Instructional Design Models and Theories: Classical Conditioning

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1903 - Ivan Pavlov discovers Classical Conditioning Theory, while conducting research on the digestive system of dogs. Later classical conditioning theory was applied to humans by John B. Watson. Check the following article and presentation to find more. If you are interested to learn more about Classical Conditioning Theory please check: http://elearningindustry.com/classical-conditioning

Last but not least, you are more than welcome to embed the Classical Conditioning presentation at your site of blog.

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  • Join us at the Instructional Design History Journey. A New Instructional Design Model Will Be Added Every Week!
    Find more at: http://elearningindustry.com/instructional-design-models-and-theories

    If you are interested to learn more about Classical Conditioning Theory please check: http://elearningindustry.com/classical-conditioning

    Last but not least, you are more than welcome to embed the Classical Conditioning presentation at your site of blog.
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Instructional Design Models and Theories: Classical Conditioning

  1. 1. Instructional Design Models and Theories Classical Conditioning
  2. 2. Christopher Pappas Founder of the eLearning Industry's Network elearningindustry.com •eLearning Consultant and Analyst in various USA and EU organizations. •eLearning Blogger at eLearningIndustry.com •M.B.A. & M.Ed. from BGSU, Ohio, USA. If I can be valauable to you do not hesitate to contact me •https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopherpappas •https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ChristopherPappas/posts •https://twitter.com/cpappas •https://www.facebook.com/christoforos.pappas
  3. 3. Instructional Design Models and Theories Join us at the Instructional Design History Journey A New Instructional Design Model Will Be Added Every Week! Find more at: Instructional Design Models and Theories http://elearningindustry.com/instructional-design-models-and-theories
  4. 4. 1903 - Ivan Pavlov discovers Classical Conditioning Theory, while conducting research on the digestive system of dogs.
  5. 5. Objectives Classical Conditioning • Which are the Principles of Classical Conditioning • Which are the Stages of Classical Conditioning
  6. 6. Associative Learning Classical Conditioning • The Classical Conditioning theory involved adopting a new behavior through the process of association. Operant Conditioning • The Operant Conditioning theory involves the use of reinforcement or punishment to maximize or minimize a certain behavior.
  7. 7. Section 1 The 4 Principles of Classical Conditioning
  8. 8. The Principles of Classical Conditioning 1. Unconditioned Stimulus (UCS) The unconditioned stimulus is the one that automatically triggers a response. 2. Unconditioned Response (UCR) The unconditioned response is the unintentional reaction that occurs when a person is triggered by the unconditioned stimulus. 3. Conditioned Stimulus (CS) The conditioned stimulus is the neutral signal that, after being paired with the unconditioned stimulus, triggers the conditioned response. 4. Conditioned Response (CR) The conditioned response is the learned response to the neutral signal.
  9. 9. Section 2 The 3 Stages of Classical Conditioning
  10. 10. The Stages of Classical Conditioning 1. Before Conditioning The unconditioned stimulus generates an unconditioned, unlearned, natural response. For example, overconsumption of alcohol (UCS) produces a response nausea (USR). At this stage, there is also another stimulus that doesn’t affect the person and is neutral (NS). This NS does not produce a response until it’s associated with the UCS. 2. During Conditioning A stimulus that produces no response (i.e. neutral) is paired with the unconditioned stimulus and becomes a conditioned stimulus (CS). For example, a stomach virus (UCS) might be associated with a certain food (CS). During this stage the UCS must usually be paired with the CS on a number of occasions before learning takes place. 3. After Conditioning The conditioned stimulus is associated with the unconditioned stimulus and generates a new conditioned response. For example, if alcohol has made us sick, it produces a response of nausea.
  11. 11. Classical Conditioning Theory Find more at: Classical Conditioning Theory
  12. 12. Free eLearning Resources Top 10 e-Learning Statistics for 2014 You Need To Know http://elearningindustry.com/top-10-e-learning-statistics-for-2014-you-need-to-know Awesome e-Learning Course Guide http://elearningindustry.com/awesome-e-learning-course-guide The Free eBook: How to become an eLearning Professional http://elearningindustry.com/the-free-ebook-how-to-become-an-elearning-professional Over 1000 Free eLearning Resources http://elearningindustry.com/over-1000-free-elearning-resources

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