Co-sponsored by
© 2010 edWeb.net, IESD, MCH Strategic Data, MMS Education
Social Networking in
Education:
Practices, Polic...
2
Lisa Schmucki
Founder/CEO
edWeb.net
Susan Keipper Meell
CEO
MMS Education
Dr. Jay Sivin-Kachala
Vice President
Interacti...
Social Networking and Education
 Which educators are the most likely to participate in
social networking, which are the l...
The Social Networking Revolution
Teens and Adults on Social Networks
5
The Most Popular Sites
6
Social Networks Are Ideal for Creating
Professional Learning Communities
Research, Policy, and Funding Drivers
8
9
Social networks can be used to provide
educators with career-long personal
learning tools and resources that make
profes...
10
A Collaborative Research Effort
Phase I – Quantitative Study
Goals
To benchmark attitudes, perceptions and
utilization of social networking websites
and c...
12
Phase I Methodology
• Deployed by MMS Education to 82,900 educators; emails provided by
MCH
• Online survey conducted b...
13
61% of educators surveyed already
belong to one or more SN websites
Question: Social networks are growing rapidly in po...
14
Age matters – direct correlation between age
and membership in social networks
78%
65%
47%
22%
35%
53%
0%
20%
40%
60%
8...
1%
1%
1%
1%
2%
2%
2%
5%
11%
14%
20%
85%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
We the Teachers
Teachade
Tapped In
Learn Central
We Are Te...
1%
2%
2%
2%
3%
4%
5%
12%
13%
16%
76%
78%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
Tapped In
We the Teachers
Teachade
Ning in Education
We A...
2%
4%
9%
21%
13%
77%
4%
8%
16%
17%
18%
81%
1%
4%
9%
9%
25%
91%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
edWeb.net
Classroom 2.0
Ning
Linked...
85%
72%
47%
18%
5%
2%
6%
2%
30%
15%
8%
1%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
To connect with friends
To connect with family
members
T...
19
Looking ahead, educators are more likely to join
a social networking site dedicated to education
Question: How likely a...
20
Educators see value for using social networking
in many areas of education
21
Educators who have joined a social network
are more positive than those who have not
35%
29%
31%
27%
39%
40%
38%
41%
40...
Top Four Reasons Educators See Value in Use of
Social Networking in Education
0% 20% 40% 60% 80%
Improve schoolwide
commun...
Least Popular Reasons for Using
Social Networking in Education
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%
Find job and career
opportunitie...
24
Concerns include privacy, lack of time,
email overload and restricted access.
Question: Please indicate the concerns yo...
Phase I - Key Findings
• Educators see that social networking sites can have
value in education:
- As a way for educators ...
Phase I - Key Findings
• Teachers and librarians are looking to principals and
school leaders to provide:
- Policies and g...
Action Plans and Recommendations
• Listen Before you Speak
• Join social networking groups related to your program or
prod...
• Begin using Social Networking with Customers
• Using social networking for new customer acquisition is most
difficult
• ...
• Build for Separate Audiences (if it makes sense)
• Parents, educators, students
• Social Networking is 24/7
• You may ne...
30
Goals of Phase II
• Conduct an in-depth discussion with principals who have
used social networking in their professiona...
31
Phase II Methodology
• Conducted by Interactive Educational Systems Design
(IESD) late February through early March 201...
32
Phase II Question Focuses
• Personal experience with social networking and the
use of social networking in education
• ...
33
Phase II Question Focuses
• School/district policies related to social networking
• Principals’ views of their role in ...
34
Phase II Key Findings
Advantages to student use of social networking
About half of the principals described potential
e...
35
Phase II Key Findings
Interest and comfort level of students with social
networking in education
About half of the prin...
36
Phase II Key Findings
Advantages to educator use of social networking
About half of the principals described the value ...
37
Phase II Key Findings
Interest and comfort level of educators with social
networking in education
Colleagues. Most of t...
38
Phase II Key Findings
Interest and comfort level of educators with social
networking in education
Age of the educator. ...
39
Phase II Key Findings
School/district policies related to social
networking
About half of the principals indicated that...
40
Phase II Key Findings
Use of social networking and Web 2.0 in local
schools and districts
Most of the principals report...
41
Phase II Key Findings
Issue: Teacher-student social contact
Teacher-student social contact via social networking
(e.g.,...
42
Phase II Key Findings
Issue: Need for educational focus
Use of social networking in schools by both
educators and stude...
43
Phase II Key Findings
Issue: Legal concerns
Legal concerns are one of the factors to be
considered in implementing soci...
44
Phase II Key Findings
Issue: Lack of time
Lack of time is one of the barriers to implementation
of social networking in...
45
Join and explore existing education-focused
social media websites:
edWeb.net
WeAreTeachers
We the Teachers
Classroom 2....
46
Visit and explore websites focused on student
collaboration projects:
ThinkQuest World Portal
GlobalSchoolNet
ePals
iEA...
47
Identify educators and instructional designers
that have experience in developing collaborative
Web 2.0 projects.
Consi...
48
When developing social media experiences for
educators or students:
• Start with education-focused goals and objectives...
Do you have a social media strategy?
49
Yes = 38 %
No = 11 %
In
Development
= 51 %
50
50 – 70% of Companies Have One
Social Media Spending on the Upswing
51
Time Spent on Email vs Social Networks
52
Action Item: Join the Conversation
53
 Social/collaborative networks in education are a fast
growing phenomenon
 Althoug...
Build, Host, and Facilitate
Professional Learning Communities for Educators
55
How to Use Facebook for Business
http://www.hubspot.com/archive/facebook-for-business
56
LinkedIn Groups: Guide to Creating Successful Communities
http://www.slideshare.net/kkochaver/linkedin-groups-guide
57
An Educator’s Guide to Ning
http://teachingwithoutwalls.com/resources.php
58
www.weareteachers.com
59
edWeb User’s Guide to Creating Professional Learning Communities
http://www.edweb.net/fimages/op/edWebUsersGuide.pdf
Ask not what your
customers can do for you…
60
 Provide valuable information
 Host discussions on important topics
 Giv...
The benefits will come…
61
 Gain valuable feedback and market insights
 Increase customer loyalty and retention
 Find c...
Like a 24/7 Conference
62
Stimulating panels/discussions
Informative presentations
Personal connections
Relationship b...
Strategies for Success
63
 Experiment to find what works for your organization.
 Stop thinking about campaigns and ROI. ...
Q and A
64
A link to the recording of this webinar will be
sent to you via email.
You can download a copy of the PowerPoin...
65
Research Reports
Download the research at
www.edweb.net or
www.mmseducation.com
Social Media and Young Adults Pew Inter...
66
National Education Technology Plan 2010
Download at:
http://www.ed.gov/technology/netp-2010
Resources
67
How to Use Facebook for Business
http://www.hubspot.com/archive/facebook-for-business
LinkedIn Groups: Guide ...
68
Lisa Schmucki, Founder & CEO
lisa@edweb.net
800-575-6015, ext. 100
www.edweb.net
www.twitter.com/edwebnet
A professiona...
69
Susan Meell, CEO
smeell@mmseducation.com
About MMS Education
MMS Education is a national market research,
consulting an...
70
Interactive Educational Systems Design (IESD), Inc.
provides a variety of services related to research on
education tec...
71
About MCH Strategic Data
MCH Strategic Data is a leading source
of compiled data on education, health,
and government i...
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Social Networking and Education

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  • We’re going to talk to you today about research we have done on educators and social networkingPresenters:My name is Lisa Schmucki and I’m the founder and CEO of edWeb.net – a professional social network for the education community.Susan KeipperMeell is the CEO of MMS Education, a national market research, consulting and marketing company specializing exclusively in the education market. Ellen Bialo is the President of IESD and Jay Sivin-Kachala is the Vice President of IESD - IESD provides services related to research on education technology issues and the evaluation and development of educational software, multimedia products, and website.
  • 92% of those who registered for this webinar have joined a social network.
  • Mention that 92% of registrants have joined a social network.Point out LinkedIn
  • Let’s review the results of the research.Then we’ll talk more about how companies can use social networks to connect with customers, prospects, and the education community at large – in a way that supports all of the customer-facing activities of the company.
  • JSK: Sub-bullets for first 2 bullets seems like too much detail. Hard to process all of this. Suggest deleting sub-bullets.Suggest deleting the last 2 bullets. Can talk through the possibility of with-email bias, but this likely to be slight in 2010.Specifics of inventive not important.
  • Suggest deleting the sentence: “Social networks are growing rapidly in popularity.”
  • JSK: I split the Phase I Summary between 2 slides, condensed and use design elements for any easier read.
  • JSK: I split the Phase I Summary between 2 slides, condensed and use design elements for any easier read.
  • Budgets shifting from traditional media to interactive mediaCustomers expect a more interactive, personal experienceMarketing is becoming a strategic leader within organizationsSocial media is the channel expected to see the highest increase in effectiveness inthe next 3 yearsIdentify opportunities, especially for education companies
  • Join networks on Ning
  • Quality tech, quality, membership, quality content
  • The costs of traditional media are constantly on the rise
  • You’re not behind – yet! But have you read Outliers?
  • Let’s review the results of the research, then we’ll give you some ideas and action steps to help you build a successful social media strategy
  • Social Networking and Education

    1. 1. Co-sponsored by © 2010 edWeb.net, IESD, MCH Strategic Data, MMS Education Social Networking in Education: Practices, Policies, and Realities in 2010
    2. 2. 2 Lisa Schmucki Founder/CEO edWeb.net Susan Keipper Meell CEO MMS Education Dr. Jay Sivin-Kachala Vice President Interactive Systems Design IESD Ellen Bialo President Interactive Systems Design IESD Webinar Presenters and Industry Experts
    3. 3. Social Networking and Education  Which educators are the most likely to participate in social networking, which are the least?  What are the biggest obstacles or challenges for integrating social networking into education?  Do educators who have joined social networks see a greater or lesser value for education?  How can companies use social networks to improve all aspects of their customer-facing activities? 3
    4. 4. The Social Networking Revolution
    5. 5. Teens and Adults on Social Networks 5
    6. 6. The Most Popular Sites 6
    7. 7. Social Networks Are Ideal for Creating Professional Learning Communities
    8. 8. Research, Policy, and Funding Drivers 8
    9. 9. 9 Social networks can be used to provide educators with career-long personal learning tools and resources that make professional learning timely and relevant as well as an ongoing activity that continually improves practice and evolves their skills over time. Online communities should enable educators to take online courses, tap into experts and best practices for just-in-time problem solving, and provide platforms and tools for educators to design and develop resources with and for their colleagues. National Education Technology Plan Released November 2010
    10. 10. 10 A Collaborative Research Effort
    11. 11. Phase I – Quantitative Study Goals To benchmark attitudes, perceptions and utilization of social networking websites and content-sharing tools by teachers, principals and school librarians. 11 Susan Meell MMS Education
    12. 12. 12 Phase I Methodology • Deployed by MMS Education to 82,900 educators; emails provided by MCH • Online survey conducted blind • 1.55% response rate (1,284 total responses) • 601 Teachers - 1.29% response • 381 Principals - 1.49% response • 262 Librarians - 2.45 % response • Margin of error +/2.71% at the 95% confidence level • Some inherent bias since study conducted only with educators with email addresses • Incentive included entry in a drawing for a netbook computer
    13. 13. 13 61% of educators surveyed already belong to one or more SN websites Question: Social networks are growing rapidly in popularity. Are you currently a member of or have you ever joined a social networking website like Facebook, MySpace, Ning, LinkedIn or one of the social networking websites created for educators (e.g., We Are Teachers, edWeb.net, etc.)? 61% 62% 54% 70% 39% 38% 46% 30% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% All Teachers Principals Librarians Yes No
    14. 14. 14 Age matters – direct correlation between age and membership in social networks 78% 65% 47% 22% 35% 53% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 18-34 35-54 55+ Non Members Members As expected, younger educators are more likely to be members than older educators, but 47% of older educators have joined a social network. Age
    15. 15. 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 2% 5% 11% 14% 20% 85% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% We the Teachers Teachade Tapped In Learn Central We Are Teachers Ning in Education edWeb.net Classroom 2.0 Ning LinkedIn MySpace Facebook 15 Facebook has highest membership; education sites still in early growth stage Question: Please indicate if you are a member of any of these sites.
    16. 16. 1% 2% 2% 2% 3% 4% 5% 12% 13% 16% 76% 78% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Tapped In We the Teachers Teachade Ning in Education We Are Teachers Ning Learn Central LinkedIn Classroom 2.0 edWeb.net MySpace Facebook 16 Educators who are not members are still familiar with social networks Question: Please indicate if you are familiar with any of these sites. Note: respondents may have received previous email promotions about edWeb.net which may influence response
    17. 17. 2% 4% 9% 21% 13% 77% 4% 8% 16% 17% 18% 81% 1% 4% 9% 9% 25% 91% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% edWeb.net Classroom 2.0 Ning LinkedIn MySpace Facebook Teachers Librarians Principals 17 Social networking sites have different appeal for principals, teachers and librarians Analysis of membership by job function: teacher, librarian, principal.
    18. 18. 85% 72% 47% 18% 5% 2% 6% 2% 30% 15% 8% 1% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% To connect with friends To connect with family members To connect with professional peers and colleagues To stay current with the latest Web 2.0 technology To make connections for job and career opportunities To generate or try to generate income 18 Educators use different types of social networking sites for different purposes Question: Please tell us how you are using general social networking sites vs. professional/education sites (e.g. LinkedIn, Ning in Education, We Are Teachers, edWeb.net, etc.). General Professional/ Educational
    19. 19. 19 Looking ahead, educators are more likely to join a social networking site dedicated to education Question: How likely are you to join a new or additional social networking site in the next 12 months? 16% 5% 23% 10% 34% 21% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Alreadya member Nota member GeneralSite ProfessionalSite EducationSite
    20. 20. 20 Educators see value for using social networking in many areas of education
    21. 21. 21 Educators who have joined a social network are more positive than those who have not 35% 29% 31% 27% 39% 40% 38% 41% 40% 39% 44% 42% 45% 44% 29% 33% 37% 40% 43% 44% 46% 50% 51% 53% 56% 60% 61% 64% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% To find job and career opportunities. To find information on products and services. To connect with the local community to get local support. To become familiar with social networking. To connect with students To connect with parents To get support from peers to cope with job challenges. To receive online professional development support. To learn how social networking and Web 2.0 applications can be incorporated into teaching. To create groups to collaborate on projects. To improve school-wide communications with staff, students and parents. To connect with professional peers and colleagues. To create professional learning communities. To share information and resources with educators. Members Non-Members Perceived value of social networking: those who are a member of an SNS vs. those who are not.
    22. 22. Top Four Reasons Educators See Value in Use of Social Networking in Education 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Improve schoolwide communications Create professional learning communities Connect with professional peers and colleagues Share information and resources with educators 53% 56% 49% 51% 50% 61% 61% 65% 50% 50% 51% 54% Teachers Librarians Principals 22
    23. 23. Least Popular Reasons for Using Social Networking in Education 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Find job and career opportunities Find information on products and services 30% 30% 33% 28% 32% 33% Teachers Librarians Principals 23
    24. 24. 24 Concerns include privacy, lack of time, email overload and restricted access. Question: Please indicate the concerns you may have about joining a general social networking site vs. a professional/education social networking site . 9% 9% 11% 9% 33% 47% 48% 50% 11% 11% 12% 12% 47% 47% 48% 64% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% My teachers union advises against it. My teachers association advises against it. I do not see the value for me personally. I do not see the value for me professionally. My school/district does not allow me to access these sites. I already get too many emails and online communications. I am already too busy and don’t have time. I am concerned about my personal privacy. General Sites Prof/Ed Sites
    25. 25. Phase I - Key Findings • Educators see that social networking sites can have value in education: - As a way for educators to share information and resources - To create professional learning communities - To improve school-wide communications with parents, students and staff. • Educators who have used social networking technology are more positive about the benefits than those who have not. • Regardless of prior experience with networking sites, educators expressed a strong preference, going forward, for joining a social networking site dedicated to education. 25
    26. 26. Phase I - Key Findings • Teachers and librarians are looking to principals and school leaders to provide: - Policies and guidance re: use of social networking professionally and/or in the classroom - Training in using social networking professionally and/or in the classroom • At the same time, principals feel the most behind in using the technology. They have the least personal experience using these tools. 26
    27. 27. Action Plans and Recommendations • Listen Before you Speak • Join social networking groups related to your program or product. Observe and follow, listen, watch trends, topics that spark interaction • Content is King but Content is Not About Your Product • Identify issues, topics of interest to your customers • Look for educator experts to join your group • Keep it fun, engaging, lively, humorous, interactive • Make it an experience, have a voice • Controlling the Conversation is Not an Option! 27
    28. 28. • Begin using Social Networking with Customers • Using social networking for new customer acquisition is most difficult • Use SN after-sale to build retention, customer loyalty • Identify Measurable Goals (ties to ROI) • Enrollment, engagement, registrations, mini-grants • Not all people will create content or respond – many are readers/information gatherers. Forrester research indicates 1% want to create content 9% want to share content 90% want to read/use content 28 Action Plans and Recommendations
    29. 29. • Build for Separate Audiences (if it makes sense) • Parents, educators, students • Social Networking is 24/7 • You may need to change your regular staffing needs • Weekends, evenings • Not all conversations can be done online, you may need help desk/phone support 29 Action Plans and Recommendations
    30. 30. 30 Goals of Phase II • Conduct an in-depth discussion with principals who have used social networking in their professional lives • Explore their experiences and attitudes about using this technology personally and in education • Find experiences and practices that provide lessons for other principals on how social networking can be used effectively
    31. 31. 31 Phase II Methodology • Conducted by Interactive Educational Systems Design (IESD) late February through early March 2010, using IESD’s EDRoom online research facility • 12 principals participated, recruited by edWeb and MMS Education • Participants were screened to have used social networking for professional purposes and to be actively engaged in at least one social networking site • Representation from elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools
    32. 32. 32 Phase II Question Focuses • Personal experience with social networking and the use of social networking in education • Interest and comfort level of educators and students in using social networking for educational purposes • Uses of social networking in their local schools and/or districts
    33. 33. 33 Phase II Question Focuses • School/district policies related to social networking • Principals’ views of their role in supporting the adoption of social networking and other collaborative technologies by their teachers and staff • Looking into the future, how principals see social networking and online collaboration tools changing the education experience for teachers, students, and the entire school community
    34. 34. 34 Phase II Key Findings Advantages to student use of social networking About half of the principals described potential educational value that could be derived from student use of social networking. Looking to the future―most of the principals thought social networking and online collaboration tools would make a substantive change in students’ educational experience.
    35. 35. 35 Phase II Key Findings Interest and comfort level of students with social networking in education About half of the principals gave a general characterization of their students as very engaged and/or interested in social networking. About half of the respondents mentioned a high level of involvement with social networking on the part of a substantial group of students, but not all of them.
    36. 36. 36 Phase II Key Findings Advantages to educator use of social networking About half of the principals described the value of social networking as a tool for sharing information, ideas, and experiences with other educators.
    37. 37. 37 Phase II Key Findings Interest and comfort level of educators with social networking in education Colleagues. Most of the principals described some degree of use, interest, and/or comfort level among their colleagues re: adopting social networking in education. Teachers. About half of the principals indicated that some of their teachers are integrating social networking or other Web 2.0 technologies with instruction or would be comfortable doing so. Library media specialists. About half of the principals described a relatively high level of interest or comfort with social networking among their library media specialists.
    38. 38. 38 Phase II Key Findings Interest and comfort level of educators with social networking in education Age of the educator. About half of the respondents indicated that the younger the educator, the more likely he or she was to be comfortable with social networking.
    39. 39. 39 Phase II Key Findings School/district policies related to social networking About half of the principals indicated that they felt their current policies were inadequate and/or needed revision. Several principals indicated that they had no written policy dealing specifically with social networking. Most of the principals indicated that students did not have access to social networks at school.
    40. 40. 40 Phase II Key Findings Use of social networking and Web 2.0 in local schools and districts Most of the principals reported some use of Web 2.0 technologies with students in their school or district― but social networking per se is mostly blocked for students.
    41. 41. 41 Phase II Key Findings Issue: Teacher-student social contact Teacher-student social contact via social networking (e.g., Facebook “friending”) could create potential problems and/or should be avoided. (Mentioned by most of the principals)
    42. 42. 42 Phase II Key Findings Issue: Need for educational focus Use of social networking in schools by both educators and students should be focused on educational purposes. (Mentioned by about half of the principals )
    43. 43. 43 Phase II Key Findings Issue: Legal concerns Legal concerns are one of the factors to be considered in implementing social networking in schools. (Mentioned by about half of the principals)
    44. 44. 44 Phase II Key Findings Issue: Lack of time Lack of time is one of the barriers to implementation of social networking in schools. (Mentioned by about half of the principals)
    45. 45. 45 Join and explore existing education-focused social media websites: edWeb.net WeAreTeachers We the Teachers Classroom 2.0 Ning in Education LearnCentral Tapped in ASCD Edge Microsoft’s Partners in Learning Network TeachAde (NEA) Action Plans and Recommendations
    46. 46. 46 Visit and explore websites focused on student collaboration projects: ThinkQuest World Portal GlobalSchoolNet ePals iEARN Collaboration Centre OzProjects.edu.au Action Plans and Recommendations
    47. 47. 47 Identify educators and instructional designers that have experience in developing collaborative Web 2.0 projects. Consider hiring them as consultants/advisors. Action Plans and Recommendations
    48. 48. 48 When developing social media experiences for educators or students: • Start with education-focused goals and objectives, and work backwards • Provide clear, explicit guidance to participants • Engage the right project leader • Consider “seeding” the project with exemplary participants • Start with a small pilot • Ensure that the technology interface is simple Action Plans and Recommendations
    49. 49. Do you have a social media strategy? 49 Yes = 38 % No = 11 % In Development = 51 %
    50. 50. 50 50 – 70% of Companies Have One
    51. 51. Social Media Spending on the Upswing 51
    52. 52. Time Spent on Email vs Social Networks 52
    53. 53. Action Item: Join the Conversation 53  Social/collaborative networks in education are a fast growing phenomenon  Although there are significant barriers to using this technology with students – educators are getting on board on an professional level  Social networks support collaboration and professional development  There are powerful drivers pushing this  Social networks give companies an unprecedented opportunity to create deeper, ongoing relationships with all members of the education community
    54. 54. Build, Host, and Facilitate Professional Learning Communities for Educators
    55. 55. 55 How to Use Facebook for Business http://www.hubspot.com/archive/facebook-for-business
    56. 56. 56 LinkedIn Groups: Guide to Creating Successful Communities http://www.slideshare.net/kkochaver/linkedin-groups-guide
    57. 57. 57 An Educator’s Guide to Ning http://teachingwithoutwalls.com/resources.php
    58. 58. 58 www.weareteachers.com
    59. 59. 59 edWeb User’s Guide to Creating Professional Learning Communities http://www.edweb.net/fimages/op/edWebUsersGuide.pdf
    60. 60. Ask not what your customers can do for you… 60  Provide valuable information  Host discussions on important topics  Give educators a place where they can talk with and support each other  Provide professional development and training  Ask for opinions and input  Provide more personal product support  Offer opportunities, contests, grants
    61. 61. The benefits will come… 61  Gain valuable feedback and market insights  Increase customer loyalty and retention  Find customer champions and advisors  Get ideas for product development  Increase the recognition of your brand  Be recognized as a thought leader and expert  Generate, nurture, and convert leads
    62. 62. Like a 24/7 Conference 62 Stimulating panels/discussions Informative presentations Personal connections Relationship building Word-of-mouth marketing Showcase for products/services
    63. 63. Strategies for Success 63  Experiment to find what works for your organization.  Stop thinking about campaigns and ROI. Think community.  Sponsor professional learning communities for educators  Pick a platform that’s right for your market/needs.  Leverage your existing assets: e-newsletters, research, experts/authors, webinars.  Leverage your whole team and tap young people on your staff.  Get started now.
    64. 64. Q and A 64 A link to the recording of this webinar will be sent to you via email. You can download a copy of the PowerPoint at: www.mmseducation.com For more information, contact info@edweb.net
    65. 65. 65 Research Reports Download the research at www.edweb.net or www.mmseducation.com Social Media and Young Adults Pew Internet and American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx
    66. 66. 66 National Education Technology Plan 2010 Download at: http://www.ed.gov/technology/netp-2010
    67. 67. Resources 67 How to Use Facebook for Business http://www.hubspot.com/archive/facebook-for-business LinkedIn Groups: Guide to Creating Successful Communities http://www.slideshare.net/kkochaver/linkedin-groups-guide An Educator’s Guide to Ning http://teachingwithoutwalls.com/resources.php edWeb User’s Guide to Creating Professional Learning Communities http://www.edweb.net/fimages/op/edWebUsersGuide.pdf The Best of Both Worlds: How to Effectively Leverage Social Media Relationships with Real-Time Collaboration Tools http://www.scribd.com/doc/21722909/Go-to-Meeting-Bunzel- SocialMediaWebinars-eBook-0
    68. 68. 68 Lisa Schmucki, Founder & CEO lisa@edweb.net 800-575-6015, ext. 100 www.edweb.net www.twitter.com/edwebnet A professional social networking website for the education community About edWeb.net
    69. 69. 69 Susan Meell, CEO smeell@mmseducation.com About MMS Education MMS Education is a national market research, consulting and marketing company specializing exclusively in the education market. MMS is helping its clients understand how social networking and social media provides enhanced opportunities for educators to collaborate peer to peer, and provides a way for organizations to connect more directly with the educators who use their products and services in classrooms every day. Please contact us to discuss how we can help you with: • Strategic Planning • Market Research • Marketing/Communications/Social Media • Inside Sales and Sales Support • Knowledge Management/Database 800-523-5948 www.mmseducation.com
    70. 70. 70 Interactive Educational Systems Design (IESD), Inc. provides a variety of services related to research on education technology issues and the evaluation and development of educational software, multimedia products, and websites. IESD was founded in 1984 by Ellen Bialo and Dr. Jay Sivin-Kachala, the firm’s President and Vice President. IESD’s clients include education market publishers, technology hardware manufacturers, government agencies, nonprofit institutions, and school districts. IESD designs and implements qualitative and quantitative research— including focus group research (in person and online), structured interviews, survey research, user testing, demographic and financial data analysis, literature reviews, and text document summary and analysis. IESD also custom designs and implements evaluation research on educational programs, products, and services. For more information, call 212.769.1715 or email iesdinc@aol.com. About IESD
    71. 71. 71 About MCH Strategic Data MCH Strategic Data is a leading source of compiled data on education, health, and government institutions in the United States, and has recently acquired the fully-updated QED education database. MCH is a privately owned company that has been in the education market for over 80 years. MCH is a strategic partner of edWeb.net. John Hood, President johnh@mchdata.com 800-776-6373

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