Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Midterm Student Feedback
Reflecting on Lessons Learned
and Best Practices
Doug Holton, Hajara Mahmood, Kathryn Cunningham
...
Goals for This Session
1. Helping attendees learn how to effectively and
efficiently offer a Midterm Student Feedback (MSF...
History of Midterm Student Feedback (MSF)
1970s - SGID - Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (1977, 1982) developed
by Bio...
Varieties of MSF
MSF - Midterm Student Feedback
SGID - Small Group Instructional Diagnosis
MID - Midterm Instructional Dia...
MSF: A Win-Win-Win for Faculty, Students, and Us
Instructors:
Valuable feedback from students and a
teaching expert/consul...
Example MSF Process
Description of one way that we do MSF for those unfamiliar with MSF or SGID:
1. Send email to instruct...
Designing and Reflecting on an MSF Service
Starting with 4 critical decisions that we’ll discuss:
1.What questions will yo...
1.Designing Your MSF Questions/Survey
What questions will you use on your MSF survey or for
discussion?
Which questions? W...
2. Conducting an MSF Session
How will you introduce and conduct the MSF with
students?
How will you start and introduce th...
3. Analyzing & Reporting MSF to Instructors
How will you analyze and report the student feedback
to instructors?
How will ...
4. Scaling Up MSF
How can you scale up your MSF service to more
instructors?
How many MSFs can you do now? How long does e...
Additional Questions
5. How will you advertise and explain your MSF service
to instructors?
6. How will you assess and imp...
Thank you!
MSF Guidebook:
http://bit.ly/msfguidebook
Doug Holton, Hajara Mahmood, Kathryn Cunningham
Center for Teaching &...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Midterm Student Feedback: Reflecting on Lessons Learned and Best Practices

469 views

Published on

Midterm Student Feedback (MSF) is a win-win for faculty, students, and faculty developers. Instructors get valuable feedback on their teaching, students feel empowered, and faculty developers get a window into teaching practices on their campus, as well as consulting opportunities with faculty. MSF has been collected for decades in a variety of ways (SGID, TAP, QCD…). During this session, participants will discuss key aspects of the MSF process, including effective ways to advertise MSF services, conduct MSF surveys, and report MSF data to faculty. Also, what are pitfalls to avoid, and how can online tools make the process more efficient?

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Midterm Student Feedback: Reflecting on Lessons Learned and Best Practices

  1. 1. Midterm Student Feedback Reflecting on Lessons Learned and Best Practices Doug Holton, Hajara Mahmood, Kathryn Cunningham Center for Teaching & Learning Excellence - Embry-Riddle, Daytona Beach http://dbctle.erau.edu/
  2. 2. Goals for This Session 1. Helping attendees learn how to effectively and efficiently offer a Midterm Student Feedback (MSF) service or reflect on and improve their existing service 2. Discussing critical decisions involved in designing an MSF service 3. Getting feedback from attendees and POD members on an MSF guidebook and questionnaire 2
  3. 3. History of Midterm Student Feedback (MSF) 1970s - SGID - Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (1977, 1982) developed by Biology faculty at U. Washington with a FIPSE grant. “The seed has now been planted and only time will tell how large the SGID tree will grow” (Clark & Redmond, 1982). There are now sessions about SGID and related techniques at the POD Conference about every year. 3 sessions this year. Chapters on SGID in Handbooks of Faculty Development until recently. We will use “MSF” to refer to all midterm feedback techniques, generally. 3
  4. 4. Varieties of MSF MSF - Midterm Student Feedback SGID - Small Group Instructional Diagnosis MID - Midterm Instructional Diagnosis QCD - Quick Course Diagnosis TAP - Teaching Analysis Poll TSM - Two Survey Method GIFT - Group Instructional Feedback Technique SFC - Student Feedback through Consensus TABS - Teaching Analysis by Students ICM - Interim Course Feedback SCOT - Students Consulting on Teaching SME - Standardized Midterm Evaluations KQS - Keep Doing, Quit Doing, Start Doing BBQ - Bare Bones Questions SPOI/SPIQ- Student Perceptions of Instruction / Questionnaire SFC - Structured Focus Groups 4
  5. 5. MSF: A Win-Win-Win for Faculty, Students, and Us Instructors: Valuable feedback from students and a teaching expert/consultant while there is still time to make changes Guidance on how to translate feedback into changes in the classroom Improved student learning, enjoyment, course ratings Reflecting on their teaching Students see instructor as a human being who cares about their learning Students: Get a voice in their course Changes that better their experience in the course Chance to reflect on their own learning Faculty Developers: Make an impact on teaching practices Closer connection with faculty Information on common teaching practices and issues at your school 5
  6. 6. Example MSF Process Description of one way that we do MSF for those unfamiliar with MSF or SGID: 1. Send email to instructors offering & describing MSF service 2. Meet with instructor 3. Instructor leaves class 10-15 minutes before end 4. Introduce and explain MSF to students 5. Students complete anonymous survey with 3 questions 6. Students discuss and share answers to questions 6
  7. 7. Designing and Reflecting on an MSF Service Starting with 4 critical decisions that we’ll discuss: 1.What questions will you use on your MSF survey? 2.How will you introduce and conduct the MSF with students? 3.How will you analyze and report the student feedback to instructors? 4.How can you scale up your MSF service to more instructors? With some additional questions if there is time. Please see the worksheet. 7
  8. 8. 1.Designing Your MSF Questions/Survey What questions will you use on your MSF survey or for discussion? Which questions? What wording? How to get students to focus on learning and constructive feedback? Will you add custom questions for each instructor? Please see the handout with sample MSF questions. 8
  9. 9. 2. Conducting an MSF Session How will you introduce and conduct the MSF with students? How will you start and introduce the session to students? Online or paper? Small groups and consensus or not? How long will it take to do? 9
  10. 10. 3. Analyzing & Reporting MSF to Instructors How will you analyze and report the student feedback to instructors? How will you identify and analyze patterns of student responses? How will you help translate student feedback into actions and strategies the instructor can use that can also improve student learning and engagement? Meet with the instructor? 10
  11. 11. 4. Scaling Up MSF How can you scale up your MSF service to more instructors? How many MSFs can you do now? How long does each one take? How can technology help? Knowledgebase? Smart surveys? Can you recruit and train instructors to help conduct MSF? What is the future of MSF? 11
  12. 12. Additional Questions 5. How will you advertise and explain your MSF service to instructors? 6. How will you assess and improve your MSF process? 7. What do you like about doing MSF? 8. Which aspects of MSF do you see as challenging or in need of improvement? 12
  13. 13. Thank you! MSF Guidebook: http://bit.ly/msfguidebook Doug Holton, Hajara Mahmood, Kathryn Cunningham Center for Teaching & Learning Excellence - Embry-Riddle, Daytona Beach http://dbctle.erau.edu/

×