Eric Gal
ENG 322
Dr. Reynolds
April 27, 2010

           Lesson Plan: Deconstructing Utopia and The Once and Future King
 ...
•   identifying and analyzing text components (such as organizational
               structures, story elements, organizat...
•   selecting, monitoring, and modifying as necessary reading strategies
               appropriate to readers' purpose.
 ...
•   analyzing and evaluating the connections or relationships between and
               among ideas, concepts, characters...
2. Materials: Copies of The Once and Future King, daybooks.

3. Strategies:

     •   Students will, in groups, find textu...
•   Character Journal: Write a journal entry from the viewpoint of a character in the
    story who is not Arthur (like La...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lesson Plan: Deconstructing Utopia and The Once and Future King

2,861 views

Published on

Dear Reader,
Enjoy my lesson plan. I designed it to teach 9th grade students about utopia and dystopia by looking at The Once and Future King. We will deconstruct the idea of a utopia, or perfect world/society, by using textual evidence to complicate the idea of Camelot as a utopia. Students will discuss the effectiveness of Arthur’s Right-over-Might policy, what some of the consequences were for establishing this rule, and how the society was ultimately destroyed. Students will also write a character journal in which they write their character’s opinion of Arthur’s policy, using the text as a source. Students will also discuss author intent as well as relate utopian concepts to modern societies and ways of thinking. I put a lot of work into this lesson plan. It meets many NCSOS requirements for English I dealing with reading and responding to texts, as well as studying and making arguments based on textual evidence.
Thanks,
Eric Gal

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,861
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Lesson Plan: Deconstructing Utopia and The Once and Future King

  1. 1. Eric Gal ENG 322 Dr. Reynolds April 27, 2010 Lesson Plan: Deconstructing Utopia and The Once and Future King English I (9th grade) 1. Objectives (as outlined by SCOS): Objective 1.02 Respond reflectively (individually and in groups) to a variety of expressive texts (e.g., memoirs, vignettes, narratives, diaries, monologues, personal responses) in a way that offers an audience: • an understanding of the student's personal reaction to the text. • a sense of how the reaction results from a careful consideration of the text. an awareness of how personal and cultural influences affect the response. Objective 1.03 Demonstrate the ability to read, listen to and view a variety of increasingly complex print and non-print expressive texts appropriate to grade level and course literary focus, by: • identifying and analyzing text components (such as organizational structures, story elements, organizational features) and evaluating their impact on the text. • providing textual evidence to support understanding of and reader's response to text. • demonstrating comprehension of main idea and supporting details. • summarizing key events and/or points from text. • making inferences, predicting, and drawing conclusions based on text. • identifying and analyzing personal, social, historical or cultural influences, contexts, or biases. • making connections between works, self and related topics. • analyzing and evaluating the effects of author's craft and style. • analyzing and evaluating the connections or relationships between and among ideas, concepts, characters and/or experiences. • identifying and analyzing elements of expressive environment found in text in light of purpose, audience, and context. Objective 2.01 Demonstrate the ability to read, listen to and view a variety of increasingly complex print and non-print informational texts appropriate to grade level and course literary focus, by: • selecting, monitoring, and modifying as necessary reading strategies appropriate to readers' purpose.
  2. 2. • identifying and analyzing text components (such as organizational structures, story elements, organizational features) and evaluating their impact on the text. • providing textual evidence to support understanding of and reader's response to text. • demonstrating comprehension of main idea and supporting details. • summarizing key events and/or points from text. • making inferences, predicting, and drawing conclusions based on text. • identifying and analyzing personal, social, historical or cultural influences, contexts, or biases. • making connections between works, self and related topics. • analyzing and evaluating the effects of author's craft and style. • analyzing and evaluating the connections or relationships between and among ideas, concepts, characters and/or experiences. • identifying and analyzing elements of informational environment found in text in light of purpose, audience, and context. Objective 3.01 Study argument by: • examining relevant reasons and evidence. • noting the progression of ideas that substantiate the proposal. • analyzing style, tone, and use of language for a particular effect. • identifying and analyzing personal, social, historical, or cultural influences contexts, or biases. • identifying and analyzing rhetorical strategies that support proposals. Objective 3.02 Express an informed opinion that: • states clearly a personal view. • is logical and coherent. • engages the reader's interest or curiosity. Objective 3.03 Support that informed opinion by: • providing relevant and convincing reasons. • using various types of evidence, such as experience or facts. • using appropriate and effective language, reasons, and organizational structure for the audience and purpose. • demonstrating awareness of the possible questions, concerns, or counterarguments of the audience. Objective 3.04 Demonstrate the ability to read, listen to and view a variety of increasingly complex print and non-print argumentative texts appropriate to grade level and course literary focus, by:
  3. 3. • selecting, monitoring, and modifying as necessary reading strategies appropriate to readers' purpose. • identifying and analyzing text components (such as organizational structures, story elements, organizational features) and evaluating their impact on the text. • providing textual evidence to support understanding of and reader's response to text. • demonstrating comprehension of main idea and supporting details. • summarizing key events and/or points from text. • making inferences, predicting, and drawing conclusions based on text. • identifying and analyzing personal, social, historical or cultural influences, contexts, or biases. • making connections between works, self and related topics. • analyzing and evaluating the effects of author's craft and style. • analyzing and evaluating the connections or relationships between and among ideas, concepts, characters and/or experiences. • identifying and analyzing elements of argumentative environment found in text in light of purpose, audience, and context. Objective 4.02 Read and critique various genres by: • using preparation, engagement, and reflection strategies appropriate for the text. • identifying and using standards to evaluate aspects of the work or the work as a whole. • judging the impact of different stylistic and literary devices on the work. Objective 4.03 Demonstrate the ability to read, listen to and view a variety of increasingly complex print and non-print critical texts appropriate to grade level and course literary focus, by: • selecting, monitoring, and modifying as necessary reading strategies appropriate to readers' purpose. • identifying and analyzing text components (such as organizational structures, story elements, organizational features) and evaluating their impact on the text. • providing textual evidence to support understanding of and reader's response to text. • demonstrating comprehension of main idea and supporting details. • summarizing key events and/or points from text. • making inferences, predicting, and drawing conclusions based on text. • identifying and analyzing personal, social, historical or cultural influences, contexts, or biases. • making connections between works, self and related topics. • analyzing and evaluating the effects of author's craft and style.
  4. 4. • analyzing and evaluating the connections or relationships between and among ideas, concepts, characters and/or experiences. • identifying and analyzing elements of critical environment found in text in light of purpose, audience, and context. Objective 5.01 Read and analyze various literary works by: • using effective reading strategies for preparation, engagement, reflection. • interpreting literary devices such as allusion, symbolism, figurative language, flashback, dramatic irony, dialogue, diction, and imagery. • understanding the importance of tone, mood, diction, and style. • explaining and interpreting archetypal characters, themes, settings. • explaining how point of view is developed and its effect on literary texts. • determining a character's traits from his/her actions, speech, appearance, or what others say about him or her. • making thematic connections among literary texts and media and contemporary issues. • understanding the importance of cultural and historical impact on literary texts. • producing creative responses that follow the conventions of a specific genre and using appropriate literary devices for that genre. Objective 5.03 Demonstrate the ability to read, listen to and view a variety of increasingly complex print and non-print literacy texts appropriate to grade level and course literary focus, by: • selecting, monitoring, and modifying as necessary reading strategies appropriate to readers' purpose. • identifying and analyzing text components (such as organizational structures, story elements, organizational features) and evaluating their impact on the text. • providing textual evidence to support understanding of and reader's response to text. • demonstrating comprehension of main idea and supporting details. • summarizing key events and/or points from text. • making inferences, predicting, and drawing conclusions based on text. • identifying and analyzing personal, social, historical or cultural influences, contexts, or biases. • making connections between works, self and related topics. • analyzing and evaluating the effects of author's craft and style. • analyzing and evaluating the connections or relationships between and among ideas, concepts, characters and/or experiences. • identifying and analyzing elements of literary environment found in text in light of purpose, audience, and context.
  5. 5. 2. Materials: Copies of The Once and Future King, daybooks. 3. Strategies: • Students will, in groups, find textual evidence supporting complications within Arthur’s perfect utopia and how these complications lead to a dystopia. • Students will write a journal entry from the perspective of a character other than Arthur and reflect that character’s view of Arthur’s society and reasons for that view. 4. Procedure: a. Focus/Review of Previous Lesson • Write into the day: Describe the perfect society. What sort of government runs it? How are people expected to behave? What are some laws/rules of your perfect society? • Quick review of the ending of The Once and Future King: What happens to Arthur? What does he do before the battle to ensure that his story is told? b. Outline Today’s Lesson • Focus/Review • Discussion of utopia and dystopia in relation to the text. • Find evidence of dystopia in the text. • Read a passage and discuss a large contradiction in Arthur’s utopia. • Write character journals. • Author’s intent and closing remarks. c. Perform Lesson (using specific step-by-step methods as needed) • Discussion: -What is a utopia? “An ideal place or state” or “any visionary system of political or social perfection” (dictionary.com). -What is a dystopia? “A society characterized by human misery, as squalor, oppression, disease, and overcrowding” (dictionary.com). • Students, in groups of four, will find clues in the text that complicate Arthur’s utopia and show signs of dystopia. • Groups will share their discoveries with the class. • Look at a passage in the text: A few pages into chapter XXVII of “The Ill-Made Knight.” • Discussion: -What is Arthur’s conclusion after his discussion with Merlyn? -How does Arthur describe his policy to Lancelot and Guenever? -What contradiction is Arthur presenting regarding his own policy? -Was Arthur’s policy a good policy? Was it necessary? Does Might make Right?
  6. 6. • Character Journal: Write a journal entry from the viewpoint of a character in the story who is not Arthur (like Lancelot, Guenever, Mordred, Gawain, etc.) Be sure to use this character’s voice accurately, meaning consistency with the character’s viewpoint in the novel. Express your character’s opinion on the Might vs. Right issue and the role it plays in the society of Camelot, as well as reasons for that character’s opinion. Much of your information will come from clues within the text. Please list the page number(s) you used as references at the top of your paper next to your name. d. Reflection and Closing Statements • T.H. White -Uses many modern references, particularly to World War II. -What point do you think he is trying to make? Do you think he is right? -Can we name some utopian societies? Can we point out flaws in those societies? • Write out of the day: Look at your write-in exercise for today. What complications can you see in your utopia? What are some possible consequences of your perfect society? • Ticket out the door: Share one potential flaw in your society with the class.

×