Prohibition

4,148 views

Published on

8th grade level rundown of suffragist & prohibition movements

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,148
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
608
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
131
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Prohibition

  1. 1. Women’s Suffrage & Temperance
  2. 2. Seneca Falls Convention 1848 <ul><li>Leaders : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Elizabeth Cady Stanton </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Susan B. Anthony </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lucretia Mott </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Seneca Falls Declaration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Modeled on Declaration of Independence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demanded equal rights for women, including suffrage (voting rights) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Opposition to Women Voting
  4. 5. Why were people opposed to women’s suffrage?
  5. 7. Protest! <ul><li>New leaders of the Suffragist movement </li></ul><ul><li>◊ Carrie Chapman Catt organized state by state fight for suffrage </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>◊ Alice Paul & Rose Winslow lead constant protests of Wilson’s Whitehouse </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Many protesters arrested </li></ul><ul><li>Protesters & organizers were successful </li></ul>
  6. 8. The 19 th Amendment
  7. 9. New Opportunities for Women <ul><li>The 19 th Amendment was ratified in 1920, giving women the right to vote 130 years after the Constitution was ratified </li></ul><ul><li>This gave women many more social and political opportunities </li></ul>
  8. 10. New Opportunities <ul><li>1) Higher Education: More and more women began attending universities and graduate schools </li></ul><ul><li>2) Women’s clubs were formed to help improve local communities; raising $ for parks, libraries, schools, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Women became vocal reformers (Florence Kelly – sweatshops & child labor) </li></ul>
  9. 11. The 18 th Amendment: Prohibition
  10. 12. Reasons for Prohibition <ul><li>Damage to family </li></ul><ul><li>Economic cost (unemployment) </li></ul><ul><li>Religious reasons </li></ul><ul><li>Machine politics (deals were made in saloons) </li></ul><ul><li>WWI: use grain to feed troops </li></ul><ul><li>Anti-German sentiment </li></ul><ul><li>Women </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WCTU (Frances Willard) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carrie Nation </li></ul></ul>Supporters <ul><li>Rural People </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Southern & Westerners concerned with “out of control” Northern cities </li></ul></ul>
  11. 13. Women’s Christian Temperance Union <ul><li>Goal: Outlaw alcohol </li></ul><ul><li>Methods: Community organizing, protests </li></ul>
  12. 14. Carry Nation <ul><li>Husband died from heavy drinking </li></ul><ul><li>Religious Fanatic </li></ul><ul><li>Went into bars/saloons broke kegs & bottles with hatchet </li></ul>
  13. 15. 18 th Amendment passed in 1917
  14. 16. 18 th Amendment a total failure <ul><li>People continued drinking in “speakeasies” (illegal bars & saloons) </li></ul><ul><li>Organized crime supplied liquor </li></ul><ul><li>People attempted to make their own liquor (bathtub gin) and were blinded or poisoned </li></ul><ul><li>Many people who were supposed to enforce the law became hypocrites </li></ul>
  15. 17. Organized Crime <ul><li>Mobsters such as Al Capone in Chicago made lots of money supplying alcohol. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This money gave them more power to hire goons and corrupt politicians </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobsters would gun competing mobsters down in the street, blow up buildings and speakeasies, kidnap and murder innocent people, all to gain power. </li></ul></ul>
  16. 19. Valentine’s Day Massacre
  17. 21. Prohibition Repealed in 1932
  18. 22. Lessons of Prohibition <ul><li>Good idea? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why or why not? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Is there still prohibition? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it a good idea? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why or why not? </li></ul></ul>

×