Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Improving	Conference	Social	Media	
Engagement:	The	AMEE	Twitter	Story		
Gregory	E.	Gilbert,	EdD,	MSPH,	Pstat®;	Lisa	Buckle...
About	the	Authors	
Gregory	E.	Gilbert,	EdD,	MSPH,	PStat®	is	a	biostatistician	and	owner	of	
SigmaStats®	Consulting,	LLC.	H...
Background,	Purpose,	&	Methods	
•  Social	media	use	has	been	on	the	rise	globally	over	the	last	several	years	
(Micieli	&	...
Results	
•  Unique	Twitter	accounts	during	the	conference	accounted	for	55%	
(2089/3780)	of	conference	registrants.	
•  11...
Tweet	&	Hashtag	Frequency	
©	Gilbert,	Buckley-Paganotti	&	Bauman	2019
Daily	Tweets	&	Platform	
©	Gilbert,	Buckley-Paganotti	&	Bauman	2019
Hashtag	&	User	Frequency	
©	Gilbert,	Buckley-Paganotti	&	Bauman	2019
Take	Home	Message	
•  Baseline	Twitter	data	has	been	documented	to	
allow	for	future	comparisons	of	engagement	
in	social	...
•  Bouchier-hayes	D.,	Nason	G.	J.,	O’Kelly,	F.,	Quinlan,	D.M.,	&	Manecksha,	R.	P.	
(2015).	Twitter	expands	the	reach	and	e...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Improving Conference Social Media Engagement: The AMEE Twitter Story

171 views

Published on

ePoster Presentation at AMEE 2019 - Vienna Austria, 24th - 28th August. Twitter is often being leveraged in academic medicine, particularly at conferences. Tweets are distributed globally and quickly amplify conference content. Twitter is encouraged to promote engagement of attendees and those unable to attend conferences. To our knowledge previous baseline Twitter data do not exist for AMEE conferences.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Improving Conference Social Media Engagement: The AMEE Twitter Story

  1. 1. Improving Conference Social Media Engagement: The AMEE Twitter Story Gregory E. Gilbert, EdD, MSPH, Pstat®; Lisa Buckley Paganotti, MS, PA-C; Eric. B. Bauman, PhD, RN, FSSH Vienna, 24th - 28th August © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  2. 2. About the Authors Gregory E. Gilbert, EdD, MSPH, PStat® is a biostatistician and owner of SigmaStats® Consulting, LLC. He has expertise in simulation and game- based learning as it applies to medical, nursing, and veterinary education. He has numerous publications in the clinical sciences. @DrGEGilbert @SigmaStatsLLC https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gregory_Gilbert5 Lisa Buckley Paganotti MS, PA-C is simulation manager for Ross University School of Medicine. She is currently a PhD student at George Washington University and has been a medical educator since 2011 with interests focused on healthcare simulation. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lisa_Buckley3 Eric B. Bauman, PhD, FSSH, RN, EMT-P is an award winning educational designer and scholar whose research focuses on the use of game-based teaching and learning, simulation, and emerging technology such as AR/VR for clinical education. Dr. Bauman is founder and managing member of Clinical Playground, LLC a nexus of academic and industry collaboration focusing innovative teaching and learning for the health sciences. @bauman1967 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Bauman © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  3. 3. Background, Purpose, & Methods •  Social media use has been on the rise globally over the last several years (Micieli & Micieli, 2012; Udovicich, Barberi, & Perera, 2016). •  Messages are distributed globally and quickly and can amplify session and conference messages. •  Recently, medical societies have been promoting Twitter use at conferences to promote discussion and engagement of both attendees and colleagues who are unable to attend the conference. •  The purpose of this study was to provide a baseline of Twitter usage at the AMEE conference in preparation for further analysis with subsequent data. •  Methods: Each day Twitter data was exported and downloaded. Data for the conference were combined and descriptive statistics generated using R version 3.4.3 (Vienna, AT) software. © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  4. 4. Results •  Unique Twitter accounts during the conference accounted for 55% (2089/3780) of conference registrants. •  11 Twitter accounts made up the top quartile of unique tweets. •  Tweets peaked on Days 3 and 4 (3593 & 3590, respectively). •  Unique accounts tweeting for days one through five were; 216, 621, 985, 944, and 629 respectively. •  The most common hashtags used were #amee2018 representing 49% and #meded representing 12%. •  Remaining hashtags represented less than 2% of tweets each © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  5. 5. Tweet & Hashtag Frequency © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  6. 6. Daily Tweets & Platform © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  7. 7. Hashtag & User Frequency © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  8. 8. Take Home Message •  Baseline Twitter data has been documented to allow for future comparisons of engagement in social media during AMEE conferences. •  To maximize the conference experience, AMEE can use this information to broaden the audience and social media engagement of participants. © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019
  9. 9. •  Bouchier-hayes D., Nason G. J., O’Kelly, F., Quinlan, D.M., & Manecksha, R. P. (2015). Twitter expands the reach and engagement of a national scientific meeting : the Irish Society of Urology. Irish Journal of Medical Science. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-015-1277-6 •  Jalali, A., Sherbino, J., Frank, J., & Sutherland, S. (2015). Social media and medical education : Exploring the potential of Twitter as a learning tool, (October 2014), 1–7. http://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2015.1015502 •  Micieli, R., & Micieli, J. A. (2012). Twitter as a tool for ophthalmologists TO. JCJO, 47(5), 410–413. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjo.2012.05.005 •  Udovicich, C., Barberi, A., & Perera, K. (2016). Tweeting the meeting : A comparative analysis of an Australian emergency medicine conference over four years Objective : Materials and Methods : Results : Conclusion :, 9(1), 28– 31. http://doi.org/10.4103/0974 References © Gilbert, Buckley-Paganotti & Bauman 2019

×