Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

NYC Dep oyster reef update regarding head of bay oyster project

15 views

Published on

NYC DEP oyster reef in Jamaica Bay--update

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

NYC Dep oyster reef update regarding head of bay oyster project

  1. 1. DEP Oyster Research and Restoration Project Head of Bay, Jamaica Bay Fall 2018 Update David T. Lin, Ph.D. Ecological Project Manager and Marine Ecologist Office of Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure and Research Jamaica Bay Task Force Meeting November 1, 2018
  2. 2. 2 Jamaica Bay Oyster Restoration Project
  3. 3. 3 Why Oysters? Ecosystem services  Coastal storm protection  Erosion control  Water quality improvement  Habitat generation
  4. 4. 4 Background  DEP is committed to researching innovative coastal restoration practices in New York City’s waters  Building on DEP’s oyster pilot study in 2010 at Gerritsen Creek and Dubos Point, Jamaica Bay  DEP received a $1 million grant from the US Dept. of Interior/NFWF Hurricane Sandy Coastal Resiliency Grant Program and contributed $375,000 for an oyster recruitment study in Jamaica Bay
  5. 5. 5 DEP Oyster Project Locations Oysters Early Oyster Projects Oyster Project Scale- up under DOI Grant
  6. 6. 6 Project Goals Evaluate the factors affecting native oyster growth, survival and reproduction in Jamaica Bay Assess ecosystem services from oyster restoration: • water quality benefits • habitat use Understanding oyster recruitment in Jamaica Bay is key to the ultimate goal of establishing a self-sustaining population
  7. 7. 7 Approach
  8. 8. 8 Approach
  9. 9. 9 Larval “Donor” System • Donor “nursery” releasing oyster larvae into water column • 650-foot-long string of floating cages • Stocked with 35,200 adult oysters in Sept 2016 + 9,300 adult oysters added in Nov 2017 • Current adult population estimated at 29,000 adult oysters • To date there has been minor damage from winter storms • For greater stability all lines connecting cages upgraded to heavier gauge
  10. 10. 10 Donor System Installation: Sept 2016
  11. 11. 11 “Receiver” Reef Beds 0.33 M 47 CY Clam Shell62 CY Porcelain 110 CY Clam Shell 47 CY Clam Shell Reef # 1A Reef # 1B 50 M 25 CY Oyster Shell 110 CY Clam Shell 84 CY Clam Shell Reef # 2A Reef # 2B 0.33 M 25 CY Oyster Shell 110 CY Clam Shell 84 CY Clam Shell Reef # 3A Reef # 3B 62 CY Porcelain 110 CY Clam Shell 47 CY Clam Shell Reef # 4A Reef # 4B 0.33 M 0.33 M  Four constructed mounds of clam shell, oyster shell and recycled porcelain  Each 50 m x 10 m x <1 m  About 0.5 acres (0.2 hectares) in total area  Preliminary diver surveys in early July 2017 showed that the receiver reef beds remained intact over the winter season and had very low macroalgal cover  Final diver surveys conducted in Sept 2018  Verified and monitored by multibeam bathymetry
  12. 12. 12 Receiver Reef Bed Installation: Oct 2016
  13. 13. 13 Receiver Reef Bed Installation: Oct 2016
  14. 14. 14 Donor System Maintenance • Maintenance and Monitoring: approximately 3 visits per month • Inspecting for signs of damage or tampering • Repairs as needed; typically draining pontoon floats and redistributing oyster bags to new trays • Replaced original line with heavier gauge in July 2017
  15. 15. 15 Donor System Monitoring • Monthly monitoring: mortality, growth, and gonad development or “ripeness” • Biannual monitoring: oyster condition index and sex ratios @ Stony Brook University Marine Animal Disease Laboratory • Annual monitoring: oyster disease testing @ Stony Brook University Marine Animal Disease Laboratory
  16. 16. 16 Donor System Monitoring • Rapid growth observed • Size: mean shell height 128 mm • Mortality: 14.25% among adult oysters to date (Sept 2016 to Oct 2018) • Oyster diseases: common local oyster disease Dermo detected at 10-20% prevalence, but at low infection severity
  17. 17. 17 Oyster Spat Monitoring • ”Spat” = newly-settled oyster larvae • 20 total spat collector stations throughout eastern Jamaica Bay • Monitored monthly • No oyster spat detected to date
  18. 18. 18 Oyster Spat Monitoring Jingle shell (Anomia simplex) Atlantic oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea)
  19. 19. 19 Plankton Tow Surveys • Density and distribution of oyster larvae near Head of Bay project site • Completed in summer 2018; awaiting results
  20. 20. 20 Reefs as Functional Habitat • Diver surveys • Benthic trays o Oyster spat o Investigate habitat use of constructed oyster reefs by marine fish and invertebrates o Plastic trays filled with cultch (clam shell, oyster shell or porcelain) and placed on top of corresponding material on receiver reef o Installed August 2017 + diver inspection October 2017 o Retrieval completed September 2018; pending analysis and reporting
  21. 21. 21 Thank You

×