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Training and HR Development in Manufacturing

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Training and HR Development in Manufacturing

  1. 1. Our Only Competative Edge is to Learn Faster than Our Competitors
  2. 2. The Future Possibilities of HRD in Electronic Sector   Laurence Yap M.A. (Uni. Malaya) [Senior Manager] Human Resource Development
  3. 4. How can HRD Contributes to Electronics Industries ?
  4. 5. HRD is the integrated use of training and learning , career development , and organization development to improve individual and organizational effectiveness Patrician McLaren
  5. 6. HRD: New Playing Field
  6. 7. <ul><li>28% </li></ul><ul><li>World Bank Evaluation of Training Impact on Productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Productivity = Profit Gain </li></ul>
  7. 9. WIIFM? <ul><li>Training and HR Profession – Broaden your understanding of training, OD and Career Development </li></ul><ul><li>Functional Managers – Propose your HR Department to experiment these activities </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Managers – Recruit HR/Training personnel who can carry out these activities </li></ul>
  8. 10. Big Picture <ul><li>For Malaysia to compete with the world, HRD can facilitate organization performance and productivity </li></ul><ul><li>For US based MNC, Training is an essential part of Critical Success Factors </li></ul>
  9. 11. Agenda <ul><li>Manufacturing and Semiconductor in </li></ul><ul><li>Malaysia </li></ul><ul><li>2. Current Status of HRD in Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>3. Training Trends in US and Malaysia </li></ul><ul><li>4. Future Possibilities of HRD </li></ul><ul><li>Training, OD and Career Development </li></ul><ul><li>5. After Thought: PSMB and HRD Network </li></ul>
  10. 12. Carsem Background
  11. 13. Carsem: Malaysia Based MNC Carsem (M) Sdn. Bhd. is one of the six largest independent semiconductor sub-contract assembly houses in the world Founded in 1972. Employing well over 8,000 employees today, Carsem has plants in Ipoh (2) + Suzhou (1). A member of the Malaysian Pacific Industries Group ( MPI)
  12. 14. SALES & MARKETING LOCATIONS Dallas Silicon Valley London Ipoh Boston Sales Office Manufacturing Site Suzhou L.A. Taichung
  13. 15. <ul><li>Carsem – M Site </li></ul><ul><li>Founded in 1972 </li></ul><ul><li>Acquired by Hong Leong Group in 1984 </li></ul><ul><li>Floor Space : 436K sq.ft. (40,500 sq. m.) </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce : 3,100 employees </li></ul>CARSEM MANUFACTURING <ul><li>Carsem – S Site </li></ul><ul><li>Production Commenced in 1992 </li></ul><ul><li>Floor Space : 640K sq.ft. (60,000 sq. m.) </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce : 5,600 employees </li></ul><ul><li>Carsem – Suzhou </li></ul><ul><li>Production Commenced in July'04 </li></ul><ul><li>Floor Space : 175K sq.ft. (16,000 sq. m.) </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce : 1,100 employees </li></ul><ul><li>Packages: MLPQ & MLPD </li></ul>
  14. 16. Production <ul><li>Producing over 100 million units per week </li></ul><ul><li>More than 65% of this volume is shipped as fully tested product. </li></ul>
  15. 17. Our Pride Communication
  16. 18. Our Pride Communication
  17. 19. Our Pride Entertainment
  18. 20. Our Pride Safety
  19. 21. MANUFACTURING SITES (Malaysia)
  20. 22. MANUFACTURING SITES (Suzhou, China)
  21. 23. ULTIMATE DESTINATION OF OUR PRODUCTS
  22. 24. APPLICATION OF CARSEM’S PRODUCTS
  23. 25. APPLICATION OF CARSEM’S PRODUCTS
  24. 26. PROCESS FLOW OVERVIEW
  25. 27. Semiconductor Shop floor Postal Service
  26. 29. I. Manufacturing in Malaysia Background
  27. 30. Background <ul><li>The electronics industry is the leading sector in Malaysia's manufacturing sector, contributing significantly o the country's manufacturing sector </li></ul><ul><li>Output </li></ul><ul><li>29.3% or RM 167.2 Billion </li></ul><ul><li>Employment </li></ul><ul><li>28.8% or 296,870 </li></ul>29.3%
  28. 31. Malaysia's Electronics industry: <ul><li>a. Electronic Components </li></ul><ul><li>(Semiconductor) </li></ul><ul><li>38.4 % Electronics export 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>58.7% FDI 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>b. Consumer </li></ul><ul><li>c. Electrical </li></ul>
  29. 32. Semiconductor Sector <ul><li>Semiconductor devices, passive components, printed circuits and other electronic components such as media, substrates and connectors. </li></ul><ul><li>The main export items were: </li></ul><ul><li>Digital monolithic ICs (47.3%) </li></ul><ul><li>Hybrid ICs (15.2%) </li></ul><ul><li>Non-digital monolithic ICs(11.8%) </li></ul>
  30. 33. Semiconductor History <ul><li>The semiconductor industry started in 1970's when the government then embarked on a strategy to attract export-oriented industries into Malaysia . </li></ul><ul><li>From mere assembly and testing operations such as metal-cam packages, p-dip packages, and dip packages, the industry has now moved into higher value-added activities including wafer fabrication and IC design . </li></ul>
  31. 34. IC testing and packaging companies <ul><li>Currently, the IC testing and packaging companies in Malaysia are undertaking more complex packages, to cater for demand which requires faster, smaller and high computing power and multi functional chips . </li></ul>Source: www.miti.gov.my
  32. 35. Packages <ul><li>Organic land grid array packages (OLGA packages); </li></ul><ul><li>ASICs; </li></ul><ul><li>Flip chips </li></ul><ul><li>Ball grid array (BGA) </li></ul><ul><li>Wafer level for IC integration; </li></ul><ul><li>System on Chip (SoC); </li></ul><ul><li>System in package (SiP); and </li></ul><ul><li>Multiplayer packages (MLP) </li></ul>
  33. 36. R&D <ul><li>Some semiconductor companies, especially MNCs have undertaken R&D activities in Malaysia , either in-house, jointly with local universities (UKM, USM, UTAM and UM) or by outsourcing to local R&D companies. </li></ul><ul><li>Motorola – 1000 R&D engineers! </li></ul>Source: www.miti.gov.my
  34. 37. Areas of R&D <ul><li>Process and materials technologies; </li></ul><ul><li>Advanced flip chip packaging development; </li></ul><ul><li>RF module; </li></ul><ul><li>Advanced test technologies development; </li></ul><ul><li>Total packaging; </li></ul><ul><li>Board design; and </li></ul><ul><li>Simulation capabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>(Carsem Technology Center 2007) </li></ul>
  35. 38. In Operations <ul><li>To date, there are 63 companies in operation, producing semiconductor services or undertaking semiconductor related activities. Among these companies are: </li></ul><ul><li>Wafer fabrication – 3 companies (MIMOS, 1 st Silicon and Silterra) </li></ul><ul><li>IC design – 20 companies (mostly with MSC status) </li></ul><ul><li>IC testing & packaging companies – 26 companies (8 Malaysian – owned) </li></ul><ul><li>Other semiconductor devices – 14 companies </li></ul>Source: www.miti.gov.my
  36. 40. II. Current Status of HRD Manufacturing Sector
  37. 41. Research <ul><li>DESIRABILITY AND EXISTENCE OF HRD STRUCTURE IN MALAYSIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS </li></ul><ul><li>Haslinda ABDULLAH, UPM </li></ul>
  38. 42. Methods <ul><li>The questionnaire was sent to all 2,135 manufacturing firms listed under </li></ul><ul><li>the Federal Malaysian Manufacturers (FMM), with a response rate of 16.5%. </li></ul><ul><li>A sample of 50 HR managers was selected to participate in the interviews. </li></ul>
  39. 43. HRD in Manufacturing Firms <ul><li>Human resource development (HRD) in manufacturing firms in Malaysia is rapidly gaining importance </li></ul><ul><li>the Human Resources Development Act, 1992 has been implemented </li></ul><ul><li>1% levy for manufacturing companies </li></ul>
  40. 44. 1. Separate HRD Section <ul><li>100% LE vs 28,9% SMI </li></ul><ul><li>“ Our employees’ training and development is really important to our top management, our business and productivity. We believe that in order to achieve business success, we must have well trained employees, which would be difficult without a separate HRD function…….” </li></ul><ul><li>(HR & Corporate Relations Director; Food, Beverage & Edible Oils; LSI). </li></ul>
  41. 45. 2. HRD Section: 8 years average <ul><li>Most of the HRD sections were first established around the mid 1990s (HRDF Act 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>The minimum number of years for which these sections had been in operation was two years and the maximum was 20, with an average of 8 years. </li></ul>
  42. 46. 3. Labeling: Training Dept <ul><li>“ HRD” departments (18.2 %) - Carsem </li></ul><ul><li>“ Training” departments (55%) – Komag, Mysin </li></ul><ul><li>“ Learning and Development” (15.9 percent) </li></ul><ul><li>- Pfizer </li></ul><ul><li>“ Employee Development and Placement and Talent Development Unit” (6.8 percent). </li></ul>
  43. 47. Labeling and reflection <ul><li>HRD is merely about the provision of training rather than HRD (Training, OD and Career Dev) </li></ul>
  44. 48. Comments <ul><li>“ I have been in this field for more than 10 years. I have seen many changes in the terms, from ‘training’ to ‘HRD’ and now some fancy names……’Capital Development?’…However, the basic concept is merely training. Therefore, whatever term is being used, it will mean the same…’training!’ </li></ul><ul><li>(HR & Administration Manager; Concrete & Cement; LSI). </li></ul>
  45. 49. Lack of HRD Skills <ul><li>It can be deduced that HRD practice in the manufacturing firms in Malaysia is still not very advanced in its development. </li></ul><ul><li>HRD practitioners may require specialized education and training in HRD in order to carry out structured and systematic HRD </li></ul>
  46. 50. 4. HRD Reporting Structure <ul><li>45.4% report to the Human Resource Director </li></ul><ul><li>41.0 % CEO and GMs </li></ul><ul><li>13.6 % Board of Directors and the HR Manager </li></ul>
  47. 51. 5. Fewer Training Centers <ul><li>45.4 percent of Large Enterprise has Training Centers </li></ul>
  48. 52. III Training Trends in US The Impact of Economy Downturn
  49. 53. Impact: Global Financial Crisis
  50. 54. Bersin Associates 2008 Research July-August
  51. 55. Training Budget <ul><li>U.S. Training Groups Cut Budgets </li></ul><ul><li>Fell 11 percent over the past year – from </li></ul><ul><li>$1,202 per learner in 2007 to $1,075 in 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Training Groups Cut Staffing </li></ul><ul><li>The training staff ratios </li></ul><ul><li>SMI: from 7.0 to 4.9 staff for every 1,000 learners. </li></ul><ul><li>LSI: from 5.1 to 3.4 staff-per-thousand. </li></ul>
  52. 56. Comments <ul><li>Many electronics tied up with US market </li></ul><ul><li>Expected cut budget and staff (Penang vs KL) </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce cut HRDF levy 1% to 0.5% for the next 24 months </li></ul><ul><li>Government should subsidized 0.5% </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive market needs upgrading of skills </li></ul>
  53. 57. Training Hours <ul><li>The average number of formal training hours dropped from 25 hours per learner in 2007 to 17.2 hours in 2008 </li></ul>
  54. 58. Type of Programs (1) Basic <ul><li>Funding moved away from IT and leadership development and toward programs that are mandatory program , on meeting compliance requirements and on improving skills that are highly specific to a learner’s job. </li></ul>
  55. 59. Type of Programs (2) Net & Coaching <ul><li>Coaching programs have become especially popular and are now incorporated into 30 percent of all training programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Group and peer-to-peer collaboration are being facilitated through social networking tools , such as communities of practice , wikis and blogs . In fact, the use of communities of practice doubled from 2007 to 2008, making this the fastest-growing segment of the learning tools market today. </li></ul>
  56. 60. Types of Program (3) E-Learning <ul><li>Combined with self-study and e-learning , the total amount of online training dropped from </li></ul><ul><li>30 % of training hours in 2007 to </li></ul><ul><li>24 %in 2008 . </li></ul><ul><li>Cost Reduction: learning technology, content and internal staffing </li></ul>
  57. 62. | Our Challenges: The World Is Changing |
  58. 63. Future Possibilities of HRD
  59. 64. IV Future Possibilities of HRD Training & Learning Organization Development Career Development
  60. 65. Employment Computer Disk Drive US / 1997-2002 Senior Executive Recruitment Outsourcing US / 2006 Training Manager Global Pharmaceutical US / 2006 Learning Manager (Mal & Singapore) Manufacturing (Assembly and Test) Malaysia MNC / 2007 HRD Senior Manager
  61. 66. A. Training and Learning <ul><li>Creative delivery of Training </li></ul><ul><li>Nano Training, Mobile Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Management System </li></ul><ul><li>E-Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate Learning Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment to Department Needs </li></ul><ul><li>YB approaches, Vendor support </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Culture </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmarking, Shared Learning (Book, Best Practice), Internet research, Books and Magazines </li></ul>
  62. 67. Nano Training <ul><li>Short Learning ( 1 hour) </li></ul><ul><li>Lunch, Department Meeting, Coffee Break </li></ul>
  63. 68. Learning Management Sys
  64. 69. Frontline Employee <ul><li>E-Learning – Support annual certification and learning </li></ul><ul><li>for 6000 operators </li></ul><ul><li>21 days of onboarding training </li></ul><ul><li>60 staffs in the department </li></ul><ul><li>Impressed by many customers </li></ul><ul><li>ADI “Best In Class” </li></ul><ul><li>Ros – Section Head </li></ul>
  65. 71. Corporate Learning Strategies Focus on Performance Solution Align to Corporate Objectives Broadening Learning Activities Building Employee Branding Invest in Strategic Learning Leverage on our intellectual capital Partnership with Different Business Unit Cultivate Values and Positive Culture Speed up knowledge transfer
  66. 72. HRD Department Structure HRD Training Administration ( Chew ) Human Capital Development ( Malar ) Frontline Employee (Ros) Lean ( KS Chew ) Technical Skills Development (Chew ) OD ( KW Cheah )
  67. 73. High Performance Model Learning: change Collaborating: speed Teaching: Growth Learning Informal learning formal learning Teaching Management becomes trainers Groom internal employees as trainers Collaborating Network to customers and vendors Cross Function Team Community of Practices
  68. 74. Business Impact <ul><li>YB </li></ul><ul><li>Purchasing </li></ul><ul><li>HR integration </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing, Sales and Marketing Services </li></ul>
  69. 75. Mobile Learning
  70. 76. Second Life
  71. 77. Coaching Maxis iLearning Lab
  72. 78. Benchmarking <ul><li>Kobe about SDWT </li></ul><ul><li>Maxis, Digi, Motorola, Pfizer and Sime Darby </li></ul>
  73. 79. Maxis: Academy Center
  74. 80. Maxis: Academy Center
  75. 81. Maxis Academy Center
  76. 82. Kobe: Benchmarking SDWT
  77. 83. Kobe: Benchmarking SDWT
  78. 84. Knowledge Network HRD Best Practice Sharing 23 rd May 2009 Wisma PSMB
  79. 85. Presentation by Participants
  80. 86. 3 rd Presentation by Hasrul
  81. 87. Sharing by Participants
  82. 88. Fabien from Pfizer
  83. 89. PSMB: Knowledge Network
  84. 90. Facilitation by KC Lim
  85. 91. PSMB Staff with 2 nd Speaker Abd Lin
  86. 92. Internet research <ul><li>Abundance of useful information </li></ul><ul><li>Control for fear of abuse </li></ul>Free software Redes sociales
  87. 93. Tools for Collaboration <ul><li>Social Networks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook, MySpace </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flickr </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>YouTube </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki’s </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul>
  88. 100. Organization Development
  89. 101. B. Organization Development <ul><li>Organization Effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy Planning, Organization Design, Team Collaboration, Facilitation Change </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural Development </li></ul><ul><li>Values, Leadership Development, Positive Mindset </li></ul><ul><li>Work Process Interventions </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Manufacturing, TQM’s Small Group Activities </li></ul>
  90. 102. Strategy Planning <ul><li>Facilitate the direction of organization </li></ul><ul><li>MD Team, Managers and Department </li></ul><ul><li>Tools: Structure Tree, Balance Scorecard </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate with different Business Units </li></ul><ul><li>Review quarterly </li></ul>
  91. 103. Carsem Annual Strategy Meeting 2009
  92. 106. Strategy Planning
  93. 107. Strategy Planning
  94. 108. Strategy Planning
  95. 109. Strategy Planning
  96. 111. Team Bonding <ul><li>Sharing by Leader </li></ul><ul><li>Know Your Team </li></ul><ul><li>STRENGTHS </li></ul><ul><li>SUCCESSES </li></ul><ul><li>Departmental Strengths & Desired Development </li></ul><ul><li>Future Possibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Reorganization </li></ul><ul><li>Summary </li></ul>
  97. 112. Sharing by Leader <ul><li>Hopes </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Expectation </li></ul>
  98. 113. Know Your Team <ul><li>15 Minutes </li></ul><ul><li>Ask as many team members as possible </li></ul>
  99. 114. Appreciation of Strengths
  100. 115. Success
  101. 116. Team Bonding Activities Regular Team Activities
  102. 117. Department Strength and Development
  103. 118. Future Possibilities
  104. 119. Facilitation <ul><li>Make ease with conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Post Mortem (Mydin) </li></ul><ul><li>Went well/Improvement/Next </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciative Inquiry (Pfizer) </li></ul><ul><li>Discover/Dream/Design/Destiny </li></ul><ul><li>Mental Rehearsal (Mydin, Carsem) </li></ul><ul><li>Review/Job Function/Time Flow/Rehearsal </li></ul>
  105. 123. Lean Manufacturing
  106. 124. “ The most dangerous kind of waste is the waste we do not recognize ” ~ Shigeo Shingo 新郷 重夫 Toyota Production System (1909 – 1990 ) Process – Waste = Extra Profit
  107. 125. <ul><li>D efects </li></ul><ul><li>O verproduction </li></ul><ul><li>W aiting </li></ul><ul><li>N on-utilized People </li></ul><ul><li>T ransportation </li></ul><ul><li>I nventory </li></ul><ul><li>M otion </li></ul><ul><li>E xtra Processing </li></ul>8 Wastes A Member of the Hong Leong Group Elimination of waste
  108. 126. AL Model of Carsem: PDCA <ul><li>Address Organization Concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Engage Teams and select projects </li></ul>A. Plan C. Check D. Act B. Do <ul><li>Provide Training </li></ul><ul><li>Carry out projects </li></ul><ul><li>Review results </li></ul><ul><li>Proliferate to other areas </li></ul>
  109. 127. James Womack and Daniel Jones
  110. 128. Jeffrey Liker
  111. 129. 7s McKinsey
  112. 130. The Training Approach The Learn – Do – Mentoring Approach CLASS ROOM LECTURES Lecture on Lean for graduate IE students (Asia Institute of Technology, Bangkok. Faculty of Industrial Engineering) Class Room Lecture during Lean Master training (MMI JB)
  113. 131. HANDS-ON SIMULATIONS & ACTIVITIES Hands-On practical simulation-Quick Changeover (Seagate, Wuxi) Hands-On Value Stream mapping session (MMI Yixing, China)
  114. 132. HANDS-ON SHOP FLOOR ACTIVITIES Shop-Floor exercises (NSK, KL) Shop-Floor exercises Video-Shooting (NSK, KL)
  115. 133. Lean Consultants <ul><li>The AMC founders & principal consultants are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ramesh Victor Rajathavavaram </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lean Master (USA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Soundrarajan Pitchay </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lean Master (USA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>URL: http://www.adv-mc.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email: rameshvictor@adv-mc.com </li></ul></ul>
  116. 134. Consulting
  117. 135. <ul><li>Wave 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Lean overview </li></ul><ul><li>Value Stream Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Set-up Reduction </li></ul><ul><li>5S </li></ul><ul><li>Change Management </li></ul><ul><li>Wave 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Visual Management </li></ul><ul><li>Standardized Work </li></ul><ul><li>Error Proofing </li></ul><ul><li>Handling Resistance </li></ul>LEAN IMPLEMENTATION IN CARSEM <ul><li>Factory will be more Visual & Organize </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced set-up time </li></ul><ul><li>Factory will have less error </li></ul><ul><li>Work will be more standardize/repeatable </li></ul><ul><li>Wave 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Material Control (Kanban) </li></ul><ul><li>Total Production Mgt (TPM) </li></ul><ul><li>Overall Engineering Efficiency (OEE) </li></ul><ul><li>Performance Measurement </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce pull mechanism through Kanban </li></ul><ul><li>Working with lower level of inventory </li></ul><ul><li>Improve equipment OEE </li></ul><ul><li>Wave 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Theory of constraints </li></ul><ul><li>Lay-out optimization </li></ul><ul><li>IT Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Diagnostics </li></ul><ul><li>Further strengthen the whole Value Stream Map after the 3 waves project. </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Masters have advanced diagnostic ability for continuous improvement on their own VSM (Value Stream Mapping) </li></ul><ul><li>Lean lay-out </li></ul>
  118. 137. C. Career Development <ul><li>Competency Development </li></ul><ul><li>Talent Management </li></ul><ul><li>Succession Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching and Mentoring </li></ul>
  119. 138. AMA Management Competency Model
  120. 140. Think Global Managerial Skills
  121. 141. 100000 Fresh Graduates
  122. 142. Future Managerial Skills <ul><li>What are the skills and competencies of future Managers in Manufacturing? </li></ul><ul><li>Positive Mindset </li></ul><ul><li>People Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitation Process </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and innovative (Informal Learning) </li></ul><ul><li>Business Acumen (MBA) </li></ul>
  123. 143. Growth of HRD Shared Learning Team Upgrade Training function to HRD
  124. 144. Role of PSMB Consulting, Resource Center & HRD Functions
  125. 145. Summary <ul><li>Manufacturing and Semiconductor in </li></ul><ul><li>Malaysia </li></ul><ul><li>2. Current Status of HRD in Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>3. Training Trends in US and Malaysia </li></ul><ul><li>4. Future Possibilities of HRD </li></ul><ul><li>Training, OD and Career Development </li></ul><ul><li>After Thought: </li></ul><ul><li>HRD/Training, PSMB </li></ul>
  126. 146. OD, Training and Education www.linkedin.com/laurnceyap Corporate Learning www.journeyofhrd.blogspot.com HRD Best Practice Malaysia www.facebook.com Chief Learning Officer Network network.clomedia.com/profile/LaurenceYap Contact Network
  127. 150. [KL. PG. Singapore. Ipoh] 13 Years (1993-2009) Performance Consulting Training & Development Organization Development HRD Career
  128. 151. Employment Computer Disk Drive US / 1997-2002 Senior Executive Recruitment Outsourcing US / 2006 Training Manager Global Pharmaceutical US / 2006 Learning Manager (Mal & Singapore) Manufacturing (Assembly and Test) Malaysia MNC / 2007 HRD Senior Manager
  129. 152. Higher Education B.A (Hons.), M.A Social Science Fellowship Award 1990-1993 Management European History Malaysia Development Asian Politics Chinese Studies Indian Culture Japanese Religious
  130. 153. OD, Training and Education www.linkedin.com/laurnceyap Corporate Learning www.journeyofhrd.blogspot.com HRD Best Practice Malaysia www.facebook.com Chief Learning Officer Network network.clomedia.com/profile/LaurenceYap Contact Network
  131. 154. Postal Service Work in Semiconductor
  132. 155. Comments <ul><li>Formulate Corporate Learning Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate organization development works </li></ul>
  133. 156. Nine Strategies Focus on Performance Solution Align to Corporate Objectives Broadening Learning Activities Building Employee Branding Invest in Strategic Learning Leverage on our intellectual capital Partnership with Different Business Unit Cultivate Values and Positive Culture Speed up knowledge transfer
  134. 157. High Performance Model Learning: change Collaborating: speed Teaching: Growth Learning Informal learning formal learning Teaching Management becomes trainers Groom internal employees as trainers Collaborating Network to customers and vendors Cross Function Team Community of Practices

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