Instructional Online Gaming by E B bauman 2011

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This presentation was made at the Year Five WI TECNE Conference: eLearning in Nursing: Design, Innovation,Delivery and Evaluation. The presentation discussed online game-based learning for nursing instruction and was presented by Eric B. Bauman, PhD, RN.

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Instructional Online Gaming by E B bauman 2011

  1. 1. Instruc(onal  Online  Gaming   WI  TECNE:  E-­‐Learning  in  Nursing:     Design,  Innova7on,  Delivery  and  Evalua7on  R.  Kyle   Eric  B.  Bauman,  PhD,  RN,  Paramedic   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .              
  2. 2. General  InformaCon  EducaCon:     BA  Sociology:  UW  Wisconsin  –  Madison   •  College  of  LeMers  and  Sciences   MS  Nursing:  UW  Wisconsin  –  Madison   •  School  of  Nursing   PhD  Curriculum  and  InstrucCon:  UW  Wisconsin  –  Madison   •  Games+Learning+Society   •  School  of  EducaCon   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  3. 3. Disclosures/Conflict  of  Interest  &    Professional  AffiliaCons      Managing  Member  –  Clinical  Playground,  LLC   •  Consultant  on  the  WI  TECHNE  Grant      Society  for  SimulaCon  in  Healthcare  (SSH)   •  Chair  –  Website  CommiMee   •  Co-­‐Chair    –  Serious  Games  and  Virtual  Environments  Special  Interest  Group        InternaConal  Nursing  Assoc.  for  Clinical  Learning  and  SimulaCon  (INACSL)   •  Member  –  Website  CommiMee      Games+Learning+Society   •  Affiliate   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  4. 4. ObjecCves  •  Discuss  what  is  meant  by  the  terms(s)   InstrucConal  or  Serious  Gaming?  •  IdenCfy  advantages  of  integraCons  of  Game-­‐ Based  learning  into  curricula?  •  IdenCfy  types  of  content  that  provide  a  “good   fit”  for  content  related  to  nursing  educaCon?   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  5. 5. InstrucConal  or  Serious  Games,  and  SimulaCon   •  TradiConal  PerspecCve  on  Games   –  Goal  Oriented   –  Rule  Based   –  Sense  of  Consequence     •  Rewards  or  otherwise   •  TradiConal  PerspecCve  on  SimulaCon   –  ImitaCon  of  something  real   –  RepresentaCon  of  key  design  elements  or   variables  of  a  system  or  process   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  6. 6. Contemporary  PerspecCve  on  Games  and  SimulaCon  Created  Environment  An  environment  that  has  been  specifically  engineered  to  accurately  replicate  an  actual  exisCng  space,  producing  sufficient  authenCcity  and  fidelity  to  allow  for  the  suspension  of  disbelief.  Simulated  environments,  whether  fixed  in  the  case  of  mannikin-­‐based  simulaCon  laboratories  resembling  elaborate  theatrical  sets,  or  exisCng  in  virtual  reality,  as  in  a  game-­‐based  environments  are  created  environments.   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  7. 7. Contemporary  PerspecCve  on  Games  and  SimulaCon  Designed  Experience  A  designed  experience  is  engineered  to  include  structured  acCviCes  targeted  to  facilitate  interacCons  that  drive  anCcipated  experiences.    These  acCviCes  are  created  to  embody  parCcipant  experience  as  performance.  Many  theme  parks  are  based  in  part  on  the  theory  of  designed  experience.   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  8. 8. Contemporary  PerspecCve  on  Games  and  SimulaCon  Ecology  of  Culturally  Competent  Design  Addresses  the  rigors  and  challenges  of  accurately  situaCng  culture  within  virtual  environments  using  a  four-­‐element  model  that  emphasizes  the  importance  of  ac+vi+es,  contexts,  narra+ves,  and  characters. .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  9. 9. Contemporary  PerspecCve  on  Games  and  SimulaCon   Higher  Order  Simula7on   Higher  order  simulaCon  includes  and  integrates   behavioral  components  into  designed   experiences  exisCng  within  created  spaces,   whether  those  spaces  exist  in  a  fixed  or  virtual   environment…   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  10. 10. Contemporary  PerspecCve  on  Games  and  SimulaCon   Ludology   The  study  of  games  and  other  forms  of  play  and  which   may  include  higher  order  simulaCon,  parCcularly  if  the   experience  integrates  variables  ogen  associated  with   play  or  gaming   InteracCvity  NarraCve   Engagement   Leader  Board   High  Scores     System  of  Rewards   Consequence   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved   Does  higher  order  simulaCon  consCtute   Ludology?  
  11. 11. Games  +  SimulaCon  •  Goal  Oriented    •  Rule  Based  •  Sense  of  Consequence  •  ImitaCon  of  something  real  (AuthenCcity)  •  Accurate  representaCon  of  system(s)  and   related  processes   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  12. 12. ~Serious  Games    Serious  Games  leverage  created  environments   so  that  learning  takes  place  as  performance   though  carefully  designed  experiences  that   ogen  use  a  narraCve  to  promote  curriculum   objecCves   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  13. 13. Why  is  Game-­‐Based  Learning  Important   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  14. 14. Digital  Na7ves  People  who  were  born  with  (contemporary)  digital  technologies    already  in  existence.  Digital  Immigrants  Those  who  were  born  prior  to  (contemporary)  digital  technologies  and  migrated  into  the  digital  realm  adopCng  the  technology  later  in  life.   Prensky  2001     ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  15. 15. About  Today’s  Students    •  Today’s  students/learners  have  a  degree  of  technical  and   digital  literacy  that  generally  far  exceed  that  of  their   instructors  •  They  have  a  host  of  expectaCons  in  how  informaCon   disseminaCon,  presentaCon,  and  transfer  will  take  place  •  Those  insCtuCons  that  fail  to  address  these  expectaCons   will  fail  to  aMract  and  retain  the  best  and  brightest   students   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  16. 16. Why  does  this  maMer?  •  Because  the  best  and  brightest  learners   become:   –  Our  next  generaCon  of  nursing  scholars   –  Well  trained  and  excepConally  educated  nurses   are  a  major  part  of  the  soluCon  to  the   healthcare  crisis  that  we  face  locally,  naConally,   and  internaConally   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  17. 17. Specific  Advantages  •  Different  way  engaging  learners  •  AMends  to  challenges  of  Cme  and  distance   inherent  to  distribuCve  educaCons  •  AMends  to  aspects  of  acculturaCon  not  always   available  in  the  tradiConal  learning   environment  •  There  is  evidence  to  support  videogame   playing  and  some  types  of  procedural  training   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  18. 18. Moreover…   Research  supporCng  educaConal   design,  integraCon,  and  evaluaCon  focusing  on     technology  such  as  SimulaCon  and  Game-­‐Based    learning  is  by  its  very  nature  transformaCve  and  translaConal   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  19. 19. Good  Fit  •  Using  technology  for  the  sake  of  technology   ogen  leaves  students  confused  and  faculty   frustrated    •  Understand  that  all  forms  of  technology  have   their  limitaCons  •  Play  down  the  “coolness”  and  “be-­‐all…  end   all”  factor  with  students.     .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  20. 20. More  Good  Fit…  •  Using  virtual  environments  found  in  online   gaming  environments  are  best  leveraged  for   lessons  that  center  on  behavioral  and  decision   aspects  of  pracCce.   –  AcculturaCon   –  Decision  Making   –  Team  Training     –  Workload/Time  Management   –  Procedural  DemonstraCon   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  21. 21. Examples   3DiTeams-­‐Healthcare   Team  Training  in  a  Virtual   Environment   Jeff  Taekman,  et  al  Duke  University  Medical  Center  
  22. 22. Handwash  Havok   AMempt  to  manipulate  water  drops  to   clean  your  virtual  hand   Orbitec/Hypercosm  
  23. 23. Second  Life/Virtual  Environment   NighCngale  Isle   Jone  Tiffany,  DNP,  RN     New  World  Clinic   Gerald  Stapleton  MS  
  24. 24. Selected  References  Bauman,  E.  (2007).  High  fidelity  simulaCon  in  healthcare.  Ph.D.  dissertaCon,  The  University  of  Wisconsin-­‐Madison,  United  States.  DissertaCons  &  Thesis  @  CIC   InsCtuCons  database.  (PublicaCon  no.  AAT  3294196)    Bauman,  E.  (2010).  Virtual  reality  and  game-­‐based  clinical  educaCon.  In  Gaberson,  K.B.,  &  Oermann,  M.H.  (Eds)  Clinical  teaching  strategies  in  nursing   educa+on  (3rd  ed).New  York,  Springer  Publishing  Company.  Bauman,  E.B.  and  Games,  I.A.  (2011).  Contemporary  theory  for  immersive  worlds:  Addressing  engagement,  culture,  and  diversity.  In  Cheney,  A.  and  Sanders,   R.  (Eds)  Teaching  and  Learning  in  3D  Immersive  Worlds:  Pedagogical  models  and  construc+vist  approaches.  IGI  Global.    Games,  I.  and  Bauman,  E.  (In  Press)  Virtual  worlds:  An  environment  for  cultural  sensiCvity  educaCon  in  the  health  sciences.    Interna+onal  Journal  of  Web   Based  Communi+es  7(2).    Gee,  J.P.  (2003)  What  Videogames  Have  to  Teach  Us  About  Learning  and  Literacy.  New  York,  NY:  Palgrave-­‐McMillan.  Kolb,  D.  (1984).  ExperienCal  learning:  Experience  as  the  source  of  learning  and  development.    Upper  Saddle  River,  NJ:  PrenCce  Hall.  Leape,  L.  L.  (2000).  Errors  in  medicine.  Clinica  Chimica  Acta,  404(1),  2-­‐5.  Prensky,  M.  (2001).  Digital  naCves,  digital  immegrants,  part  1.  On  the  Horizon  9(5).  Taekman  J.M.,  Segall  N.,  Hobbs  G.,  and  Wright,  M.C.  (2007).  3DiTeams:  Healthcare  team  training  in  a  virtual  environment.  Anesthesiology.  2007:  107:  A2145.  Schön,  D.  A.  (1983).  The  reflec+ve  prac++oner:  How  professionals  think  in  ac+on.  New  York:    Basic  Books.  Skiba,  D.  J.  (2009).  Nursing  educaCon  2.0:  A  second  look  at  Second  Life.  Nursing  Educa+on  Perspec+ves,  30,  129-­‐131.  Squire,  K.  (2006).    From  content  to  context:  Videogames  as  designed  experience.    EducaConal  Researcher.    35(8),  19-­‐29.    Squire,  K.,  GiovaneMo,  L.,  DeVane,  B,.  &  Durga,  S.  (2005).  From  users  to  designers:  Building  a  self-­‐organizing  game-­‐based  learning  environment.  Technology   Trends,  49(5),  34-­‐42.  Thiagarajan,  S.  (1992).  Using  games  for  debriefing.  Simula+on  and  Gaming,  23(2),  161-­‐173.    Turkle,  S.  (1995)  Life  on  the  screen.  Iden+ty  in  the  age  of  the  Internet.  New  York:  Touchstone.  
  25. 25. Contact  InformaCon   Eric  B.  Bauman,  PhD,  RN   ebauman@clinicalplayground.com  hMp://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbbauman   hMp://www.slideshare.net/ebauman   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .              

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