobile learning implementation include focused professional development efforts and policies related to network security
    District – Level Leadership: District administrators, the persons responsible for decision making on Web 2.0 in schools, are more passive than active users in the Web 2.0 space.
  • The CoSN Participatory Learning n Schools: Policy and Leadership Initiative is based on the recognition that mobile devices and Web 2.0 tools provide powerful learning resources for our children and thus prepare them for the world beyond the classroom. The purpose of this initiative, is to assist schools to adapt to this new reality.
    District-level administrators have a critical role in understanding what digital media means for learning, in providing leadership for efforts to make the effective use of media the rule rather than the exception, and in providing a policy context that is conducive to the best that schools.
  • CoSN is developing resources, tools and guidance on Web 2.0 for superintendents and administrators, chief technology officers and technology professionals, and chief academic officers and curriculum directors.
    Coming soon, you’ll be able to find community resources to build support for Web 2.0 among teachers, parents and community members.
  • Resources, tools and guidance for school administrators to enable them to secure information specific to their own needs in using Web 2.0 for personal productivity; and for providing leadership in dealing with the policy and organizational issues to support use of digital media to transform learning. Specific resources for superintendents, curriculum & technology Leaders.
    http://www.cosn.org/web20/administratorsguide
    NOTE: The picture is hyperlinked. If you click the image during the presentation, it will take you the website.
  • Learning with Web 2.0
    Resources and tools for school leaders to inform their community about the value of digital media in their schools and to engage faculty, staff and parent communities in conversations about issues and opportunities that digital media provide.
    http://www.cosn.org/Initiatives/Web2/BuildingBlocks/LearningwithWeb20/tabid/7286/Default.aspx
    NOTE: The picture is hyperlinked. If you click the image during the presentation, it will take you the website.
    http://www.cosn.org/Initiatives/Web2/BuildingBlocks/LearningwithWeb20/tabid/7286/Default.aspx
  • Online assessment tool for school leaders to help district level administrators identify their level of engagement in becoming a Transformative Leader with Web 2.0. The assessment tool also provides links to relevant information for needs identified by self-assessment.
    http://www.cosn.org/Initiatives/Web2/BuildingBlocks/TransformativeLeadership/tabid/7287/Default.aspx
    NOTE: The picture is hyperlinked. If you click the image during the presentation, it will take you the website.
  • Web 2.0 applications and mobile Internet devices have added new issues to the safety/access situation for schools. The purpose of this guide is to assist school districts in developing, rethinking, or revising Internet policies as a consequence of the emergence of Web 2.0, and the growing pervasiveness of smart phone use. The CoSN Policy Guide addresses these questions:
  • This online guide will help school administrators :
    -Understand the educational potential of Web 2.0
    -Improve your personal productivity with Web 2.0 tools
    -Understand your role as a superintendent or administrator, chief technology officer or technology professional, or chief academic officer or curriculum director
    -Take action to use Web 2.0 to transform teaching and learning
  • NASSP board encourages school leaders to model the appropriate and responsible use of mobile and social technologies; lead the conversation around connectivity and involve students in the creation of policies; and promote one-to-one access to connectible devices, including students’ own devices, for anytime-anywhere learning. Sensitive to the potential pitfalls of these technologies, the NASSP board--all current principals and assistant principals--encourages schools to incorporate prevention guidelines regarding misuse, such as cyberbullying and sexting, into the student code of conduct, and participate in and provide teachers with professional development on the effective use of mobile devices and networking in schools. With this position statement as a platform, NASSP is currently developing such professional development programs for school leaders.
    The position statement further acknowledges that schools need support to integrate these technologies properly. The NASSP board encourages districts to articulate clear technology policies that give schools the latitude to connect without fear of undue consequences and to reduce Internet filtering to maximize student access to online learning tools. The board also calls on policymakers to provide a funding stream to ensure broadband infrastructure and mobile learning devices for all students; to enact reasonable policies that clarify the legal liability of school officials; and to involve school leaders in the conversations that inform policies designed to curtail and punish online harassment.
  • Two items for you to consider in our discussion today…..
  • Leadership for Rethinking Web 2.0 and Mobility in Education: Protect? Preserve? Progress?

    1. 1. Leadership for Rethinking Web 2.0 & Mobility in Schools Empowering K-12 school district technology leaders to use technology strategically to improve teaching and learning. ISTE Annual Conference Philadelphia, PA June 27, 2011
    2. 2. About CoSN Mission Serving K-12 technology leaders who through their strategic use of technology, improve teaching and learning. Core Value The primary challenge we face in using technology effectively is human, not technical. Audience Chief Technology Officers (CTOs)/Chief Information Officers (CIOs)/Technology Directors For that reason, CoSN focuses on Leadership and Policy. 2
    3. 3. Reimagine Learning Young People’s Use of Technology Emerging Technologies Tools School Districts & Technology
    4. 4. State of Today Technology, Mobile Devices and Web 2.0 tools have pervasive presence in the lives of young people.
    5. 5. Young People’s Use of Technology Media use in a typical day for 8 – to 18- year-olds Medium Time (hours) TV content 4:29 Music/audio 2:31 Cell Phone (talking & txt) 2:08 Computer 1:29 Video Game 1:13 Print :38 Movies :25 Total Media Exposure w/ Multitasking 7:38
    6. 6. Young People’s Use of Technology Media Equipment Percentage TV 99% Computer 93% Video game console 87% Ipod/MP3 player 76% Cell phone 75% Handheld video game player 59% Laptop 29% Media ownership for 8 – to 18- year-olds
    7. 7. Young People’s Use of Technology Activity Percentage of Teens Social Networking Services 73% Search for news-current events and politics 62% Share content 38% Search for health information 31% Remix 21% Blogging 14% Virtual worlds 8% Tweet 8% Online Activity for Teens
    8. 8. One Year or Less – Cloud Computing – Mobiles Emerging Technologies Two to Three Years – Game-Based Learning – Open Content Four to Five Years – Learning Analytics – Personalized Learning Environments
    9. 9. Considerations forConsiderations for Educational LeadersEducational Leaders •How are schools and their leaders reacting to Web 2.0 and Mobility? •Do we have the leadership, vision and policies in place to effectively leverage these trends to reimagine learning?
    10. 10. The nation’s district administrators are overwhelming positive about the impact of Web 2.0 & Mobile Devices on students’ lives and their education. School Districts & Technology
    11. 11. Web 2.0 & Mobile Devices in Schools Over 75% of superintendents and curriculum directors agree Web 2.0 holds potential value for teaching and learning. More positive about the potential of Web 2.0 for high schools and middle schools rather than elementary schools. 56% reported that Web 2.0 applications have not yet been integrated within the curriculum. Teachers and administrators voice strong support for the potential benefits of mobile devices within instruction.
    12. 12. Mobile Devices & Web 2.0 tools Keep students interested and engaged in school. School Districts & Technology
    13. 13. Educational Innovation + Increase Access+ Budgetary Concerns+ Open Attitude= BYOD School Districts & Technology
    14. 14. Leader Views Value of Web 2.0 & Mobile Learning 1. Keep students interested and engaged in school 2. Meet the needs of different kinds of learners 3. Develop students capabilities not possible through traditional methods 4. Provide alternative learning environments for students 5. Extend learning beyond the school day
    15. 15. Protect Concern on how to protect children from harmful content on the Web. Preserve Involves integrating Web 2.0 applications with the curriculum and pedagogy. Progress Schools need to change in order to become compatible with a changed world. Web 2.0 Tools in the Classroom
    16. 16. Protect? The majority of district administrators believe that student use of Web 2.0 should be limited to participation on approved educational websites. School Districts & Technology
    17. 17. Protect? Access n=3228 Superintendents, Curriculum Directors, and Technology Directors. District administrators with specific positions on access to Web 2.0 in schools
    18. 18. Protect? Filtering Nearly every school district in the U.S. has an Internet filtering system. 55% are more restrictive than the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) requires. Effectiveness of Filtering – 8% say virtually 100% effectively – 67% say filtering is very effective, but things slip through – 13% say the best we can find, but students find ways around it – 12% filtering system is too strict it often impedes instruction School Districts & Technology
    19. 19. Protect? District administrators classified these problems as moderate to severe Concern Percentage Wasting time/distraction 75% Making inappropriate contacts with strangers 27% Use of non-authoritative or biased sources 56% Inappropriate or rude online social interactions 54% Accessing inappropriate materials 53% Students giving out personal information 53% Posting inappropriate pictures or media 48% Cheating/plagiarism 48% Cyber bullying 45% Using technology to cheat in other ways 43% Inappropriate entries/use 41%
    20. 20. Preserve? The majority of school districts allow prescribed educational use for most of the other Web 2.0 tools.
    21. 21. Percentage of technology directors reporting on Web 2.0 use allowed in their districts n= 907 Technology Directors. Preserve?
    22. 22. Progress? Disruptive Change Puts the organization in new path and transforms it. Disruptive change represents a break with the way an organization structures policies, practices, roles and rules.
    23. 23. Preserve? The use of these tools in American classrooms remains the province of individual pioneering classrooms.
    24. 24. Progress? Web 2.0 applications used in teaching materials, adopted by the district, or specifically included in the district's formal curriculum.
    25. 25. What Stands in the Way? School districts are more focused on dealing with the problems of Web 2.0 than on challenges to leverage Web 2.0 for learning. Many district administrators said that educators in their districts were not sufficiently familiar with Web 2.0 to understand it fully, much less ready to redesign schooling.
    26. 26. What Stands in the Way? • Broadband • Hardware • Filtering • Mobile Devices • Parental/Citizen Concerns • Organizational/ Professional Development • District – Level Leadership • District Policies
    27. 27. Participatory Learning in Schools: Policy and Leadership Initiative Tool s
    28. 28. Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for School Leaders Administrator’s Guide to Collaborative Tools in K–12 Education Goal Help school administrators foster participatory learning and support system changes in the school culture through the use of digital media.
    29. 29. Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for School Leaders Leading with Web 2.0
    30. 30. Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for School Leaders Learning with Web 2.0
    31. 31. Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for School Leaders Transformative Leadership with Web 2.0
    32. 32. Tool s
    33. 33. Tips for Building Blocks • Understand the educational potential of Web 2.0 • Improve personal productivity with Web 2.0 tools • Understand role of leaders (supt’s, curriculum and technology) • Use Web 2.0 to transform teaching and learning
    34. 34. CoSN, Leadership for Web 2.0 in Education: Promise and Reality, 2009 CoSN , Leadership for Mobile Learning, www.cosn.org/MobileLead CoSN, Participatory Culture: Building Blocks for School Leaders, 2010 www.cosn.org/buildingblocks Department of Education, National Education Technology Plan, Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology, 2010 Kaiser Family Foundation, Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-Year-Olds, 2010 Project Tomorrow, Speak Up 2010, National Findings, April 2011 Sources
    35. 35. Reimagine Learning: Leading in a Time of Constant Change March 5-7, 2012 Washington, DC Call for Presentations 2012 Deadline for Presentation Submission July 8, 2011, 6pm (ET) To Start your Presentation Proposal go to: www.cosn.org/CFP
    36. 36. Leadership for MobileLeadership for Mobile LearningLearning •An interactive web site •Tools and resources for planning mobile programs •News updates •Case studies of exemplary mobile programs •Video interviews •Speaker bureau materials
    37. 37. Leadership for MobileLeadership for Mobile LearningLearning • Highlight leadership, research, and best practices for using mobile learning devices as an effective tool in teaching and learning • Identify district policies that hinder the effective deployment of mobile learning devices • Develop strategies and tools for the successful deployment of mobile learning technologies in school districts
    38. 38. Keith Krueger, CEO, CoSN keith@cosn.org Lucy Gray , Project Director, CoSN lgray@cosn.org

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