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Silvana Richardson - Making Learning Visible

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Eaquals Riga 2017

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Silvana Richardson - Making Learning Visible

  1. 1. Making learning visible to teachers and students Silvana Richardson, Bell ©Eaquals Eaquals International Conference, Riga, 27 – 29 April 2017 www.eaquals.org 1
  2. 2. Big data in education research We now have the equivalent of the microscope and the telescope for understanding learning and teaching in powerful ways. What was previously invisible can now be studied and shaped. Chris Dede
  3. 3. Meanwhile, in ELT… ByOdooley(Ownwork)[CCBY-SA3.0(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)],viaWikimediaCommons
  4. 4. How well am I doing? What am I learning today? What am I doing this for? What does success look like? How can I improve?
  5. 5. Invisible teaching Do they know what they are expected to do? Did everybod y really get it? What are they really thinking? What impact does my teachin g have?
  6. 6. Intentions 1. Be (more) aware of the importance of making learning visible to both teachers and learners 2. Be (more) familiar with a range of strategies and techniques for making learning visible 3. Be (more) aware of how to support teachers as they learn about and embed visible learning strategies into their practice
  7. 7. What is visible learning?
  8. 8. Making learning visible? What do you understand by ‘making learning visible’? To answer this question 1) Grab your smartphone or tablet 2) Go to https://padlet.com/silvanamrichard/visible or scan this code with a QR reader
  9. 9. Why visible learning?
  10. 10. Visible learning John Hattie
  11. 11. Visible learning Making student learning visible to teachers so they can know whether they are having an impact on their students’ learning
  12. 12. Making learning visible to the students, so they learn to become their own teachers -important for becoming lifelong learners Visible learning
  13. 13. Visible Learning - key ideas John Hattie When supporting teachers…
  14. 14. Making learning more visible Strategies for teachers 1. Sharing learning intentions with students 2. Working with success criteria 3. Seeking out feedback on learning
  15. 15. Strategy 1: Sharing learning intentions with students
  16. 16. Why share learning intentions? Sharing learning intentions with students • is an impactful intervention • makes the focus and direction of the lesson explicitly clear to both teachers and students
  17. 17. Aims, outcomes, intentions TEACHING AIMS LEARNING OUTCOMES LEARNING INTENTIONS ‘Teacher speak’ ‘Translated’ for students
  18. 18. Good learning intentions • state 1. what we want students to learn or achieve 2. to what level 3. why we want them to learn this • are • specific and clear to students • ambitious (= appropriately challenging) for every student differentiated
  19. 19. An example Today you will learn to use the passive voice accurately to explain the process of rubbish recycling. This will help you describe processes appropriately in reports for IELTS Writing task 2. .
  20. 20. An example Today you will learn to use the passive voice accurately to explain the process of rubbish recycling. This will help you describe processes appropriately in reports for IELTS Writing task 2. . WHAT?
  21. 21. An example Today you will learn to use the passive voice accurately to explain the process of rubbish recycling. This will help you describe processes appropriately in reports for IELTS Writing task 2. . TO WHAT LEVEL?
  22. 22. An example Today you will learn to use the passive voice accurately to explain the process of rubbish recycling. This will help you describe processes appropriately in reports for IELTS Writing task 2. WHY?
  23. 23. Discuss in your group 1. When you watch lessons, how often do you see teachers display, share and review learning intentions with their learners? 2. Is this something you encourage them to do? Why (not)? 3. What are the typical issues with the learning intentions written by the (trainee) teachers you work with? (If they don’t display these, then think about the learning objectives or outcomes they write in their plans). How do you help them get better at this? 4. How much feedback do you give them on their learning intentions, and how high are your expectations? 4 mins
  24. 24. Issues with learning intentions (Trainee) Teachers’ issues • Vague, unclear • Not sufficiently challenging • Not differentiated • Worded as activities or stages in the lesson (e.g.: ‘We will review future forms’ )
  25. 25. Issues with learning intentions Trainers’/DoSes’ issues • Do not always give teachers sufficient or regular feedback on learning intentions • Do not always consider it important that teachers get learning intentions right - insufficient practice on this
  26. 26. Supporting teachers 1. Distinguish between good and bad examples 2. Improve bad models 3. Student-proof outcomes to create clear learning intentions 4. Self and peer assess against criteria (SMART)
  27. 27. 1. Distinguish
  28. 28. 2. Improve 3. Student-proof
  29. 29. 4. Assess against criteria Self and/or peer assess learning intentions (the ‘SMART test’)
  30. 30. 4. Assess against criteria Self and/or peer assess learning intentions (the ‘SMART test’)
  31. 31. Advice for teachers Encourage teachers to do this and feed back on this 1. Display and communicate learning intentions at the start of the lesson, or produce them in conjunction with students 2. Check with students that they are clear about the learning intentions 3. Talk to students about why they are studying what they are studying 4. Ask the students to self-assess against the learning intentions at different points in the lesson
  32. 32. Strategy for teachers 2: Working with success criteria
  33. 33. ‘Thumbometer’ = always = from time to time = never 1. I teach teachers explicitly about success criteria. 2. I expect teachers to work with success criteria in their lessons.
  34. 34. John Hattie 2. Success criteria Visible learning is when students know what success looks like before they start
  35. 35. 2. Success criteria Statements that describe upfront how both the teacher and the learners will know that they have been successful in achieving the learning intention Developing success criteria is a vital element of formative assessment What? What for?
  36. 36. Success criteria – Example 1 Level: A2 Task: Speaking: Describe a picture Success Criteria: • Describe where people are, using 4-8 prepositions • Describe what clothes people are wearing • Use 5-10 verbs in the Present Continuous correctly Source: Anna Young, Bell Cambridge
  37. 37. Success criteria and personalised targets Source: Anna Young, Bell Cambridge
  38. 38. Success criteria – Example 2 Level: B2 (FCE) Task: FCE, Speaking, Part 2, the ‘Long Turn’. Talk about two photos on your own for a minute. Then answer the question the examiner asks.
  39. 39. Success criteria – Example 2 Success Criteria: • Use correct forms of comparative adjectives • Use language to talk about similarities • Use language to talk about differences • Use vocabulary related to the topic of the photos • Use linkers correctly • Answer the question Source: Emily Curran, Bell Cambridge
  40. 40. Success criteria and peer assessment
  41. 41. A possible procedure: writing with success criteria 1. Elicit success criteria after analysing a good model text. 2. Joint writing using success criteria as a guide. 3. Students write their text and use the success criteria as a checklist before submitting it. 4. Peer assessment using the success criteria. 5. Teacher assessment using the success criteria.
  42. 42. Eliciting success criteria from a model OpenMindPre-Intermediate,p43
  43. 43. Emerging success criteria
  44. 44. Joint writing with success criteria in mind Set the scene (when, who, where, for how long) Give details using past simple and adjectives Make recommend -ations using imperatives
  45. 45. Working with success criteria: a teacher’s experience
  46. 46. Success criteria – Included? Certificate programmes Diploma programmes
  47. 47. Strategy for teachers 3: Seeking out feedback on learning
  48. 48. Why feedback? Feedback has one of the most significant effects on learning. John Hattie (Also in Black & Wiliam)
  49. 49. Feedback in planning CELTA trainee Delta candidate
  50. 50. Feedback and assessment strategies
  51. 51. Feedback and assessment strategies Evidence of deliberate planning of feedback 1. Random nomination strategy to avoid undirected questioning 2. Specific and focused monitoring
  52. 52. The problem with volunteering to answer Task 4
  53. 53. What have we done? a) Broaden the range of feedback strategies b) Help teachers match activity with strategy c) Make the feedback strategy explicit
  54. 54. Broaden the range of feedback strategies Pose, pause, pounce and bounce Thumbs up/down/middle Smiley faces Online instant feedback Random nomination
  55. 55. Task 1. Work individually on the task in the worksheet. 2. Any thoughts/reactions?
  56. 56. Help teachers match activity with feedback strategy Source: Lindsay Warwick, Bell Cambridge
  57. 57. Teacher activity Students’ activity Feedback strategy Give instructions – remind Ss not to supply answers. Read out 5 statements. Notice who understood and who didn’t. Listen. Listen to the statements. Hold up T/F cards. Immediate visual feedback - T/F cards Make the feedback strategies explicit in the procedure
  58. 58. Making it happen at Bell A multipronged approach Assessment criteria in observation form A sustained thematic thread in CPD programme Learning walks Action Research (and dissemination) Making learning visible Quality assurance Teacher learning
  59. 59. Top take-aways?
  60. 60. Thanks! Silvana.Richardson@bellenglish.com @bellteachers www.bellenglish.com

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