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Submitted : Dr. EDWIN B.R. GBARGAYE
COURSE Lecturer/Facilitator
AUGUST 22, 2013
Reporters
1.MICHAEL S.WOODS
2.EMMANUEL S. NANOON
3.SELBATU SEKOU
‘Photo courtesy of Google
images. All other intellectual
property rights belong to
Google and/or third parties
Leadership is about
leading people. Power
means many different
things to different people.
For some, power is seen as
corr...
 Is simply defined as the actions of leading a
group of people or organization.
 Leadership is the art of getting people...
LEADERSHIP STYLE
According to Norman H. Schwarzkopf, a German
Nazi’s General in 1936, “he said leadership is the
combinati...
Leadership Styles :
The two most commonly
seen and leadership styles are:
 Transformational Leadership
 Transactional Le...
Transactional VS. Transformational
TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADER TRANSACTIONAL LEADER
This concept was introduced by James
Burns...
Leadership Styles :
As well as looking at these, we also examine:
Autocratic Democratic
Bureaucratic Laissez Faire
Charism...
OTHER TYPES OF LEADERSHIP STYLES
Autocratic: Adapt a dictatorial approach when
allocating task.
Bureaucratic: Follow rules...
Early Theoretical
Assumption of Leadership
EARLY THEORITICAL ASSUMPTIONS OF LEADERSHIP
"GREAT MAN" THEORIES:
Great man theories assume that the capacity for leadersh...
EARLY THEORITICAL ASSUMPTIONS OF LEADERSHIP
TRAITS THEORY:
Trait theories assume that
people inherit certain
qualities and...
EARLY THEORITICAL ASSUMPTIONS OF LEADERSHIP
CONTINGENCY THEORY:
Contingency theories of leadership focus on particular
var...
POWER &
AUTHORITY
Authority:
 Derived from the Latin word auctoritas, meaning influence,
or command.
In English
 Authori...
AUTHORITY & POWER CONTINUES
 Authority is often used interchangeably
with power. However, their meanings differ
 power i...
BASES OF POWER
There are five bases of power that can be divided
into two:
• Power of position (President,
CEO)
• vested b...
Formal Power
COERCIVE POWER
This power is conveyed through fear of losing one’s job, being
demoted, receiving a poor perfo...
Personal Power
Referent power
is based upon the individual's personal
qualities, such as innate charisma, the
respect and ...
To sum up, the presentation
reveals how leaders gain and use
power in ethical ways within the
context of organization. Lea...
The concepts of power and leadership have been and
will continue to be interconnected. While an individual
may exert power...
Effective leaders do not engage in unethical conduct nor display the
characteristics associated with an abrasive personali...
If leaders exercise authority over others with sensitivity, avoid
dominating or threatening them, and rely on their expert...
REFERENCE
1.Brown, L.D. (1986). Power outside organizational
paradigms. Lessons from community partnerships. In S.
Srivast...
Leadership and Power Within the Organization
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Leadership and Power Within the Organization

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Definition, styles, types of power

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  • Thanks So Much Dr. Gbargaye for such a knowledge obtained in OB. I remain grateful to God first, for the opportunity to benefit from your lectures at the FMTP
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Leadership and Power Within the Organization

  1. 1. Submitted : Dr. EDWIN B.R. GBARGAYE COURSE Lecturer/Facilitator AUGUST 22, 2013
  2. 2. Reporters 1.MICHAEL S.WOODS 2.EMMANUEL S. NANOON 3.SELBATU SEKOU
  3. 3. ‘Photo courtesy of Google images. All other intellectual property rights belong to Google and/or third parties
  4. 4. Leadership is about leading people. Power means many different things to different people. For some, power is seen as corrupt. For others, the more power they have, the more successful they feel. For even others, power is of no interest at all.
  5. 5.  Is simply defined as the actions of leading a group of people or organization.  Leadership is the art of getting people to do something because they want to do it. (Sal F. Marino) 1936 Leadership Defined:  Peter Druker is quoted as saying, the leader who work most effectively, it seems to me, never say “I.” And that is not because they have trained themselves not to say “I.” They don’t think “I.” They think “we”; they think “team.” Source: Matias Eusterbrock
  6. 6. LEADERSHIP STYLE According to Norman H. Schwarzkopf, a German Nazi’s General in 1936, “he said leadership is the combination of strategy and character.” Strategy & Character Source: Annalee Newitz
  7. 7. Leadership Styles : The two most commonly seen and leadership styles are:  Transformational Leadership  Transactional Leadership Transactional leadership is more effective in stable and predictable environments, whereas an inspirational style is more likely to appear in periods of rapid and discontinuous social and political change. Source: The Moscow Times
  8. 8. Transactional VS. Transformational TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADER TRANSACTIONAL LEADER This concept was introduced by James Burns in 1978 in his description of political leader. This type of leadership is more managerial in nature. He described it as a process in which “leaders and followers help each other to advance to a higher level of morale and motivation.” Staff “obey” the leader and in return are paid. They have little or no say in their reward except that which is determined by the leader. They are also subject to punishment if tasks are not carry on correctly. The opportunity for creativity, self development and expression is
  9. 9. Leadership Styles : As well as looking at these, we also examine: Autocratic Democratic Bureaucratic Laissez Faire Charismatic Task Oriented
  10. 10. OTHER TYPES OF LEADERSHIP STYLES Autocratic: Adapt a dictatorial approach when allocating task. Bureaucratic: Follow rules and procedures to the letter and without deviation. Charismatic: Inspire and enthuse staff. Democratic: Involve team member in decision making but leader made the final decision. Laissez Faire: Team has complete control over their work or assignment. Task Oriented: Ensure deadlines are met.
  11. 11. Early Theoretical Assumption of Leadership
  12. 12. EARLY THEORITICAL ASSUMPTIONS OF LEADERSHIP "GREAT MAN" THEORIES: Great man theories assume that the capacity for leadership is inherent – that great leaders are born, not made. Interest in leadership increased during the early part of the twentieth century. Early leadership theories focused on what qualities distinguished between leaders and followers, While many different leadership theories have emerged, most can be classified as:
  13. 13. EARLY THEORITICAL ASSUMPTIONS OF LEADERSHIP TRAITS THEORY: Trait theories assume that people inherit certain qualities and traits that make them better suited to leadership. Trait theories often identify particular personality or behavioral characteristics shared by leaders.
  14. 14. EARLY THEORITICAL ASSUMPTIONS OF LEADERSHIP CONTINGENCY THEORY: Contingency theories of leadership focus on particular variables related to the environment that might determine which particular style of leadership is best suited for the situation.
  15. 15. POWER & AUTHORITY Authority:  Derived from the Latin word auctoritas, meaning influence, or command. In English  Authority can be used to mean power given by the state (in the form of Members of Parliament, Judges, Police Officers, etc.) or by academic knowledge of an area (someone can be an authority on a subject). http://irnmike.blogspot.com
  16. 16. AUTHORITY & POWER CONTINUES  Authority is often used interchangeably with power. However, their meanings differ  power is defined as "the ability to influence somebody to do something that he/she would not have done“  Authority refers to a claim of legitimacy, the justification and right to exercise that power.  With authority comes power. The two go hand in hand. If you have authority but no power, you cannot expect to be respected or even acknowledged as an authority figure. To have power without authority is pointless. Even if you show dominance and power, it does not mean that you have the respect or the ability to enforce.
  17. 17. BASES OF POWER There are five bases of power that can be divided into two: • Power of position (President, CEO) • vested by the position he or she holds. Formal • Influence over others, • the source of which resides in the person Personal
  18. 18. Formal Power COERCIVE POWER This power is conveyed through fear of losing one’s job, being demoted, receiving a poor performance review,, etc. Forma REWARD POWER Reward power is conveyed through rewarding individuals for compliance with one’s wishes. This may be done through giving bonuses, raises, a promotion, extra time off from work, etc. For example, the supervisor who provides employees comp time when they meet an objective she sets for a project. Legitimate power comes from having a position power within an organization, such as being the boss or a key member of a leadership team. This power comes when employees in the organization recognize the authority of the individual. For example, the CEO who determines the overall direction of the company and the resource needs for the company.
  19. 19. Personal Power Referent power is based upon the individual's personal qualities, such as innate charisma, the respect and admiration. Expert power comes from one’s experiences, skills or knowledge. As we gain experience in particular areas, and become thought leaders in those areas, we begin to gather expert power that can be utilized to get others to help us meet our goals. For example, the Project Manager who is an expert at solving particularly challenging problems to ensure a project stays on track.
  20. 20. To sum up, the presentation reveals how leaders gain and use power in ethical ways within the context of organization. Leaders who work to increase their personal power, persuasiveness, and expertise will enhance their effectiveness. SUMMARY
  21. 21. The concepts of power and leadership have been and will continue to be interconnected. While an individual may exert power without being a leader, an individual cannot be a leader without having power.
  22. 22. Effective leaders do not engage in unethical conduct nor display the characteristics associated with an abrasive personality, which would cause them to under-utilize the talents of their employees. Effective leaders increase their personal power by empowering others in the organization.
  23. 23. If leaders exercise authority over others with sensitivity, avoid dominating or threatening them, and rely on their expertise and personality to influence them, they can enhance their effectiveness.
  24. 24. REFERENCE 1.Brown, L.D. (1986). Power outside organizational paradigms. Lessons from community partnerships. In S. Srivastva & Associates 2.(Eds.), Executive power: How executives influence people and organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 3.Cangemi, J. (1992). Some observations of successful leaders, and their use of power and authority. Education, 112, 499-505. 4.Etzioni, A. (1978). Comparative analysis of complex organizations. In D. Hampton, C. Summer, & R. Weber (Eds.),

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