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Digital Skills Gap Peer Learning Activity - Educators' Digital Competence for Learning in the Digital Age

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Presentation of Christine Redecker, Andreia Inamorato & Yves Punie, European Commission, Joint Research Centre at the Digital Skills Gap PLA (Peer Learning Activity) hosted by SRCE in Zagreb, Croatia

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Digital Skills Gap Peer Learning Activity - Educators' Digital Competence for Learning in the Digital Age

  1. 1. The European Commission’s science and knowledge service Joint Research Centre Educators Digital Competence for Learning in the Digital Age Christine Redecker Andreia Inamorato Yves Punie DG JRC – Directorate Innovation and Growth Unit B4 Human Capital and Employment Background information 10 November 2017
  2. 2. The European Commission’s science and knowledge service Joint Research Centre
  3. 3. The European Commission’s science and knowledge service Joint Research Centre
  4. 4. DigCompEdu in a nutshell
  5. 5. DigCompEdu explained
  6. 6. The pedagogic core
  7. 7. Core Competences for Open Teaching In a traditional classroom, 3.1 is the most important competence for educators To plan for and implement digital devices and resources into the teaching process, so as to enhance the effectiveness of teaching interventions. To appropriately manage and orchestrate digital teaching interventions. To experiment with and develop new formats and pedagogical methods for instruction.
  8. 8. Core Competences for Open Teaching The transformative potential of digital technologies Learning in the digital age
  9. 9. To use digital technologies to foster and enhance learner collaboration. To enable learners to use digital technologies as part of collaborative assignments, as a means of enhancing communication, collaboration and collaborative knowledge creation. To use digital technologies to support learners' self-regulated learning. To enable learners to plan, monitor and reflect on their own learning, provide evidence of progress, share insights and come up with creative solutions. Student collaboration and self-directed learning The two main pillars of learning in the digital age
  10. 10. Consequences If student collaboration and self-regulated learning become the norm, new forms of providing guidance and support are needed. To use digital technologies and services to enhance the interaction with learners, individually and collectively, within and outside the learning session. To use digital technologies to offer timely and targeted guidance and assistance.
  11. 11. Opportunities & Challenges Digital age learning puts the learner at the centre
  12. 12. Challenges To ensure accessibility to learning resources and activities, for all learners, including those with special needs. To consider and respond to learners' (digital) expectations, abilities, uses and misconceptions, as well as contextual, physical or cognitive constraints to their use of digital technologies.
  13. 13. Opportunities To use digital technologies to address learners' diverse learning needs, by allowing learners to advance at different levels and speeds, and to follow individual learning pathways and objectives.
  14. 14. Opportunities To use digital technologies to foster learners' active and creative engagement with a subject matter. To use digital technologies within pedagogic strategies that foster learners' transversal skills, deep thinking and creative expression. To open up learning to new, real-world contexts, which involve learners themselves in hands-on activities, scientific investigation or complex problem solving, or in other ways increase learners' active involvement in complex subject matters.
  15. 15. Widening the scope: A holistic view on educators' digital competence
  16. 16. The pedagogic core
  17. 17. Digital Resources Finding, creating and sharing resources that are tailored to the learning context and individual learners' needs
  18. 18. Assessment Innovatively using the power of the digital for enhancing assessment and feedback
  19. 19. Widening the scope further: Life in the digital age
  20. 20. Professional engagement Enabling communication and collaboration strategies, within and beyond the organisation Enhancing and developing pedagogical competences
  21. 21. Facilitating Learners' Digital Competence Making learners fit for life in the digital age
  22. 22. How can teachers develop their educator-specific digital competence?
  23. 23. Competence Progression  Educators' professional digital competence development is a continuous endeavour – no matter which stage they are at  Different levels mean different focus areas and strategies for professional development
  24. 24. Example: Differentiation & Personalisation
  25. 25. Example: Differentiation & Personalisation
  26. 26. Thank you Christine.redecker@ec.europa.eu https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/digcompedu

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