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April 2, 2015, BEACON NEWSPAPER • 3
POLICE BLOTTER
(Continued on Page 5)
Lindenhurst tackles drug problem
through Parent Prevention Forum
by Emily Moran and Eileen Interiano
On a chilly February night, residents from the
Lindenhurst community gathered to learn how
they can combat the drug epidemic plaguing their
community, as well as every other community on
Long Island, through education, early intervention
and treatment.
The Lindenhurst Community Cares Coalition
(LCCC) facilitated a Parent Prevention Forum
Thurs., Feb. 26 featuring a Narcan training course
and the “Shed the Meds” program. Also, free drug
testing kits from the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office
and many other tables with pamphlets were avail-
able for participants to take home.
The Coalition began in June 2013 with the goal of
educating parents about drug and substance preven-
tion. The organization holds a forum annually.
“I had gone to the West Babylon Coalition meet-
ing and I was so inspired,” said Judy Raimondi, pres-
ident and founder of LCCC. “The next day I called
the first precinct and I wanted to know, what can I
do? And they said, start a coalition.”
 The goal of the group is for early intervention to
protect children from becoming exposed to the in-
fluence of the drug culture. Raimondi said the group
also helps to educate parents to be proactive with
their children.
“We don’t have to be afraid to have the conversa-
tion (about drug and alcohol)” she said.
Recovering addicts and their parents shared trau-
matic stories about how addiction had affected their
lives.
“I lost everything,” said Alexandra A., who start-
ed drinking at 12 and later smoked marijuana. “I
couldn’t keep my job anymore and I didn’t have a
car. My friends and family wouldn’t talk to me any-
more. I was constantly getting hospitalized and ar-
rested. I had no purpose in life anymore.”
She credits her involvement with Alcoholics
Anonymous with saving her life.
But the struggle was not an easy one. It took a se-
ries of relapses and different rehab centers for Alex-
andra to turn her life around. She has been sober for
two years and three months.
“When you feel like there is nothing left and no
one’s there to help you anymore, there are people
there,” said Alexandra. “Sober is the cool thing to-
day… I have such a beautiful life today with beauti-
ful relationships with such wonderful people.”
America’s drug problem does not start in
our  streets,  it starts in our medicine cabinets, ac-
cording to the National Survey on Drug Use and
Health (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Ser-
vices Administration). The report also shows that
approximately 2,500 young people between 12 and
17 years of age abuse a prescription painkiller for
the first time, and that four out of the top five drugs
abused by 12th graders are prescription or non-pre-
scription medications.
 To help combat this epidemic, the Suffolk County
Sheriff’s Office has a program known as “Shed the
Meds,” which was discussed at the forum.
“We take expired medications—you don’t want
them around the house,” said Deputy Hornick. Un-
der the program, residents bring their old medica-
tions to certain locations. “We take them, we seal
them and they are in police custody and are taken to
Above, residents listen to presentation from one
of the speakers. At left, shown are organizers
and supporters of the event.
The Suffolk County Police Department’s First
Precinct and other local fire and law enforcement
agencies report the following incidents:
ARSON
Copiague: On March 14, at about 8:54 p.m. po-
lice and local firefighters responded to a car fire
on Oak Street West. Police said the 2013 Hummer
involved may have been set ablaze intentionally.
An investigation is underway.
BURGLARY
Deer Park: Three men burst into an occupied
home at about 12:50 a.m. on March 14. One of
the men is said to have brandished a gun, anoth-
er took out a knife. The three thieves stole video
games before fleeing the scene.
Copiague: Undisclosed amounts of cash and
jewelry were stolen from a Maple Court home
sometime prior to 2 p.m., March 14.
Lindenhurst: Entering a South Pecan Street
home through a window, a thief or thieves got
into the home and stole undisclosed amounts
of money and jewelry. Police said the theft took
place sometime before 8 a.m., March 17.
GRAND LARCENY
West Babylon: A 1999 Ford parked on 18th Street
was stolen sometime before 6 a.m. on March 14.
•Someone stole a 2014 Toyota parked on 14th
Street. The theft occurred sometime before 9:30
p.m., March 16.
Wyandanch: On March 13 sometime before 5
p.m. someone removed the catalytic converter
from a 2011 Ford parked on Kean Street.
•Police were called March 16 at about 12:25
p.m. to Kean Street after it was discovered that
the catalytic converters from two 2014 Fords had
been stolen.
•A third incident on Kean Street involving the
theft of a catalytic converter occurred shortly be-
fore 5 a.m. on March 14. The vehicle in question
was a 2010 Ford.
North Lindenhurst: After breaking a side win-
dow of a 2014 Chevy parked on North Wellwood
Avenue someone reached in and removed a purse
that had been left in the car. The incident oc-
curred on March 19 sometime before 9 p.m.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF
Copiague: Someone smashed the windshield of
a 2001 Hyundai parked on North Emerson Av-
enue the afternoon of March 14.
Lindenhurst: Police were called March 16 af-
ter someone broke a window on a 2003 Mercury
parked on Bristol Street. The incident took place
sometime before 6 p.m.
Deer Park: A window at a West 4th Street home
was broken by an unknown assailant March 11.
Police were notified of the incident on March 18.
•On March 19 sometime before 10 a.m. some-
one smashed a window at a Conklin Street home.
 ARRESTS
DWI: The following persons have been arrested
and charged with driving while intoxicated or im-
paired: Ruben Usuachi, 41, of 55 Washington St.,
East Farmingdale; Shyasia Easley, 22, of 17 Hill-
top La., Wheatley Heights; Andre Knowles, 54, of
1 Maple Dr., North Lindenhurst;
 Petit Larceny: Richard Hilpert, 43, of 18 New
St., Massapequa; Christopher Collins, 25, of 529
Wellington Rd., West Hempstead; William Roe-
ill, 50, of 310 Hawkins Blvd., Copiague; Lorraine
(Continued on Page 5)
(Continued from Page 3)
POLICE BLOTTER
West Babylon Senior High School’s talented cast and
crew drew a full house on the opening night perfor-
mance of “The Wizard of Oz” on Feb. 27.
Under the direction of Joseph Barone, Musical Di-
rector MaryAnn Cafiero, Orchestra Conductor Dana
Wizard of Oz plays to a packed auditorium
Meadows and Choreogra-
pher Mary Napoli, the cast
and crew amused the audi-
ence with this iconic tale
about Dorothy (Alexa Luc-
chesse) and her dog Toto,
who embark on a journey to
theEmeraldCitytomeetthe
Wizard (Michael Grosso).
On their way, they meet a
Scarecrow (Matthew Light-
sey), Tin Man (Thaddeus
Plezia) and Cowardly Lion
(Marek Ardito-Proulx).
The Wizard instructs them
to bring him the broom of
the Wicked Witch of the
West (Angeline Meller) be-
fore he will help Dorothy
return home, and in several
instances, they meet Glinda
(Paige Leddy), who helps
them realize “there’s no place like home.”
“The musical was challenging,” Mr. Barone said.
“But the cast presented a strong and excellent delivery
of the story which was extremely entertaining and one
the audience will not forget.”
From left, West Babylon Senior High School
thespians, Matthew Lightsey (Scarecrow), Al-
exa Lucchesse (Dorothy) and Marek Ardito-
Proulx (Cowardly Lion) impressed the com-
munity during the production of “The Wizard
of Oz.”
Photo provided by West
Babylon School District
April 2, 2015, BEACON NEWSPAPER • 5
by Liam Henry
For all intents and purposes, Copiague basketball is
back.
Inanareawherebasketballgreatnessisknowntocome
from, the only problem was that it was known for origi-
nating from the school that is two miles to the southwest
Amityville.
Turn the page to 2014-15. The book might as well be
completely rewritten.
Betweentheboysandgirlsteams,theyhada34-8com-
binedrecord,andbothmadeittotheirrespectiveCounty
playoff semifinals.
“I really liked how we came together as a team,” said
QuandellButler.“Itdidn’tfeellikeabasketballteam;itfelt
morelikeafamily.Weworkedhardeachandeverydayto
push each other to our limits and progress as a team.”
The boys squad went 16-5 on the season after going
11-3 during conference play, and earned the sixth seed in
the Suffolk County Class AA playoffs.
TheEaglespunchedtheirticketintotheCountysemifi-
nals with wins over No. 11 Half Hollow Hills East and an
upset on the road over third-seeded Central Islip to meet
up with No. 2 Half Hollow Hills West at Farmingdale
State College.
The semifinal was a tight battle of two solid teams. Co-
piague and HHH West were tied at 13 after one quarter,
but the Eagles went on a run and earned a nine-point ad-
vantage heading into halftime. However, from that point
on, the Colts defense locked down and held Copiague to
only 20 second-half points. HHH West would go on to
outscore the Eagles, 36-20, in the second half to claim the
64-57 victory, and finish Copiague’s season.
“It was a tough loss,” said Butler. “Both teams played
hard, but unfortunately we didn’t come out on top.”
On the season, Prince Hickson led the team in scor-
ingwithover19pointspergame.KevinRobertsaveraged
17.4 and Elijah Rogers averaged 11.2 points to round out
thedouble-digitscorers.QuandellButlerfinishedthesea-
son averaging 7.3 points per game.
“I felt I had a good season,” said the senior Butler. “I’m
going to continue to work on my game to be successful
on the next level.”
Copiague boys and girls complete stellar season in semifinals
As for the girls, the season was equally a success.
The girls went an astounding 18-3 on the season after
going a perfect 14-0 in conference action. Their success
in the regular season earned them the third seed in the in
the Suffolk County Class AA playoffs.
The Eagles made it into the County semifinals with a
winoverNo.14HalfHollowHillsEastandabigwinover
sixth-seed Kings Park. The latter topped Copiague by 20
points early on in the season. The victory over Kings Park
sent Copiague to the semifinals to meet up with No. 2
Commack at Longwood High School.
“WelostourleadingscorerMakiayaMoore,andevery-
one thought we couldn’t go far without her,” said Mikal
Knight. "We just wanted to prove everyone wrong.”
ThesemifinaldidnotquiteworkoutthewaytheEagles
had intended. Commack jumped out to a fast 23-11 lead
attheendofthefirstquarter.TheCougarswouldaddonto
their lead by outscoring Copiague, 16-14, in the second
quarter to grab hold of a 39-25 halftime advantage. The
second half was much of the same as Commack added
to their lead in the third, and then finally claimed a 70-48
victory to cap the Eagles’ season.
“We didn’t play tough the whole game,” Knight said.
“They also played good man defense and ran us off the
three-point line.”
Fortheseason,MolloyCollege-boundIhnacinseGrady
ledtheteaminscoringwithan18.3pointspergameaver-
age. Emilyae Ward completed her freshman season with
a 12.4 average. Anna Zaborowska (8.5), Knight (7.9) and
Ashley Harris (7.8) each highly contributed to the Eagles'
success in the 2014-15 campaign.
“I think I stepped up from last season,” said Knight.
“Just becoming more of a threat then I was last season,
and being consistent.”
Despite transition, it still appears that Copiague boys
andgirlsbasketballisstillonitsway,butthereisnoshort-
age of pride in Copiague hoops.
“I was very blessed to be able to be apart of Copiague
basketball,” said Butler.
a medical incinerator where they get destroyed.”
The Sheriff’s Office has other drug prevention re-
sources available to families of teens. “We have drug
testing kits for parents. These are at-home kits, they
don’t have to be sent out; gives you an instant read-
ing in case you fear that one of your children has a
drug problem,” said Hornick.
The kits are also available at drugstores at a cost of
approximately $30 each.
 Another resource that was available at the forum
was a Narcan training course. Narcan is a medica-
tion used to counter the effects of opioid overdoses.
It is administered through a nasal spray. The class
teaches members of the community how to use the
drug safely and effectively.
“In 2007, the New York State Department of
Health made it legal for community-based orga-
nizations to do this type of training and dispense,”
said Tina Wolf, executive director for Community
Action for Social Justice.
Deputy  Hornick  said  Narcan  can  save lives be-
cause it reacts with the drug immediately. “If you’re
overdosing and you’re going to die, the Narcan can
stop it cold.”
  The drug works for about a half hour, enough
time to get the patient to a hospital. “It’s a new tool
that we have,” he said.
People reacted to the sensitive topics discussed at
the forum. Councilman Tony Martinez of Town of
Babylon said that he learned that an introduction to
a substance at an early age can lead to addiction.
“As a parent, that really concerns me,” he said.
“I started thinking about my two boys, Tomas and
Nicholas. I remember going to high school and hav-
ing a health class that scared me a lot. It prevented
me from trying some of those substances because I
was scared to die.”  
Wolf said young people do not always realize that
drug use can ruin their lives and even cause their
death. “You just don’t think quite in those terms
when you’re young,” she said.
For information on the Lindenhurst Community
Cares Coalition, visit their website at  www.lindy-
cares.org. For information on the Suffolk County
Sheriff’s  Shed  the Meds initiative, visit www.suf-
folkcountyny.gov/sheriff/CommunityPrograms/
ShedTheMeds. For information on Community
Action for Social Justice, visit www.nysocialjustice.
org.
Lindenhurst tackles
drug problem
(Continued from Page 3)
LaGasse, 34, of 309 Sherbrolke Rd., Lindenhurst;
Nicole Norelius, 23, of 320 48th St., Lindenhurst;
Ardella Mae Page, 55, of 27 Andress Plaza, North
Amityville; Jose Moradelos-Santos, 25, homeless.
 
The charges against those arrested are allegations,
and the cases are still pending in the courts. Indi-
viduals charged and whose names appear in this
column may submit documentation to us at a later
date that the charges have been dismissed or that
they have been found innocent and we will include
that information in this space in a timely manner.

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Lindenhurst_tackles

  • 1. April 2, 2015, BEACON NEWSPAPER • 3 POLICE BLOTTER (Continued on Page 5) Lindenhurst tackles drug problem through Parent Prevention Forum by Emily Moran and Eileen Interiano On a chilly February night, residents from the Lindenhurst community gathered to learn how they can combat the drug epidemic plaguing their community, as well as every other community on Long Island, through education, early intervention and treatment. The Lindenhurst Community Cares Coalition (LCCC) facilitated a Parent Prevention Forum Thurs., Feb. 26 featuring a Narcan training course and the “Shed the Meds” program. Also, free drug testing kits from the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office and many other tables with pamphlets were avail- able for participants to take home. The Coalition began in June 2013 with the goal of educating parents about drug and substance preven- tion. The organization holds a forum annually. “I had gone to the West Babylon Coalition meet- ing and I was so inspired,” said Judy Raimondi, pres- ident and founder of LCCC. “The next day I called the first precinct and I wanted to know, what can I do? And they said, start a coalition.”  The goal of the group is for early intervention to protect children from becoming exposed to the in- fluence of the drug culture. Raimondi said the group also helps to educate parents to be proactive with their children. “We don’t have to be afraid to have the conversa- tion (about drug and alcohol)” she said. Recovering addicts and their parents shared trau- matic stories about how addiction had affected their lives. “I lost everything,” said Alexandra A., who start- ed drinking at 12 and later smoked marijuana. “I couldn’t keep my job anymore and I didn’t have a car. My friends and family wouldn’t talk to me any- more. I was constantly getting hospitalized and ar- rested. I had no purpose in life anymore.” She credits her involvement with Alcoholics Anonymous with saving her life. But the struggle was not an easy one. It took a se- ries of relapses and different rehab centers for Alex- andra to turn her life around. She has been sober for two years and three months. “When you feel like there is nothing left and no one’s there to help you anymore, there are people there,” said Alexandra. “Sober is the cool thing to- day… I have such a beautiful life today with beauti- ful relationships with such wonderful people.” America’s drug problem does not start in our  streets,  it starts in our medicine cabinets, ac- cording to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Ser- vices Administration). The report also shows that approximately 2,500 young people between 12 and 17 years of age abuse a prescription painkiller for the first time, and that four out of the top five drugs abused by 12th graders are prescription or non-pre- scription medications.  To help combat this epidemic, the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office has a program known as “Shed the Meds,” which was discussed at the forum. “We take expired medications—you don’t want them around the house,” said Deputy Hornick. Un- der the program, residents bring their old medica- tions to certain locations. “We take them, we seal them and they are in police custody and are taken to Above, residents listen to presentation from one of the speakers. At left, shown are organizers and supporters of the event. The Suffolk County Police Department’s First Precinct and other local fire and law enforcement agencies report the following incidents: ARSON Copiague: On March 14, at about 8:54 p.m. po- lice and local firefighters responded to a car fire on Oak Street West. Police said the 2013 Hummer involved may have been set ablaze intentionally. An investigation is underway. BURGLARY Deer Park: Three men burst into an occupied home at about 12:50 a.m. on March 14. One of the men is said to have brandished a gun, anoth- er took out a knife. The three thieves stole video games before fleeing the scene. Copiague: Undisclosed amounts of cash and jewelry were stolen from a Maple Court home sometime prior to 2 p.m., March 14. Lindenhurst: Entering a South Pecan Street home through a window, a thief or thieves got into the home and stole undisclosed amounts of money and jewelry. Police said the theft took place sometime before 8 a.m., March 17. GRAND LARCENY West Babylon: A 1999 Ford parked on 18th Street was stolen sometime before 6 a.m. on March 14. •Someone stole a 2014 Toyota parked on 14th Street. The theft occurred sometime before 9:30 p.m., March 16. Wyandanch: On March 13 sometime before 5 p.m. someone removed the catalytic converter from a 2011 Ford parked on Kean Street. •Police were called March 16 at about 12:25 p.m. to Kean Street after it was discovered that the catalytic converters from two 2014 Fords had been stolen. •A third incident on Kean Street involving the theft of a catalytic converter occurred shortly be- fore 5 a.m. on March 14. The vehicle in question was a 2010 Ford. North Lindenhurst: After breaking a side win- dow of a 2014 Chevy parked on North Wellwood Avenue someone reached in and removed a purse that had been left in the car. The incident oc- curred on March 19 sometime before 9 p.m. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF Copiague: Someone smashed the windshield of a 2001 Hyundai parked on North Emerson Av- enue the afternoon of March 14. Lindenhurst: Police were called March 16 af- ter someone broke a window on a 2003 Mercury parked on Bristol Street. The incident took place sometime before 6 p.m. Deer Park: A window at a West 4th Street home was broken by an unknown assailant March 11. Police were notified of the incident on March 18. •On March 19 sometime before 10 a.m. some- one smashed a window at a Conklin Street home.  ARRESTS DWI: The following persons have been arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated or im- paired: Ruben Usuachi, 41, of 55 Washington St., East Farmingdale; Shyasia Easley, 22, of 17 Hill- top La., Wheatley Heights; Andre Knowles, 54, of 1 Maple Dr., North Lindenhurst;  Petit Larceny: Richard Hilpert, 43, of 18 New St., Massapequa; Christopher Collins, 25, of 529 Wellington Rd., West Hempstead; William Roe- ill, 50, of 310 Hawkins Blvd., Copiague; Lorraine (Continued on Page 5)
  • 2. (Continued from Page 3) POLICE BLOTTER West Babylon Senior High School’s talented cast and crew drew a full house on the opening night perfor- mance of “The Wizard of Oz” on Feb. 27. Under the direction of Joseph Barone, Musical Di- rector MaryAnn Cafiero, Orchestra Conductor Dana Wizard of Oz plays to a packed auditorium Meadows and Choreogra- pher Mary Napoli, the cast and crew amused the audi- ence with this iconic tale about Dorothy (Alexa Luc- chesse) and her dog Toto, who embark on a journey to theEmeraldCitytomeetthe Wizard (Michael Grosso). On their way, they meet a Scarecrow (Matthew Light- sey), Tin Man (Thaddeus Plezia) and Cowardly Lion (Marek Ardito-Proulx). The Wizard instructs them to bring him the broom of the Wicked Witch of the West (Angeline Meller) be- fore he will help Dorothy return home, and in several instances, they meet Glinda (Paige Leddy), who helps them realize “there’s no place like home.” “The musical was challenging,” Mr. Barone said. “But the cast presented a strong and excellent delivery of the story which was extremely entertaining and one the audience will not forget.” From left, West Babylon Senior High School thespians, Matthew Lightsey (Scarecrow), Al- exa Lucchesse (Dorothy) and Marek Ardito- Proulx (Cowardly Lion) impressed the com- munity during the production of “The Wizard of Oz.” Photo provided by West Babylon School District April 2, 2015, BEACON NEWSPAPER • 5 by Liam Henry For all intents and purposes, Copiague basketball is back. Inanareawherebasketballgreatnessisknowntocome from, the only problem was that it was known for origi- nating from the school that is two miles to the southwest Amityville. Turn the page to 2014-15. The book might as well be completely rewritten. Betweentheboysandgirlsteams,theyhada34-8com- binedrecord,andbothmadeittotheirrespectiveCounty playoff semifinals. “I really liked how we came together as a team,” said QuandellButler.“Itdidn’tfeellikeabasketballteam;itfelt morelikeafamily.Weworkedhardeachandeverydayto push each other to our limits and progress as a team.” The boys squad went 16-5 on the season after going 11-3 during conference play, and earned the sixth seed in the Suffolk County Class AA playoffs. TheEaglespunchedtheirticketintotheCountysemifi- nals with wins over No. 11 Half Hollow Hills East and an upset on the road over third-seeded Central Islip to meet up with No. 2 Half Hollow Hills West at Farmingdale State College. The semifinal was a tight battle of two solid teams. Co- piague and HHH West were tied at 13 after one quarter, but the Eagles went on a run and earned a nine-point ad- vantage heading into halftime. However, from that point on, the Colts defense locked down and held Copiague to only 20 second-half points. HHH West would go on to outscore the Eagles, 36-20, in the second half to claim the 64-57 victory, and finish Copiague’s season. “It was a tough loss,” said Butler. “Both teams played hard, but unfortunately we didn’t come out on top.” On the season, Prince Hickson led the team in scor- ingwithover19pointspergame.KevinRobertsaveraged 17.4 and Elijah Rogers averaged 11.2 points to round out thedouble-digitscorers.QuandellButlerfinishedthesea- son averaging 7.3 points per game. “I felt I had a good season,” said the senior Butler. “I’m going to continue to work on my game to be successful on the next level.” Copiague boys and girls complete stellar season in semifinals As for the girls, the season was equally a success. The girls went an astounding 18-3 on the season after going a perfect 14-0 in conference action. Their success in the regular season earned them the third seed in the in the Suffolk County Class AA playoffs. The Eagles made it into the County semifinals with a winoverNo.14HalfHollowHillsEastandabigwinover sixth-seed Kings Park. The latter topped Copiague by 20 points early on in the season. The victory over Kings Park sent Copiague to the semifinals to meet up with No. 2 Commack at Longwood High School. “WelostourleadingscorerMakiayaMoore,andevery- one thought we couldn’t go far without her,” said Mikal Knight. "We just wanted to prove everyone wrong.” ThesemifinaldidnotquiteworkoutthewaytheEagles had intended. Commack jumped out to a fast 23-11 lead attheendofthefirstquarter.TheCougarswouldaddonto their lead by outscoring Copiague, 16-14, in the second quarter to grab hold of a 39-25 halftime advantage. The second half was much of the same as Commack added to their lead in the third, and then finally claimed a 70-48 victory to cap the Eagles’ season. “We didn’t play tough the whole game,” Knight said. “They also played good man defense and ran us off the three-point line.” Fortheseason,MolloyCollege-boundIhnacinseGrady ledtheteaminscoringwithan18.3pointspergameaver- age. Emilyae Ward completed her freshman season with a 12.4 average. Anna Zaborowska (8.5), Knight (7.9) and Ashley Harris (7.8) each highly contributed to the Eagles' success in the 2014-15 campaign. “I think I stepped up from last season,” said Knight. “Just becoming more of a threat then I was last season, and being consistent.” Despite transition, it still appears that Copiague boys andgirlsbasketballisstillonitsway,butthereisnoshort- age of pride in Copiague hoops. “I was very blessed to be able to be apart of Copiague basketball,” said Butler. a medical incinerator where they get destroyed.” The Sheriff’s Office has other drug prevention re- sources available to families of teens. “We have drug testing kits for parents. These are at-home kits, they don’t have to be sent out; gives you an instant read- ing in case you fear that one of your children has a drug problem,” said Hornick. The kits are also available at drugstores at a cost of approximately $30 each.  Another resource that was available at the forum was a Narcan training course. Narcan is a medica- tion used to counter the effects of opioid overdoses. It is administered through a nasal spray. The class teaches members of the community how to use the drug safely and effectively. “In 2007, the New York State Department of Health made it legal for community-based orga- nizations to do this type of training and dispense,” said Tina Wolf, executive director for Community Action for Social Justice. Deputy  Hornick  said  Narcan  can  save lives be- cause it reacts with the drug immediately. “If you’re overdosing and you’re going to die, the Narcan can stop it cold.”   The drug works for about a half hour, enough time to get the patient to a hospital. “It’s a new tool that we have,” he said. People reacted to the sensitive topics discussed at the forum. Councilman Tony Martinez of Town of Babylon said that he learned that an introduction to a substance at an early age can lead to addiction. “As a parent, that really concerns me,” he said. “I started thinking about my two boys, Tomas and Nicholas. I remember going to high school and hav- ing a health class that scared me a lot. It prevented me from trying some of those substances because I was scared to die.”   Wolf said young people do not always realize that drug use can ruin their lives and even cause their death. “You just don’t think quite in those terms when you’re young,” she said. For information on the Lindenhurst Community Cares Coalition, visit their website at  www.lindy- cares.org. For information on the Suffolk County Sheriff’s  Shed  the Meds initiative, visit www.suf- folkcountyny.gov/sheriff/CommunityPrograms/ ShedTheMeds. For information on Community Action for Social Justice, visit www.nysocialjustice. org. Lindenhurst tackles drug problem (Continued from Page 3) LaGasse, 34, of 309 Sherbrolke Rd., Lindenhurst; Nicole Norelius, 23, of 320 48th St., Lindenhurst; Ardella Mae Page, 55, of 27 Andress Plaza, North Amityville; Jose Moradelos-Santos, 25, homeless.   The charges against those arrested are allegations, and the cases are still pending in the courts. Indi- viduals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.