Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Segmentación audiencia

473 views

Published on

This is a translation in Spanish of my English power point "Audience Segmentation" by Juana Torino, the Project Director of Re-imagining The Museum" and other workshops for Fundacion TyPA. It is available to anyone who uses the Spanish language when thinking about museum audiences and ways to make exhibitions more useful to multiple audiences.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Segmentación audiencia

  1. 1. E L A I N E H E U M A N N G U R I A N S E P T 2 0 1 3 SEGMENTACIÓN DE PÚBLICOS
  2. 2. INTRODUCCION  Esto fue escrito para ayudar a profesionales de museos a segmentar a sus públicos  Tomar en consideración las necesidades de cada segmento  Y luego crear ofertas específicas que sirvan mejor a cada grupo y los hagan sentir particularmente bienvenidos
  3. 3. Segmentación de audiencias Wikipedia 1 (inglés)  Audience segmentation is a process of dividing people into more similar subgroups based upon defined criterion such as product usage, demographics, psychographics, communication behaviors and media use.[1][2]  Audience segmentation is used in commercial marketing so advertisers can design and tailor products and services that satisfy the targeted groups.  In social marketing, audiences are segmented into subgroups and assumed to have similar interests, needs and behavioral patterns and this assumption allows social marketers to design relevant health or social messages that influence the people to adopt recommended behaviors.[3]  Audience segmentation makes campaign efforts more effective when messages are tailored to the distinct subgroups and more efficient when the target audience is selected based on their susceptibility and receptivity.[5][6] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audience_segmentation
  4. 4. Segmentación de audiencias Wikipedia 2 (inglés)  Audience segmentation strategy is driven by the goal of developing criteria that can be used to form homogeneous clusters.  The most common criteria used are demographics (age, level of education, income, ethnicity and gender) and geography (region, county, census tract).  Since an audience segment that is derived exclusively from demographics such as Asian-American youths constitutes a large group that still has varied beliefs, values and behavior, demographics may not be sufficient as segmentation criteria.[7]  More sophisticated segmentation strategies use psychosocial, behavioral and psychographics (personality, values, attitudes, interests, level of readiness for change and lifestyles) as variables to categorize audience subgroups.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audience_segmentation
  5. 5. Ética  Hay todo tipo de preguntas éticas que surgen al utilizar la segmentación de públicos porque tiende a segmentar y estereotipar a la gente.  Tiende a ser manipulativo con el fin de generar algún cambio o ventaja.  Hoy, no estamos segmentando con ese fin, sino con el objetivo de saber que los servicios que estamos ofreciendo en nuestras instituciones cumplen con las necesidades e intereses de los grupos. Pero estas consideraciones éticas deben ser tenidas en cuenta.
  6. 6. Por qué hacerlo?  PROGRAMAS A MEDIDA  EXHIBICIONES CON CAPAS (LAYERS)  DETERMINAR EL PLANEAMIENTO DEL ESPACIO  DETERMINAR LA TEORÍA DEL APRENDIZAJE MÁS ADECUADA  PENSAR SOBRE LOS HORARIOS Y PRECIOS MÁS APROPIADOS  DECIDIR LA ESTRATEGIA DE MARKETING  PENSAR EN QUIÉN NO ESTA VINIENDO Y POR QUÉ NO.  CREAR ESTRATEGIAS DE FINANCIACIÓN ADECUADAS  Y TENER UN PRESUPUESTO Y STAFF QUE COINCIDA CON NUESTROS OBJETIVOS Y EXPECTATIVAS.
  7. 7.  Demographics, i.e. age, gender, education, class/occupation.  Family status -- heavily used in heritage segmentation, because it can be a major predictor of behaviour (dependant; pre-family; family at different stages; older marrieds and empty nesters).  In the past, ethnic origin has been a rare factor in visitor surveys, but this is changing as museums seek to respond to the needs of local communities and broaden their audience base.  Geography, i.e. resident/local, day tripper, national/international tourist.  Socio-economics —the JICNAR (National Press Joint Industry Committee on National Audiences and Readership) classification is still the most commonly used by heritage sites and museums in the UK because it enables comparisons to be made with previous surveys. The groups are classified as:  A higher managerial, administrative or professional  B middle managerial, administrative or professional  C1 supervisory, clerical or managerial  C2 skilled manual workers  D semi- and unskilled manual workers  E pensioners, the unemployed, casual or lowest grade workers.  Edited from Black, Graham, The Engaging Museum: Developing Museums for Visitor Involvement, Psychology Press, 2005 TEORÍA CLÁSICA DE SEGMENTACIÓN– REINO UNIDO (inglés) Ninguna introducción a los estudios de públicos puede comenzar sin entender antes los elementos básicos de la segmentación de públicos. Las teorías clásicas de la segmentación en el marketing dividen las audiencias en términos de:
  8. 8. SEGMENTATION II  Structured educational use, i.e. primary/elementary (to age around 11/12), secondary/ high (aged around 11 to 16/18), student (college/university)  Special interest, i.e. subject specialist, self-directed learning, booked group, for example, a local history group. This can also be referred to as a part of behaviouristic segmentation, linking groups of people according to interest in or relationship with particular subjects/products.  Psychographic segmentation which relates to lifestyles, opinions, attitudes, etc. This is still infrequently used, although it is becoming more common to hear references to these terms as museums increasingly take leisure trends into account.  And others: from elsewhere  Levels of Engagement  Levels of Understanding, Experience, Knowledge  Motivation for Attending
  9. 9. MUSEUM BLOGSPOT Jeanne Virgeront (inglés)  Describing the Audience  Planning for specific groups is more effective than planning for one large undifferentiated audience. There are many ways to describe an audience. I have written before about viewing the audience as customers, learners, and citizens and there are many others. Engaging the audience in the museum’s programmatic offerings means considering specific attributes and qualities that are salient to involvement with exhibits, programs, and events. Four attributes I find relevant are age, interests, availability, and grouping. They admittedly interact with one another but are also worth considering separately.  • Age of children is relevant because age-related development drives other important considerations: how children of different ages explore, play with, and learn from objects, activities, and spaces; how they interact with family and peers; and related roles for adults.  • Interests may be personal like dinosaurs, sports, engineering, music, nature, or art. Interests may also be related to development such as a preschooler being interested in what her parents is doing and a tween being interested in peers. For adults interests may be related to careers and hobbies.  • Availability depends on other options or commitments on someone’s time. This includes school and jobs for most people from 5 to 65 years; school vacations; more open schedules for retirees.  • Grouping relates to whether children and adults are likely to visit in groups (school, family, or community organizations), or as individuals   http://museumnotes.blogspot.com/2011/05/engaging-audiences-strategically.html
  10. 10. DEMOGRAFÍAS  EDAD  UBICACIÓN DEL HOGAR / DOMICILIO  NIVEL EDUCATIVO  FAMILIA  INGRESOS  HABITO DE IR A MUSEOS  PROFESIÓN  RELIGIÓN  CULTURA Y ETNICIDAD
  11. 11. Grupos Organizados Por ejemplo:  Aulas, Grados y Cursos  Tours, Equipos y Clubes  Campamentos y programas de verano  Jubilados y retirados
  12. 12. Grupos sociales: visitante que se acerca por propia voluntad Tales como:  Familias  Parejas  Equipos / Amigos  Individuos o  Adolescente – amigos, bandas, individuales  Jovenes adultos – parejas  Familias  Ancianos, retirados
  13. 13. Por edad / Nivel de grado  Jardín de infantes  Primaria  Secundaria  Universidad  Jóven-adulto  Mediana edad  “Seniors”
  14. 14. Niveles de compromiso (engagement) Algunos ejemplos:  Experto / Aprendiz  “Skimmers, dippers, divers”  Cantidad de veces que visita el museo.  Investigación del Dallas Museum of Art basada en el conocimiento sobre el arte previo de los visitantes y el grado de participación en experiencias artísticas  Awareness,  Curious,  Commitment  The four visitor clusters—Tentative Observers, Curious Participants, Discerning Independents, and Committed Enthusiasts—exist within the three Levels of Engagement, with two clusters in the Commitment Level. http://dallasmuseumofart.org/AboutUs/Frameworkforengagingwithart/index.ht m
  15. 15. MOTIVACIONES / EXPECTATIVAS  Socialización / “congregant behavior”  Reverencial/ espiritual.  Entretenimiento, ocio, diversión.  Búsqueda personal.  Tarea, cumplir con un ejercicio.  Experiencia de una vez – Exhibición única, “blockbuster”.  Bueno para la familia, niños.  Escape de los deberes.  Recreación, ocio.  Soren, Barbara J. Meeting the Needs of Museum Visitors, in Lord, Gail Dexter and Lord, Barry, The Manual of Museum Planning, Alta Mira, 1999, p.58.
  16. 16. TIPOS DE PERSONALIDADES  Introvertido/ Extrovertido  Meyers Briggs
  17. 17. Por experiencia Van a museos: educación, clase media y alta, profesionales, aspiraciones para nuestros niños, saber cómo comportarse, tiene “social cache”, ama el material y traspasará toda barrera para verlo. No van a museos: padres no iban, inmigrantes, clase trabajadora, baja educación, no pueden pagarlo, creen que serán burlados, nunca fueron antes.
  18. 18. Por ambiente - hogar / Distancia  DÓNDE VIVIS  Ambiente Urbano/Rural  Ciudad pequeña / grande  Departamento / casa  Alquiler / Propietario  Barrio seguro / peligroso O DE DÓNDE VENÍS:  Local  Regional (1 o 1 ½ hora de distancia)  “Domestic” (en otra provincia)  Fuera del país http://www.slideshare.net/tirralirra/32-audience-segmentation
  19. 19. AL FINAL, SE TRATA DE UNA FILOSOFÍA  Ser receptivo a todos los grupos requiere:  Staff entrenado en ser acogedor y dar la bienvenida,  Poner la atención en invitar a los líderes comunitarios  Tener programas que apoyen sus fortalezas individuales  Crear programas que respondan a necesidades e intereses  Pasar tiempo real en la comunidad para construir confianza  Buscar la “etiqueta” esperada o Looking at the implied ettiquette expected by and embebida en la institución  Maneras simples de sobrepasar barreras económicas  Diversificar nuestro staff
  20. 20. EJEMPLOS DE PROGRAMAS DISEÑADOS PARA AUDIENCIAS  Adolescentes como parte del staff – muchos programas  El significado de la membresía – especial para mí.  Grupos escolares  Festejos de cumpleaños  Cursos y campamentos
  21. 21. CONSIGNA 1  Utilizando 10 postales creá una exhibición:  Cuál es su título, tema y audiencia a la que apunta?  Cambiá la audiencia apuntada (definí una nueva) y modificá la exhibición para apelar a esa nueva audiencia. Señalá 3 modificaciones.  Diseñá dos técnicas de layering que apunten a los intereses de dos audiencias secundarias.
  22. 22. CONSIGNA 2  Elegí uno de los segmentos de audiencia que fueron mencionados en el Power Point o inventá tu propio segmento.  Producí una hoja de trabajo (worksheet) para tu museo (o alguno que elijas) enumerando las categorías en un lado del cuadro  Completá el cuadro describiendo: :  Características de cada uno de los grupos  Tipo de exhibición que los atraería especialmente  Tipo de programa que los atraería especialmente  Maneras de atraerlos a través del marketing  Amenities/comodidades que necesitan para tener una visita agradable y cómoda.
  23. 23. BIBLIOGRAFIA  Reach advisors: http://reachadvisors.typepad.com/museum_audien ce_insight/research-results/  Museum 2.0 Nina Simon: http://museumtwo.blogspot.com/2013/09/museum -20-rerun-what-does-it-really.html  The Smithsonian http://museumstudies.si.edu/sufi/index.html  http://www.slideshare.net/tirralirra/32-audience- segmentation

×