Why Dropbox is not a Document Management System

1,090 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,090
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Jackson Hewitt, HR block, Colby College, superior senior care, genworth
  • Why Dropbox is not a Document Management System

    1. 1. 1 Paul Conterio, Customer Relations Why DropBox is not Document Management – The 5 Functions You Should Look For in a Document Management Solution
    2. 2. 2 Some Clients and PartnersSome Customers and Partners
    3. 3. 3 Agenda Todays webinar covers  Growth of document management software  Dropbox  5 critical functions for DMS  Q&A
    4. 4. 4 Growth of DMS Low Costs of Electronic Storage. Price per GB of Hard Drive Storage: 1981 — $300,000 1987 — $50,000 1990 — $10,000 1994 — $1000 1997 — $100 2000 — $10 2004 — $1 2010 — $0.10
    5. 5. 5 Growth of DMS Low Costs of Electronic Storage. Price per GB of Hard Drive Storage: 1981 — $300,000 1987 — $50,000 1990 — $10,000 1994 — $1000 1997 — $100 2000 — $10 2004 — $1 2010 — $0.10
    6. 6. 6 Growth of DMS Low Costs of Electronic Storage. Government Encouragement Need for Privacy, Backup, and Security High Speed Scanners
    7. 7. 7 Dropbox Great consumer-centric cloud solution  Free for the first 2 gigs of online storage  $10/Mo. for 50 gigs ($40/yr for version history)  $20/Mo. for 100 gigs ($40/yr for version history)  Team pricing for businesses  $795/yr for 5 users (1000 GB total)  $125/yr for additional user (200 GB each user)  Phone support and Version History included  Features  All documents, photos, videos to be store online and accessed from any internet connected tool  Simple sharing of files with friends, families  Back ups so files are safe from hardware failure  Access anywhere – geographically flexible
    8. 8. 8 Wikipedia Overview of DMS “A document management system (DMS) is a computer system (or set of computer programs) used to track and store electronic documents and/or images of paper documents. It is usually also capable of keeping track of the different versions created by different users (history tracking). The term has some overlap with the concepts of content management systems. It is often viewed as a component of enterprise content management (ECM) systems and related to digital asset management, document imaging, workflow systems and records management systems.”
    9. 9. 9 5 Critical Components of DMS  Integration with office business applications  Efficient capture of paper documents  Smart indexing (OCR for PDFs)  Security - access and transit documents to comply with regulatory requirements (HIPAA, FINRA, SEC)  Document retention – automate record management  Include both Cloud and Server options for businesses
    10. 10. 10 Business Benefits of DMS Managing information to:  Reduce RISK  From compliance and regulatory requirements  From, and for, customer records  For communication between locations, mobile phones and tablets, etc.  Decrease Expenses  Decrease labor required to manage files and information  Increase Profitability  Faster, accurate access to information increases revenue, reduces costs and increases quality perception.
    11. 11. 11 Critical Components DropBox DMS Integration with Business Applications Paper Capture Smart Indexing Security Document Retention Summary
    12. 12. 12 Key Findings After 10 years of experience, the following trends are very noticeable  Online backup options are drawing consumers into using the cloud for file storage – then, as employees, are then introducing businesses to new online solutions  Businesses are already scanning files in and storing them in their Windows file systems  Businesses that are paper-intensive and compliance-bound are finding needs are not being met with simple online storage  Big issues emerging – security, duplicate effort, integration, customization, retention
    13. 13. 13 Q&A

    ×