Monday<br />
I.   What do you think is the most important function of families / family members?II.  What family function do you think ...
Apples<br />A basket contains 5 apples. Do you know how to divide them among 5 kids so that each one has an apple and one ...
Families Through History<br />Continued<br />
Pre-Industrial Families<br />Early technologies gave the possibility of other kinds of work…<br />Crafts and Trades – usef...
The Roles We Played<br />Just like in hunter-gatherers, agricultural and pre-industrial family roles were defined by,<br /...
The Pre-Industrial VillageFamilies With “Gravity”<br />Like today, there were still agricultural families<br />the richest...
Urban Industrial Families<br />More technology!  More changes…<br />Factories opened, needed MANY workers<br />Men, adoles...
Not for families!!  All family work is important!
If any work does not get done… there will be trouble for the family</li></li></ul><li>The Industrial, Post-Industrial City...
The Consumer Family<br />The 1900’s changed the common family in urban areas to follow a consumer culture<br />families we...
Family-Related Laws in Canada<br />Laws<br />rules stating what behaviour is okay and what is not okay for a certain socie...
Family-Related Laws in Canada<br />Married Woman’s Property Law<br />created in 1870, allowed women to keep their last nam...
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April 26 families through history (continued)

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April 26 families through history (continued)

  1. 1. Monday<br />
  2. 2. I. What do you think is the most important function of families / family members?II. What family function do you think government feels is the most important?<br />
  3. 3. Apples<br />A basket contains 5 apples. Do you know how to divide them among 5 kids so that each one has an apple and one apple stays in the basket? <br />
  4. 4. Families Through History<br />Continued<br />
  5. 5. Pre-Industrial Families<br />Early technologies gave the possibility of other kinds of work…<br />Crafts and Trades – useful and productive skills<br />Pottery, Woodworking, Cooking, Fishing, Clothes-making, Metalworking, Building, etc.<br />The traditional craftsman’s family was smaller than an agricultural family<br />the “family business” needed less workers – so, the family had less children<br />
  6. 6. The Roles We Played<br />Just like in hunter-gatherers, agricultural and pre-industrial family roles were defined by,<br />the sex and age of the family members<br />the work the family did<br />Men farmed or crafted<br />Women cared for the children, the home<br />Children helped with the work as soon as they were able<br />
  7. 7. The Pre-Industrial VillageFamilies With “Gravity”<br />Like today, there were still agricultural families<br />the richest people were the land-owners<br />but more and more craftsman families were being formed<br />It became “easier” to have many different craftsmen living close to eachother<br />crafting needed less land than agriculture<br />less travelling time to get the services you needed<br />In this way, the first villages and towns were created<br />
  8. 8. Urban Industrial Families<br />More technology! More changes…<br />Factories opened, needed MANY workers<br />Men, adolescent boys, and unmarried girls worked in the factory “paid work”<br />Mothers stayed home and performed housework or “unpaid work”<br /><ul><li>An important note: “unpaid work” is often looked at as less important than “paid work”, but is this true?
  9. 9. Not for families!! All family work is important!
  10. 10. If any work does not get done… there will be trouble for the family</li></li></ul><li>The Industrial, Post-Industrial CityFamilies With MORE “Gravity”<br />Factories and large companies provided a way for many, many families to “make a living” (industrial)<br />workers moved closer to the factories to get to work easier (residential)<br />modern craftsmen and tradesmen followed (commercial)<br />the large amount of industrial, residential, and commercial areas close together is what defined the modern “city”<br />
  11. 11. The Consumer Family<br />The 1900’s changed the common family in urban areas to follow a consumer culture<br />families were the reason why many people spent money buying and using “stuff”<br />food, clothes, toys, technology, houses, furniture, etc.<br />“consumerism” is a negative idea today, and more and more people are trying to “buy less”<br />What are some ways YOU can buy less in YOUR family?<br />
  12. 12. Family-Related Laws in Canada<br />Laws<br />rules stating what behaviour is okay and what is not okay for a certain society, or area<br />Age of Majority<br />the age where a person can marry, not needing agreement from their parents<br />18 in Canada<br />WITH agreement from parents, teenagers as young as 16 may get married<br />
  13. 13. Family-Related Laws in Canada<br />Married Woman’s Property Law<br />created in 1870, allowed women to keep their last names<br />Divorce Law<br />before WWII<br />extremely uncommon<br />allowed only in cases of proven adultery (cheating)<br />1968 and after<br />law changed to accept divorce for “irreconcilable differences”<br />couples can divorce if they can’t agree on important issue(s)<br />
  14. 14. Hotel Bill<br />Three people check into a hotel. They pay $30 to the manager and go to their room. The manager finds out that the room rate is $25 and gives the bellboy $5 to return to the guests. On the way to the room the bellboy reasons that $5 would be difficult to split among three people so he pockets $2 and gives $1 to each person. Now each person paid $10 and got back $1. So they paid $9 each, totaling $27. The bellboy has another $2, adding up to $29.Where is the remaining dollar? <br />

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