Analytical

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Analytical

  1. 1. TEXT TYPES BY WWW.TEXT-TYPES.COM
  2. 2. STAGING/GIVING MOVES TO GENRE ( R hetorical D evelopment) <ul><li>Each genre has its function/social purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Each genre has its text/generic structure </li></ul><ul><li>Each genre uses different language features </li></ul>www.text-types.com
  3. 3. ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION
  4. 4. Analytical Exposition <ul><li>To persuade the reader or listener that there is something that, certainly, needs to get attention </li></ul><ul><li>To analyze a topic and to persuade the reader that this opinion is correct and supported by arguments </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: argumentative essay, exploratory essay </li></ul>
  5. 5. Generic structure of Analytical Exposition <ul><li>THESIS </li></ul><ul><li>- Position: introduces topic and indicates writer’s position. </li></ul><ul><li>- Preview: give outlines of the arguments to be presented. </li></ul><ul><li>ARGUMENTS </li></ul><ul><li>- Point: restates main arguments </li></ul><ul><li>- Elaboration: elaborate or develop and support each point/the argument </li></ul><ul><li>with evidence, facts, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>REITERATION </li></ul><ul><li>restates writer’s position </li></ul>
  6. 6. Language Features of Analytical Exposition <ul><li>Focus on generic human and non-human participants, e.g.: car, pollution, leaded petrol car </li></ul><ul><li>Use abstract noun, e.g.: policy, government </li></ul><ul><li>Use of relational processes, e.g.: It is important </li></ul><ul><li>Modal verbs, e.g.: we must preserve </li></ul><ul><li>Modal adverbs, e.g.: certainly we. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Connective or Use of internal conjunction to state argument, e.g.: first, secondly, then, finally) </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluative language, e.g.: important, valuable, trustworthy, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Giving reasons through causal conjunction </li></ul><ul><li>(e.g. so, thus, therefore, hence) </li></ul><ul><li>Use of present tense </li></ul><ul><li>Passive sentence </li></ul>
  8. 8. Example and Generic Structure <ul><li>CAR SHOULD BE BANNED IN THE CITY </li></ul><ul><li>Theses </li></ul><ul><li>Car should be banned in the city. As we all know, cars create pollution, and cause a lot of road and other accidents. </li></ul><ul><li>Argument </li></ul><ul><li>Firstly, cars, as well as we all k now, contribute to most of the pollution in the world. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Car emit a deadly gas that cause illnesses such as bronchitis; lung cancer, and triggers’ off asthma. Some of these illnesses are so bad that people candled from them. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondly, the city is very busy. Pedestrians wander everywhere and cars commonly hit pedestrians in the city, which causes them to die. Cars today are our roads biggest killers. </li></ul><ul><li>Thirdly, cars are very noisy. If you live in the city, you may find it hard to sleep at night, or concentrate on your homework, and especially talk to someone. </li></ul>
  10. 10. REITERATION <ul><li>In conclusion, cars should be banned from the city for the reasons listed. </li></ul>

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