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Frames: Notes on Improvisation and Design

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Social spaces, private spaces, unfamiliar spaces—no matter where, people can detect even subtle frameworks and etiquettes. As our relationship to products, services, and to one another has been transformed over the past few years, entirely new frameworks have emerged.

These conditions signal a shift. People are being asked to improvise, to frame their own experiences. The designer merely sets out opportunities for people to use—to perceive connections and take advantage (or not) of a framework. But how do people know how to improvise?

Drawing on improvised models from urban planning to jazz, we investigate improvisation at work and illustrate directions interactions designers might take in understanding how frameworks take hold.

http://interaction.ixda.org/program/sessions/interaction-and-improv/

Published in: Design, Technology, Business

Frames: Notes on Improvisation and Design

  1. INTERACTION 10 FEBRUARY 5 2010 FRAMES: NOTES ON IMPROVISATION AND DESIGN LIZ DANZICO MFA INTERACTION DESIGN / SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS
  2. How can we create meaning?
  3. Where is the balance?
  4. What if we allow improvisation?
  5. We create FRAMES that allow people to IMPROVISE.
  6. DEFINITION FRAME Unstated rules implicitly set by the character of some entity where the interaction occurs
  7. DEFINITION IMPROVISE Creating in the moment in response to environment; results in invention of new patterns, practices, structures, behaviors
  8. IMPROVISATION CREATOR CONSUMER
  9. TODAY History Relevance Improv in practice Meaning for design Future contributions
  10. 01 Some history, borrowed
  11. 1970s
  12. NYC 1959
  13. JOHN COLTRANE, MILES DAVIS, 1959
  14. MILES DAVIS, 1959
  15. MILES DAVIS, 1959
  16. Classical notation:
  17. Jazz notation:
  18. GIANT STEPS Courtesy Dan Cohen
  19. Modal jazz:
  20. 4 g4 qq qq qqqq
  21. MUSIC FRAMES Classical Leaves no room for participation Requires prior knowledge Judged on “right way” Evaluated as fixed in time Viewed as sets of “original works” Stability
  22. MUSIC FRAMES Classical Jazz Leaves no room for participation Based on participatory methods Requires prior knowledge Requires little prior knowledge Judged on “right way” Judged on deviation from original Evaluated as fixed in time Evaluated as interactive Viewed as sets of “original works” Viewed as “interpreted works” Stability Creative instability
  23. DESIGN FRAMES Closed Required specialized knowledge Judged on “right way” Left no room for participation Evaluated as fixed in time Viewed as original work
  24. DESIGN FRAMES Closed Emergent Required specialized knowledge Requires no specialized knowledge Judged on “right way” Judged on deviation from original Left no room for participation Based on participatory methods Evaluated as fixed in time Evaluated as interactive Viewed as original work Viewed as mediated content
  25. SHIFTS Closed Emergent Artifacts Behaviors Predetermined Present
  26. ORAL TRADITION Orality + Literacy
  27. MILMAN PARRY
  28. 02 What does improv look like?
  29. “improvisation”
  30. “throw together”
  31. “speak off the cuff”
  32. “whip up”
  33. “off the top of my head”
  34. “without a net”
  35. “fly by the seat of my pants”
  36. 4 PATTERNS Attributes Present Involves the audience Detectable Requires no pre-knowledge Responsive Defines parameters Additive Accepts all offers
  37. 3 people 1 sentence “Yes, and...”
  38. “OVERTHINKING”
  39. 03 Why is improv relevant today?
  40. TRADITIONAL PRACTICE CONSUMER CREATOR
  41. TRADITIONAL PRACTICE CONSUMER CREATOR Design Release Use
  42. EVOLUTION WITH USE CO-CREATOR CREATOR Design Release Use
  43. PRINT VERSUS DIGITAL CONSUMER CREATOR Compose Transmit Interpret
  44. ORAL TRADITION ORAL POET AUDIENCE Compose Interpret Transmit
  45. DESIGN PRACTICES Traditional: Emerging: designing products designing for a purpose vis communication design for experiencing interior space design for emotion product design for interacting information design for sustainability architecture for serving planning for transforming SOURCE: Liz Sanders & Pieter Jan Stappers
  46. Designing for improvisation
  47. 04 What does improv suggest for design?
  48. 4 PATTERNS Attributes Present Involves the audience Detectable Requires no pre-knowledge Responsive Defines parameters Additive Accepts all offers
  49. 1 Present: Involve the audience
  50. STREET VENDORS
  51. STREET VENDORS
  52. 2 Responsive: Define parameters
  53. hello health
  54. 3 Detectable: No pre-knowledge
  55. JETBLUE STORY BOOTH
  56. 4 Additive: Accepting all offers
  57. POP-UP LUNCH
  58. ZERO ENERGY MEDIA WALL
  59. 05 What can designers contribute?
  60. Facilitators of improv?
  61. POSSIBLE FUTURES ?
  62. POSSIBLE FUTURES
  63. POSSIBLE FUTURES
  64. POSSIBLE FUTURES
  65. POSSIBLE FUTURES
  66. POSSIBLE FUTURES
  67. PHOTO CREDITS flickr.com/photos/kazzajimmy/ jazzloftproject.org/ scientificblogging.com/news_releases/ greenpix.org/ “YES, AND:” flickr.com/photos/opalsson/ flickr.com/photos/arcticpuppy/ flickr.com/photos/kaeru/3133393620/ flickr.com/photos/27052570@N03/ flickr.com/photos/21204781@N07/ flickr.com/photos/watz/ flickr.com/photos/diebmx/ flickr.com/photos/matrixsynth/ flickr.com/photos/sigma/ PAPERS: maketools.com/pdfs/CoCreation_Sanders_Stappers_08_preprint.pdf
  68. THANK YOU. LIZ DANZICO MFA INTERACTION DESIGN / SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS @bobulate

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