Introduction to-diction

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Introduction to-diction

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO DICTION
  2. 2. What is the difference between the words HOUSE and HOME? <ul><li>What are the feelings or images that come to mind with each word? </li></ul>
  3. 3. mommy, mom, ma, birth mother, mama, maternal parent <ul><li>What do all of the words have in common? </li></ul><ul><li>-They all refer to… </li></ul><ul><li>What are the feelings or images that come to mind with each word? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Words have both a denotative and a connotative meaning. <ul><li>Denotation means the explicit or direct meaning of a word; the dictionary definition. </li></ul><ul><li>Connotation means the associated meaning of a word; the feelings or images that the word evokes. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Your turn: Think of some other word sets that have both a denotative and connotative meaning. Write them down and then brainstorm feelings or images that come to mind with each. <ul><li>Father, … </li></ul><ul><li>Red, … </li></ul><ul><li>Cool, … </li></ul><ul><li>_____, … </li></ul>
  6. 6. W o r d s a r e l i k e a b o x o f c r a y o n s : <ul><li>Think about names of colors in a Crayola box… Kids choose colors to reflect the mood or feeling they want to create in their artwork. Certain shades of colors evoke different feelings and emotions. </li></ul><ul><li>Similarly, words have shadings of meaning. Like an artist choosing a particular color, a writer chooses particular words. The words are not haphazard or random, but chosen carefully, full of connotative meaning. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Diction means word choice. <ul><li>Pay attention to the different shadings that a word may have. One word can alter a sentence dramatically. </li></ul><ul><li>When we look at the word choice of an author, we are looking at the author's diction. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Language formality scale <ul><li>Learned Popular C olloquial S lang </li></ul>Most formal Least formal
  9. 9. The basic elements of everyday communication <ul><li>Popular </li></ul><ul><li>(common to the speech of the educated and the uneducated alike) </li></ul><ul><li>Agree----------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Begin-----------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Clear-----------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Disagree------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>End-------------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Help------------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Make easy----------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Secret----------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Think-----------------------------  </li></ul><ul><li>Wordy----------------------------  </li></ul>Learned (used more widely by the educated and in more formal occasions) Concur -------------------------------------- Commence --------------------------------- Lucid ------------------------------------------ Remonstrate ---------------------------- Terminate --------------------------------- Succor --------------------------------------- Facilitate ---------------------------------- Esoteric ------------------------------------- Cogitate ------------------------------------ Verbose --------------------------------------
  10. 10. colloquialisms <ul><li>Writing as friendly conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Highly informal </li></ul><ul><li>What audience is appropriate for using such diction? </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Any Contractions, any shortened words, “kind of”, “like”, “mad” (angry), “yeah”, “Sure” (certainly), “it’s me” </li></ul>
  11. 11. Slang <ul><li>Least formal—its use is determined by the audience/occasion </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfies a desire for novelty of expression </li></ul><ul><li>Used by everyone at one time or another </li></ul><ul><li>Shifting the diction to slang may create a humorous effect or the impression of a lack of control over the writing (usually the latter) </li></ul>
  12. 12. Poetic Diction <ul><li>language used in poetry </li></ul><ul><li>vocabulary, phrasing, and usage appropriate for verse (writing with rhyme and meter) </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry goes full-force into the sound, rhythms and structures of language. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Examples of Poetic Diction <ul><li>“ in the icy silence of the tomb” </li></ul><ul><li>“ A slumber did my spirit seal; / I had no human fears: / She seemed a thing that could not feel / The touch of earthly years.” </li></ul>
  14. 14. Non- examples of Poetic Diction <ul><li>swimming fish </li></ul><ul><li>melting ice </li></ul><ul><li>boring poem </li></ul><ul><li>barking dog </li></ul>

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