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Nyc parks marine debris removal

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Nate Grove of NYC Parks describes the protocol he has established for removing abandoned marine vessels from NYC Waters

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Nyc parks marine debris removal

  1. 1. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal
  2. 2. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal Derelict Abandoned Vessels and Marine Debris is an issue throughout NYC Waters • NYC has over 520 miles of shoreline, more than Boston, Miami, Los Angeles and San Francisco combined • More than 30% of that shoreline, 160 miles, is NYC Parkland • There are hundreds of abandoned vessels littering NYC waterways and shorelines • Vessels tend to be the last thing individuals purchase in good times and the first thing they get rid of in bad times • When a vessel is no longer running, particularly if it has an inboard engine, the cost of disposal may be higher than the actual value of the vessel • Unlike vehicles that have metal scrap value, vessel fiberglass requires costly landfill disposal • Vessel fluids, tanks and engines must be drained and removed prior to disposal
  3. 3. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal Federal and Local Agencies are involved in addressing the issue of Marine Debris • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is the lead government agency, addressing floatables that pose a hazard to the federally-maintained navigation channels • U.S. Coast Guard, via superfund contracting, addresses leaking fuels and oils; USCG does not remove nor dispose of vessels • Removal of derelict vessels and debris located outside of the federal channels is, ultimately, the responsibility of the property owner • NYPD Harbor and FDNY Marine Unit respond to on-water emergencies and security threats • DSNY assists with derelict vessels and debris that are reachable by land • The City does not possess the in-house fleet and equipment necessary to perform on-water removals
  4. 4. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal NYC Parks and DCAS developed a Citywide Marine Debris Removal Contract • NYC Parks, as the largest steward of shoreline, including marinas located throughout the five boroughs, drafted a derelict vessel and marine debris removal contract • Working with DCAS, this multi-year requirements contract was implemented in 2015 • Twelve vendors bid on the contract and it was awarded to lowest responsible bidder • NYC’s first-ever standing contract enabling any City agency to address derelict vessel and marine debris items as they arise • Pre-set agreed upon pricing for removal of derelict vessels, marine, vegetative, and construction and demolition debris from shorelines and waterways • “Where-and-when” contract that saves time and cost, avoiding need to bid each job separately • Project cost is known prior to contacting vendor
  5. 5. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal Environmental Permitting and Compliance • Most derelict vessels and debris end up on natural shorelines and in tidal wetlands, requiring pre-removal permitting by NYS DEC and careful adherence to environmental best practices and in-water seasonal work moratoriums • Worked with NYS DEC in attaining renewable borough-wide debris removal permit • Coordinate with NYC Parks Natural Resources Group for site identification, as well as for removal monitoring and vendor adherence to best practices • Jamaica Bay Ecowatchers, American Littoral Society, and other local groups and advocates are critical partners in identifying and prioritizing needs
  6. 6. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal Work Performed • Over 300 vessels and 5,000 cubic yards of marine debris have been removed citywide via current contract in the past 5 years • Nearly 50% of the contracted work has been funded by FEMA and NOAA grants • NYC Parks was the single largest recipient of a NOAA-administered competitive grant to address Hurricane Sandy-related debris, receiving $1.6 million of the $2.3 million total available funding • DEP completed an expansive Environmental Benefit Project in 2019:  Eight months and nearly $800,000  Removals in Howard Beach, Broad Channel, Bergen Basin, Hendrix Creek, Old Mill Creek, Canarsie Pier, Vernam Basin, Jamaica Bay Islands, Mill Basin, Floyd Bennet Field, Shell Bank Creek, Coney Island Creek  145 “substantial” objects were removed, including 125 vessels, 815 cubic yards of debris, and a 30,000 pound buoy
  7. 7. NYC Parks Marine Debris Removal Funding and Future Programs • Funding has been located via Federal grants, mandated environmental consent orders, as well as discretionary municipal capital and expense dollars • There presently is no dedicated reoccurring funding to address existing and new needs as they arise • Discussing with NYS DEC ability to use removals as mechanism to meet in-water project mitigation requirements • Many states maintain a tax on vessel registrations which provides reoccurring funding for enforcement and removals • Many states require vessel insurance, which reduces the number of abandonments; NYC Parks implemented this policy at all marinas located on Parkland • Publicly available vessel turn-in program could be implemented with funding
  8. 8. Thank you. Questions?

Nate Grove of NYC Parks describes the protocol he has established for removing abandoned marine vessels from NYC Waters

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