Extreme Makeover: PowerPoint Edition<br />Jennifer Duperon<br />Boston University School of Law<br />Elizabeth Farrell<br ...
How Are You Using PowerPoint? <br />or<br />
“the inclusion of visually presented text concurrently with the same text in an auditory form . . . inhibited learning. An...
Citation in the Federal Register Looks Like This: <br />68 Fed. Reg. 58367 <br />
Bill Law<br />
Adding Photos<br />
Sound, Appearance, Meaning<br />
Finding Cases<br />
Think Design Not Decoration<br />
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34271735/<br />Credits<br />Slide 3: http://www.istockphoto.com<br />Slide 6: http://www.flickr....
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Extreme Makeover: PowerPoint Edition

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Slides from the 2010 Annual Meeting session &quot;Extreme Makeover: PowerPoint Edition&quot; by Jennifer Duperon (Boston University) and Elizabeth Farrell (Florida State University)

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  • We all agree that our students, patrons, users all deserve the best from us. Is this really the best we can offer them?
  • PP is a tool to facilitate your students’ learning, designed to be multimedia presenter, it’s a crutch if its only using as a teleprompter, storing notes. Iif its just there your job teaching easier, that’s not helping your audience learn.
  • in study pubilshed in 2000, researchers found “the inclusion of visually presented text concurrently with the same text in an auditory form . . . inhibited learning. An additional cognitive load was imposed on learners who processed identical visual and auditory material.”Read quote, ask question.
  • This is a typical slide. Your audience will be reading the text while you are saying the same thing, so not only is it bad for learning, but how is your presence adding value to the instruction? Your class didn’t come to see you, they came to see what you can do for them.
  • How do we fix this problem? To start, we need to ask ourselves a very important question: Does this presentation even need a powerpoint? Would this presentation be better by using different methods or materials. Some subjects or audiences might be better off with a handout, a webpage, a video, a lecture, a live demonstration, a discussion, hands on exercises, or some combination of the above. So the first rule of PowerPoint is never use a powerpoint when some other method or material would work better in its place.
  • If the presentation would be better with a powerpoint, she will apply 3 principles of construction.
  • Use fewer words. If your audience can get the whole presentation by reading your slides, why are you even there? And, your audience may learn less if they have to listen and read your words at the same time. Finally, reading all of the words you want to say is boring and redundant. Don’t use lots of words just because it is convenient to you. Instead, use the Notes field of PowerPoint software to plan what you are going to say. PP is not your teleprompter.
  • Following this principle, this slidebecame:
  • This. Additional points could be written in the notes field of the powerpoint to be referred to during the presentation. With a simple slide like this, the presenter can fill in all of the points.
  • Another example, where less is more, we’ll take this, and make it over into this:
  • Reiterate that with less text, they are listening to me explain and not reading. Discuss putting extra prompts/notes/material in notes field.
  • Create visual interest! Powerpoint was designed as a multimedia presentation—not as a mere digital blackboard. Use it for its strength by displaying photos, grahpics, charts, screenshots, or other images.
  • Following this principle, this slidebecame:
  • So we still have this… and just thinking about using design to create visual interest and aid in comprehension, we can do this:
  • Your audience will see this, take the visual cues that this is a process and then listen to what you have to say. Supplying visual interest does not have to take a lot of time - This arrow graphic took 90sec to make w/ MS SmartArt
  • Another way to create visual interest is to add photosFound w/ Flickr (creative commons) and clipart and stockphotos if you have $
  • Be creative, experiment with large images that evoke an idea or help create associations in your audiences’ minds. This slide was created for a presentation about Trademark Infringement. This was created to help illustrate that a trademark may be infringing if it is similar in sound, appearance, or meaning to another trademark.
  • Setting the stage for talking about sup ct cases
  • ScreenshotsQuickly illustrating, don’t want to go liveNo/questionable internet access Caveat – if you are demo’ing a website/database, go with a live demo over screenshots.
  • In sum, when talking about adding visual interest - Design adds to the presentation by directing attention, creating interest, spurring thoughts and questions, and it looks attractive. Decoration does none of those – one man’s decoration is another’s clutter (and therefore distraction). In particular, most default powerpoint templates are full of distracting shapes, colors and textures that don’t add anything to your presentation. Next time you’re thinking of using a template, just try putting black text on a white background, and you’ll immediately make your presentation cleaner and less distracting.
  • Create a take away document that is different than your slides. If your slides can stand alone as a document to refer to after class or after a presentation, why should anyone attend the class or presentation? Your take away document can be a handout or website that includes major points, resources, and more. Great way to add value.
  • PPT should not be the the takeaway document: takes pages and pages to cover the material, not very helpful for later reference. Instead of handing out slides, create takeaway documents that provide your audience with the important information in a format that works for them.
  • Handouts,webpages, or worksheets that gave her class the information she wanted them to take with them—whether or not it was covered in the powerpoint. explain each document
  • Following these 3 principles your presentations will be more engaging and better designed for learning. You are more important than the powerpoint
  • Extreme Makeover: PowerPoint Edition

    1. 1. Extreme Makeover: PowerPoint Edition<br />Jennifer Duperon<br />Boston University School of Law<br />Elizabeth Farrell<br />Florida State University College of Law<br />Handout available at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/34271735/<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. How Are You Using PowerPoint? <br />or<br />
    4. 4. “the inclusion of visually presented text concurrently with the same text in an auditory form . . . inhibited learning. An additional cognitive load was imposed on learners who processed identical visual and auditory material.”More important, are you listening to me or reading this ugly slide? <br />
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    6. 6.
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    8. 8.
    9. 9.
    10. 10.
    11. 11.
    12. 12. Citation in the Federal Register Looks Like This: <br />68 Fed. Reg. 58367 <br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14.
    15. 15.
    16. 16. Bill Law<br />
    17. 17. Adding Photos<br />
    18. 18. Sound, Appearance, Meaning<br />
    19. 19. Finding Cases<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. Think Design Not Decoration<br />
    22. 22.
    23. 23.
    24. 24.
    25. 25.
    26. 26.
    27. 27. http://www.scribd.com/doc/34271735/<br />Credits<br />Slide 3: http://www.istockphoto.com<br />Slide 6: http://www.flickr.com/photos/striatic/2144933705/<br />Slide 17: http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/2478955124/<br />Slide 18: Microsoft clip art<br />Slide 19: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/37621686/<br />Slide 26: http://www.flickr.com/photos/travelinlibrarian/223839049/<br />Slide 4 quote from: SlavaKalyuga, Paul Chandler & John Sweller, Incorporating learner experience into the design of multimedia instruction., 92 Journal of Educational Psychology 126-136 (2000)<br />

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