140829 Edanz Mie

266 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
266
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
28
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

140829 Edanz Mie

  1. 1. Publishing Clinical Research: Increasing your chances of acceptance Jeffrey Robens, PhD Senior Research Consultant Education Group Leader Mie University 29 August 2014
  2. 2. Be an effective communicator Your goal is not only to be published, but also to be widely read/cited  Good experimental design S  Logically present your work in your manuscript  Choose the best journal to reach your target audience  Convey the significance of your work to journal editors
  3. 3. Section 1 Good experimental design
  4. 4. Experimental design What do international journal editors want? Interesting to journal’s readership High quality research Increase impact Original and novel research Well-designed Clinical applications study
  5. 5. Experimental design What do international journal editors want? Clinical relevance Technical quality Novelty CT scans of 1000 patients with gliomas
  6. 6. Experimental design What do international journal editors want? Clinical relevance Technical quality Novelty CT scans of Japanese glioma patients raised in Japan or the US
  7. 7. Experimental design What do international journal editors want? Clinical relevance Technical quality Novelty CT scans of younger and older Japanese glioma patients
  8. 8. Experimental design Clinical research that has impact 1. Read primary literature 2. Read systematic reviews and meta-analyses 3. Identify an important question • Is the question focused? • Do you have the expertise/resources? • What is new? • How is it clinically useful?
  9. 9. Experimental design Clinical trial registration Where to register? Not required for observational studies ClinicalTrials.gov UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (umin.ac.jp) Treatments/interventions are not assigned by the investigator Retrospective registration is sometimes possible Should be registered before journal submission
  10. 10. Section 2 Manuscript structure
  11. 11. Manuscript structure Reporting guidelines CONSORT Randomized clinical trials STROBE Observational studies PRISMA Systematic reviews & Meta-analyses CARE Case reports http://www.equator-network.org/
  12. 12. Manuscript structure Writing clinical abstracts Concise summary of your study Background Why does this trial/case need to be reported? Results Treatment outcomes Adverse events Conclusion Clinical relevance Learning points Patients and methods Patient information Interventions given List source of funding and trial registration number after abstract
  13. 13. Manuscript structure Introduction General introduction Current state of the field Problem in the field Aims Specific aims
  14. 14. Manuscript structure Introduction – Structure of ideas Molecular markers help clinicians manage metastatic breast cancer systemically by indicating when endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, or HER2–targeted therapy (such as trastuzumab or lapatinib) is appropriate. However, previous studies have suggested the possibility of discordant HER2 status between primary and metastatic tumors. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous studies evaluating whether clinical factors affect these discordance rates. Aims: Determine the discordance rates of HER2 in primary and metastatic tumors and determine if they are influenced by trastuzumab and/or chemotherapy Niikura et al. J Clin Oncol 2011; 30: 593–599.
  15. 15. Manuscript structure Introduction – Structure of ideas Importance of biomarkers for determining appropriate therapy Potential difference between primary and metastatic tumors Not known what causes this difference Aims: Determine the discordance rates of HER2 in primary and Study metastatic objectives tumors and determine if they are influenced by trastuzumab and/or chemotherapy Niikura et al. J Clin Oncol 2011; 30: 593–599.
  16. 16. Manuscript structure Methods How the study was done Treatments (controls) Patient management Follow-up Quantification methods Statistical tests Participants used Demographics Enrollment procedure Inclusion/exclusion criteria Data analysis Study design
  17. 17. Manuscript structure Results 1. Study design 2. Treatment efficacy 3. Safety Each subsection corresponds to one figure What you found, not what it means Logical presentation Subsections Factual description
  18. 18. Manuscript structure Discussion Summary of findings Relevance of findings Similarities/differences Unexpected results Negative results Limitations Clinical implications
  19. 19. Manuscript structure Linking your ideas General background Current state of the field Problem in the field Objectives Methodology Results and figures Summary of findings Clinical relevance Clinical implications Introduction Methods Results Discussion Logically links your ideas throughout your manuscript
  20. 20. Manuscript structure Case reports – essential elements  Presents an important unreported case  Tell a story, a timeline of events  Short, 500–1500 words  Needs to have educational value in addition to novelty Kukreja et al. BMJ Case Reports 2011.
  21. 21. Manuscript structure Background Case reports – structure of ideas Concise description of the disease or treatment Case presentation Patient information Diagnostic tests and results Interventions Follow-up Discussion Interpret the findings Relationship with other cases Implications for the field • Clinical implications • Educational value • Future directions
  22. 22. Section 3 Communicating with journals
  23. 23. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan Factors to consider Aims & scope Readership Open access Impact factor Indexing Which factor is most important to you?
  24. 24. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan Evaluating significance Novelty How new are your findings? Relevance How broadly relevant are your findings? Appeal What are the important clinical implications?
  25. 25. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan Journal Selector www.edanzediting.co.jp/journal_selector Insert your proposed abstract
  26. 26. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan Journal Selector www.edanzediting.co.jp/journal_selector Recommended journals Filter by: • Impact factor • Publishing frequency • Open access
  27. 27. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan www.edanzediting.co.jp/journal_selector www.biomedcentral.com/authors/authorfaq/findout Journal’s aims & scope, IF, and publication frequency Journal Selector Similar published articles Are they currently publishing similar articles? Have you cited any of these articles?
  28. 28. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan Dear Dr Lippman, Editor’s name Manuscript title Please find enclosed our manuscript entitled “Evaluation of the Glasgow prognostic score in patients undergoing curative resection for breast cancer liver metastases,” which we would like to submit for publication as an Original Article in the Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is of value for a variety of tumours. Several studies have investigated the prognostic value of the GPS in patients with metastatic breast cancer, but few studies have performed such an investigation for patients undergoing liver resection for liver metastases. Furthermore, there are currently no studies that have examined the prognostic value of the modified GPS (mGPS) in these patients. The present study evaluated the mGPS in terms of its prognostic value for postoperative death in patients undergoing liver resection for breast cancer liver metastases. A total of 318 patients with breast cancer liver metastases who underwent hepatectomy over a 15-year period were included in this study. The mGPS was calculated based on the levels of C-reactive protein and albumin, and the disease-free survival and cancer-specific survival rates were evaluated in relation to the mGPS. Prognostic significance was retrospectively analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Overall, the results showed a significant association between cancer-specific survival and the mGPS and carcinoembryonic antigen level, and a higher mGPS was associated with increased aggressiveness of liver recurrence and poorer survival in these patients. This study is the first to demonstrate that the preoperative mGPS, a simple clinical tool, is a useful prognostic factor for postoperative survival in patients undergoing curative resection for breast cancer liver metastases. This information is immediately clinically applicable for oncologists treating such patients. As a premier journal covering the broad field of cancer, we believe that the Breast Cancer Research and Treatment is the perfect platform from which to share our results with the international medical community. Give the background to the research What was done and what was found Interest to journal’s readers A good cover letter We would also like to suggest the following reviewers for our manuscript… Publication type Recommend reviewers Publication ethics disclaimers
  29. 29. Communicating Coverage and with Staffing journals Plan Recommending reviewers Where to find them? From your reading/references, networking at conferences How senior? Aim for mid-level researchers Who to avoid? Collaborators (past 5 years), researchers from same institution International list: 1 or 2 from Asia, 1 or 2 from Europe, and 1 or 2 from North America Have they published in your target journal?
  30. 30. Acceptance checklist  Well-designed study with proper controls  Publically registered trial  Logically organized manuscript  Appropriate journal selection  Cover letter (+ CONSORT/STROBE)
  31. 31. Any questions? Thank you! Jeffrey Robens: jrobens@edanzgroup.com www.edanzediting.co.jp/mie_2014 Download and further reading @JournalAdvisor Follow us on Twitter facebook.com/EdanzEditing Like us on Facebook

×