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AUDIENCE SEGMENTATION
AN OVERVIEW
Elaine Heumann Gurian
Sept 2013
INTRODUCTION
• This was written to help museum staff
sort their users into segments
• consider the needs of each subset
• ...
ATTENTION GETTING QUOTES
• “For children’s museums this often means that
the audience has been younger than thought.
For m...
Wikipedia on Audience Segmentation
• Audience segmentation is a process of dividing people into more similar
subgroups bas...
Criteria from Wikipedia
• Audience segmentation strategy is driven by the goal of
developing criteria that can be used to ...
Ethics
• There are all kinds of ethical questions for
using audience segmentation for societal
change behaviour.
• We are ...
Why bother?
• TAILOR PROGRAMS
• LAYER EXHIBITIONS
• DETERMINE SPACE PLANNING
• DETERMINE APPROPRIATE LEARNING THEORY
• THI...
No introduction to visitor studies can begin without a basic understanding of market segmentation.… Classic
market segment...
Organized Groups
For example:
• Classrooms
• Tours and Clubs
• Camps and summer programs
Social groups: (volitional users)
Such as:
• Families
• Couples
• Cohorts / Friends
• Individuals
Levels of Engagement:
Examples could include:
• Expert / Novice
• Skimmers, dippers, divers
• Number of times visiting thi...
MOTIVATIONS / EXPECTATIONS
• Socializing / congregant behavior.
• Reverential/ spiritual.
• Entertainment, leisure, enjoym...
By intention and motivation
By Age
By experience
By cultural heritage
By class
By Home Environment
• Urban/Rural
• Small / Large city
• Apartment / home
• Rental / Owned
• Safe / Dangerous Neighborhood
WORKSHEET 1
• Using any 10 postcards create an exhibition:
• What is the title, theme and target audience?
• Change the ta...
Worksheet 2
• Pick one of the segmented audiences that were
illustrated in the Power Point.
• Produce a worksheet for your...
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Museum Audience segmentation 2013

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A short Review about a way to think of different audiences. For use during an audience segmentation workshop for museum studies, exhibition making, etc.

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Museum Audience segmentation 2013

  1. 1. AUDIENCE SEGMENTATION AN OVERVIEW Elaine Heumann Gurian Sept 2013
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION • This was written to help museum staff sort their users into segments • consider the needs of each subset • and the best way to customize their offerings in order to better serve each group.
  3. 3. ATTENTION GETTING QUOTES • “For children’s museums this often means that the audience has been younger than thought. For many art museums, the audience has often been older than thought.” Jeanne Vergerant, Museum Notes Blog
  4. 4. Wikipedia on Audience Segmentation • Audience segmentation is a process of dividing people into more similar subgroups based upon defined criterion such as product usage, demographics, psychographics, communication behaviors and media use.[1][2] • Audience segmentation is used in commercial marketing so advertisers can design and tailor products and services that satisfy the targeted groups. • In social marketing, audiences are segmented into subgroups and assumed to have similar interests, needs and behavioral patterns and this assumption allows social marketers to design relevant health or social messages that influence the people to adopt recommended behaviors.[3] • Audience segmentation makes campaign efforts more effective when messages are tailored to the distinct subgroups and more efficient when the target audience is selected based on their susceptibility and receptivity.[5][6] • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audience_segmentation
  5. 5. Criteria from Wikipedia • Audience segmentation strategy is driven by the goal of developing criteria that can be used to form homogeneous clusters. The most common criteria used are demographics (age, level of education, income, ethnicity and gender) and geography (region, county, census tract). Since an audience segment that is derived exclusively from demographics such as Asian-American youths constitutes a large group that still has varied beliefs, values and behavior, demographics may not be sufficient as segmentation criteria.[7] More sophisticated segmentation strategies use psychosocial, behavioral and psychographics (personality, values, attitudes, interests, level of readiness for change and lifestyles) as variables to categorize audience subgroups.[8] • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audience_segmentation
  6. 6. Ethics • There are all kinds of ethical questions for using audience segmentation for societal change behaviour. • We are not using these for that perpose today but rather to make sure we are delivering services to different groups so that they can find user satisfaction in our institutions.
  7. 7. Why bother? • TAILOR PROGRAMS • LAYER EXHIBITIONS • DETERMINE SPACE PLANNING • DETERMINE APPROPRIATE LEARNING THEORY • THINK ABOUT APPROPRIATE HOURS, PRICES • DECIDE ON MARKETING STRATEGY • DEMOGRAPHICS --THINK ABOUT WHO IS NOT COMING • APPROPRIATE FUNDRAISING STRATEGIES • ETC.
  8. 8. No introduction to visitor studies can begin without a basic understanding of market segmentation.… Classic market segmentation breaks down ‘traditional’ heritage audiences in terms of: • Demographics, i.e. age, gender, education, class/occupation. • Family status is heavily used in heritage segmentation, as it can be such a major predictor of behaviour (dependant; pre-family; family at different stages; older marrieds and empty nesters). • In the past, ethnic origin has been a rare factor in visitor surveys, but this is changing as museums seek to respond to the needs of local communities and broaden their audience base. • Geography, i.e. resident/local, day tripper, national/international tourist. • Socio-economics —the JICNAR (National Press Joint Industry Committee on National Audiences and Readership) classification is still the most commonly used by heritage sites and museums in the UK because it enables comparisons to be made with previous surveys. The groups are classified as: – A higher managerial, administrative or professional – B middle managerial, administrative or professional – C1 supervisory, clerical or managerial – C2 skilled manual workers – D semi- and unskilled manual workers – E pensioners, the unemployed, casual or lowest grade workers. • Structured educational use, i.e. primary/elementary (to age around 11/12), secondary/ high (aged around 11 to 16/18), student (college/university) • Special interest, i.e. subject specialist, self-directed learning, booked group, for example, a local history group. This can also be referred to as a part of behaviouristic segmentation, linking groups of people according to interest in or relationship with particular subjects/products. • Psychographic segmentation which relates to lifestyles, opinions, attitudes, etc. This is still infrequently used, although it is becoming more common to hear references to these terms as museums increasingly take leisure trends into account. Edited from Black, Graham, The Engaging Museum: Developing Museums for Visitor Involvement, Psychology Press, 2005
  9. 9. Organized Groups For example: • Classrooms • Tours and Clubs • Camps and summer programs
  10. 10. Social groups: (volitional users) Such as: • Families • Couples • Cohorts / Friends • Individuals
  11. 11. Levels of Engagement: Examples could include: • Expert / Novice • Skimmers, dippers, divers • Number of times visiting this museum. • Dallas Museum of Art research study based on visitors’ prior art knowledge and degree of participation in art experiences – Awareness, – Curious, – Commitment – The four visitor clusters—Tentative Observers, Curious Participants, Discerning Independents, and Committed Enthusiasts—exist within the three Levels of Engagement, with two clusters in the Commitment Level. – http://dallasmuseumofart.org/AboutUs/Frameworkforengagingwithar t/index.htm
  12. 12. MOTIVATIONS / EXPECTATIONS • Socializing / congregant behavior. • Reverential/ spiritual. • Entertainment, leisure, enjoyment. • On a personal quest. • Homework, fulfill an assignment. • Unique exhibition, blockbuster. • Good for the family, children. • Escape from chores. • Soren, Barbara J. Meeting the Needs of Museum Visitors, in Lord, Gail Dexter and Lord, Barry, The Manual of Museum Planning, Alta Mira, 1999, p.58.
  13. 13. By intention and motivation
  14. 14. By Age
  15. 15. By experience
  16. 16. By cultural heritage
  17. 17. By class
  18. 18. By Home Environment • Urban/Rural • Small / Large city • Apartment / home • Rental / Owned • Safe / Dangerous Neighborhood
  19. 19. WORKSHEET 1 • Using any 10 postcards create an exhibition: • What is the title, theme and target audience? • Change the target audience (who is that) and modify the exhibition to fit the new target audience. List 3 modificatons. • Illustrate two layering techniques to accommodate the needs of two secondary audiences.
  20. 20. Worksheet 2 • Pick one of the segmented audiences that were illustrated in the Power Point. • Produce a worksheet for your museums (or one you choose) listing the categories down one side of a chart • And fill out the chart describing the following: – Characteristics of each of the groups – Type of exhibition that will have special appeal – Type of program that will have special appeal – Way to reach them through marketing – Amenities they need to make their visit comfortable.

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