Text and Image based Digital Humanities: providing access to textual heritage in Flanders - Guest Lecture Würzburg, 13 December 2012

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Text and Image based Digital Humanities: providing access to textual heritage in Flanders - Guest Lecture Würzburg, 13 December 2012

  1. 1. Text and Image based Digital Humanities:providing access to textual heritage in FlandersEdward VanhoutteDirector of Research & Publications, Royal Academy of Dutch Language & LiteratureResearch Associate, UCL Centre for Digital HumanitiesEditor-in-Chief, LLC: The Journal of Digital Scholarship in the Humanities (OUP)edward.vanhoutte@kantl.be@evanhoutte Guest Lecture – Würzburg – 13/12/2012
  2. 2. Overview●Humanities Computing●Digital Humanities●Projects●Discussion Guest Lecture – Würzburg – 13/12/2012
  3. 3. Auguste Rodin (1940-1917)
  4. 4. GatesOfHellRodinMuseumParis
  5. 5. Humanities Computing
  6. 6. Failure
  7. 7. ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer) ●Construction started 1943 ●Ballistic research during WWII ●Operational in 1946
  8. 8. EDVAC (Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer) ●First binary stored program computer ●Ballistic research during WWII ●Operational in 1951
  9. 9. Problem:Computers were operationalButWar was over
  10. 10. Ada Lovelace (1815-1852)Again, it [the operating mechanism, EV] might act upon other thingsbesides number, were objects found whose mutual fundamentalrelations could be expressed by those of the abstract science ofoperations, and which should be also susceptible of adaptations to theaction of the operating notation and mechanism of the engine.Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitchedsounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition weresusceptible of such expression and adaptations, the engine mightcompose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree ofcomplexity or extent. (Lovelace, 1961 [1843], p. 248-249)
  11. 11. Warren Weaver (1894-1978) Science: Humanities: Mathematics Machine Translation
  12. 12. Machine TranslationWarren Weaver:●Cryptanalysis●Cold War Andrew Donald Booth (1918-2009) ●Linguistic problems ●Concordances ●Frequency lists ●Lemmatization → Disputed authorship → Stylometry
  13. 13. Electronic Text Analysis Roberto Busa (1913-2011) 1950: plans for the Index ThomisticusEncoding categories of vocabulary during input→ automatic linguistic analysis
  14. 14. Machine Translation Computational Linguistics (1966)Electronic Text Analysis Humanities Computing
  15. 15. GatesOfHellRodinMuseumMeudon
  16. 16. 2004
  17. 17. Digital Humanities?Digital Humanist?What is it?What is its purpose? → Definition?
  18. 18. The application of computational methods to research and teaching in the humanities.—John UnsworthThe use of digital media and tools to answer traditional humanities questions, and thestudy of new questions that are formed by the intersection of modernmethods/tools/models and humanitistic sources.—Laurie AllenResearchers working with digital materials, tools, or methods in the humanities;researchers creating new digital materials, tools, or methods in the humanities;researchers studying computing using humanities methods.—Stan RueckerA very rewarding activity which still scares people who dont understand that computerscan generate meaning—evanhout
  19. 19. Instead of a definition, we have a genealogy, a network offamily resemblances among provisional schools of thought,methodological interests, and preferred tools, a history ofpeople who have chosen to call themselves digital humanistsand who in the process of trying to define the term are creatingthat definition.—Rafael Alvarado<http://transducer.ontoligent.com/?p=717> → Social Category
  20. 20. Instead of a definition, we have a genealogy, a network of family resemblancesamong provisional schools of thought, methodological interests, and preferred tools,a history of people who have chosen to call themselves digital humanists and whoin the process of trying to define the term are creating that definition.—Rafael Alvarado<http://transducer.ontoligent.com/?p=717> → Social CategoryA tactical convenience—Matt Kirschenbaum
  21. 21. At a moment when the academy in general and the humanitiesin particular are the object of massive and wrenching changes,digital humanities emerges as a rare vector for jujitsu,simultaneously serving to position the humanities at the veryforefront of certain valueladen agendas—entrepreneurship,openness and public engagement, futureoriented thinking,collaboration, interdisciplinarity, big data, industry tieins, anddistance or distributed education—while at the same timeallowing for various forms of intrainstitutional mobility as newcourses are mooted, new colleagues are hired, new resources areallotted, and old resources are reallocated.Matthew Kirschenbaum
  22. 22. Subscriptions: +25%Submissions: +300%
  23. 23. Digital Humanities● Of the humanities● Innovative● Asks the same questions in a different way● Interdisciplinary● Multilingual● Interactive● Self critical● Community building● FunThe future of the humanities
  24. 24. Digital HumanitiesTries to model the surrounding world in order toreach at a better understading of humans, theiractivities and what they produce.
  25. 25. Text and Image based Digital Humanities:providing access to textual heritage in FlandersEdward VanhoutteDirector of Research & Publications, Royal Academy of Dutch Language & LiteratureResearch Associate, UCL Centre for Digital HumanitiesEditor-in-Chief, LLC: The Journal of Digital Scholarship in the Humanities (OUP)edward.vanhoutte@kantl.be@evanhoutte Guest Lecture – Würzburg – 13/12/2012

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