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Exploiting EAQUALS CEFR 
curriculum aids 
Brian North 
(CEFR co-author) 
©Eaquals 2014 1
Agenda 
1: Talk: The CEFR: How it helps, what it is 
2. Demonstration: Eaquals Resources 
3. Groups: Brain-storming, Repor...
How the CEFR helps 
•Real World Orientation 
•Course Organisation 
•Communication 
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
3
Real World Orientation 
•Can Do descriptors can be used to orient course aims and syllabus content to real world needs (“n...
Course Organisation 
•Coherent system: Input (content) and output (levels achieved) on same scale of levels: aims, course ...
Communication 
•Teachers can talk to learners about their level, their goals, their progress towards their goals – can hig...
www.coe/int 
www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/
www.coe/int 
www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/
www.coe/int 
www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/
CEFR 
Ch1. The CEFR in its political and educational context 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. La...
CEFR 
Ch1. The CEFR in its political and educational context 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. La...
CEFR 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner 
Ch5. The compe...
CEFR 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner 
Ch5. The compe...
“Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social ag...
“Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social ag...
“Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social ag...
“Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social ag...
CEFR 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner 
Ch5. The compe...
Ch4: Descriptors: Activities 
Communicative 
Strategies 
Communicative 
Language Competencies 
Reception Production 
Under...
Informal Discussion B2 
Can take an active part in informal discussion in familiar contexts, commenting, putting point of ...
CEFR 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner 
Ch5. The compe...
Communicative 
Strategies 
General 
Linguistic 
Vocabulary 
Range 
Range 
Grammatical 
Accuracy 
Phonological 
Control 
Vo...
Vocabulary control B2 
Lexical accuracy is generally high, though some confusion and incorrect word choice does occur with...
CEFR 
Ch2. Approach adopted 
Ch3. Common reference levels 
Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner 
Ch5. The compe...
CEFR Table 1 
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
25 
ProficientC2Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summar...
CEFR Table 2 
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
26 
A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 UNDERSTANDING listening I can recognise familiar words and very b...
CEFR Table 3 
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
27 
RANGE 
ACCURACY 
FLUENCY 
INTERACTION 
COHERENCE 
C2 
Shows great flexibility refor...
CEFR Table 3 
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
28 
RANGE 
ACCURACY 
FLUENCY 
INTERACTION 
COHERENCE 
C2 
Shows great flexibility refor...
Common questions 
•What is B2? Show me please! 
•How can I reorient a curriculum/syllabus to the CEFR? 
•What is the core ...
Agenda 
1: Talk: CEFR, Eaquals Resources 
2. Demonstration: Eaquals Resources 
3. Groups: Brain-storming, Reporting, Discu...
Eaquals CEFR Resources 
Levels 
•Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) 
•EAQUALS/AL...
Descriptors 
©Eaquals 2014 
32 
Eaquals/Alte ELP 2000 
-Original ELP: descriptors very close to CEFR 
-English, French, Ge...
© Eaquals 2014 
33
Resources: eELP 
© Eaquals 2014 
34
© Eaquals 2014 
35
Resources: eELP 
© Eaquals 2014 
36
Resources: eELP 
© Eaquals 2014 
37
Resources: eELP 
© Eaquals 2014 
38
Resources: eELP 
© Eaquals 2014 
39
© Eaquals 2014 
40
Resources: DVD 
© Eaquals 2014 41 
www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert 
English, French, German, Italian and 
Spanish 
www.webce...
Resources: DVD 
© Eaquals 2014 42 
www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert 
English, French, German, Italian and 
Spanish 
www.webce...
Resources: DVD 
© Eaquals 2014 
43
Eaquals CEFR Resources 
Levels 
•Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) 
•EAQUALS/AL...
Curriculum: Guide; Case Studies 
•Self-help Guide with tasks 
•Case studies 
•Self-help Guide – annotated with extracts fr...
The institution’s educational philosophy 
Can Do’s related to levels & examination aims 
Methods, techniques, activities, ...
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
47 
B2: Upper Intermediate Spoken Interaction  Take an active part in a discussion, using a range of...
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
48 
B2: Upper Intermediate Spoken Interaction  Take an active part in a discussion, using a range of...
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
49 
CEFR LEVEL: A2 BELL KRAKOW LEVEL: 3 COMMUNICATIVE OBJECTIVES 2008/2009 STUDENT: ……………..……………. GRO...
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
50 
Listening: A2: Level 2 - English File Pre- intermediate I can understand what is said clearly, sl...
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
51
Core Inventory: Aim 
Document the core of English/French taught at CEFR levels A1 to C1 
•Functions and notions 
•Discours...
Core Inventory: Outcome 
•Map of language problems across levels 
•Map of text types across levels 
•Core language points ...
Scenarios 
•Starting from real world needs 
•Fitting everything together, putting everything in context 
•Going from theor...
Eaquals CEFR Resources 
Levels 
•Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) 
•EAQUALS/AL...
LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) OVERVIEW B1 DOMAIN CONTEXT TASKS ACTIVITIES TEXTS Personal / Educational H...
LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) IMPLEMENTATION B1 TASK 1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Follow short introduction to ...
LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) TASK 1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Follow short introduction to a TV guided commen...
LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) TASK 2 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Match 10 things that are mentioned (avoiding 3 ...
Questions Section A: 1. Henry VIII, King of England, died 500 years ago. F 2. Henry VIII was one of the richest kings in E...
Assessment ideas– B1 
CEFR Descriptor Micro-activities Text features Task features Item types Example 
B1 I can generally ...
CEFR Descriptor Micro- activities Text features Task features Item types Example I can catch the main points in TV program...
CEFR Descriptor Micro- activities Text features Task features Item types Example I can catch the main points in TV program...
CEFR Descriptor Micro- activities Text features Task features Item types Example I can catch the main points in TV program...
Developing scenarios 
1.Start with descriptors 
2.Brain-storm ideas for example activities – right hand column 
3.Select M...
Eaquals CEFR Resources 
Levels 
•Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) 
•EAQUALS/AL...
Assessing Speaking 
Elicitation: Activities appropriate to an action-oriented curriculum 
•Select the communicative activi...
CEFR Table 3 
RANGE 
ACCURACY 
FLUENCY 
INTERACTION 
COHERENCE 
C2 
Shows great flexibility reformulating ideas in differi...
CEFR Table 3 - reduced 
RANGE 
ACCURACY 
FLUENCY 
B2+ 
5 
•clear descriptions, views 
•not much sign of having to restrict...
Criteria at B2? 
RANGE 
•clear descriptions, views 
•little searching for words 
•some complex sentence forms 
1 
2 
3 
4 ...
Standardising interpretation of levels 
–Standardisation training with calibrated examples and common CEFR criteria 
–Tran...
Standardisation Training 
1.Illustration with documented samples 
2.Small group discussion of other documented samples 
3....
Why do Moderation? 
Assessment Errors: 
•Using own, private concepts and criteria 
•Unconscious lead criterion (accuracy /...
Moderation Techniques 
•Collectivity (e.g. second assessor) 
•Other information (e.g. “anchor test”) 
•Quality Control 
Mo...
Common questions 
•What is B2? Show me please! 
•How can I reorient a curriculum/syllabus to the CEFR? 
•What is the core ...
Agenda 
1: Talk: The CEFR, How it helps, What it is 
2. Demonstration: Eaquals Resources 
3. Groups: Brain-storming, Repor...
How the CEFR helps 
•Real World Orientation RED 
•Course Organisation YELLOW 
•Communication GREEN 
©Eaquals 06/08/2014 
82
Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at diffe...
Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at diffe...
Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at diffe...
Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at diffe...
Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at diffe...
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Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at different levels - Brian North

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Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR

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Curriculum, assessment & the CEFR: Exploiting Eaquals CEFR curriculum aids: teaching content and assessment tasks at different levels - Brian North

  1. 1. Exploiting EAQUALS CEFR curriculum aids Brian North (CEFR co-author) ©Eaquals 2014 1
  2. 2. Agenda 1: Talk: The CEFR: How it helps, what it is 2. Demonstration: Eaquals Resources 3. Groups: Brain-storming, Reporting, Discussion 4. Plenary: Reports & Discussion ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 2
  3. 3. How the CEFR helps •Real World Orientation •Course Organisation •Communication ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 3
  4. 4. Real World Orientation •Can Do descriptors can be used to orient course aims and syllabus content to real world needs (“needs analysis”). •Can Do descriptors help teachers think “top down,” from what these learners need to do in the language, rather than just bottom up “from the grammar progression and what mistakes students make (“action.-oriented approach”). •Can Do descriptors (in course aims) help teachers select suitable communicative activities, rather than using isolated skills and topics as the primary organising principles (= the 1961 Lado model). •Quality descriptors (in course aims, in assessment grids) enrich teachers’ thinking beyond grammatical accuracy, vocabulary, pronunciation (= the 1961 Lado model). ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 4
  5. 5. Course Organisation •Coherent system: Input (content) and output (levels achieved) on same scale of levels: aims, course content, classes, books, tests, results, certificates: linked into one coherent system •Proficiency gain: Pre-course/Entry test, exit tests, examinations linked into one coherent system; progress tracking •Course planning: (week/term; day; lesson) related to course aims (descriptors, key language points) •Materials: cross-references to course aims (descriptors, key language points) •Assessment: (teacher assessment, self-assessment, school progress tests) •Certification: (Standardisation, moderation) ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 5
  6. 6. Communication •Teachers can talk to learners about their level, their goals, their progress towards their goals – can highlight relevant communicative aims & key language points •Teachers can communicate more easily – including between levels and language departments •Academic managers can communicate more easily with other schools •The “product” (proficiency gain) can be described to learners and sponsors (parents, employers, …): Course aims (at the end of 12 weeks, he should be able to …), progress tracking, reports, certification •Schools can communicate more easily with education authorities, inspectors etc. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 6
  7. 7. www.coe/int www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/
  8. 8. www.coe/int www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/
  9. 9. www.coe/int www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/
  10. 10. CEFR Ch1. The CEFR in its political and educational context Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner Ch6. Language learning and teaching Ch7. The role of tasks in language learning and teaching Ch8. Linguistic diversification and the curriculum Ch9. Assessment ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 10
  11. 11. CEFR Ch1. The CEFR in its political and educational context Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner Ch6. Language learning and teaching Ch7. The role of tasks in language learning and teaching Ch8. Linguistic diversification and the curriculum Ch9. Assessment ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 11
  12. 12. CEFR Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 12
  13. 13. CEFR Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 13
  14. 14. “Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social agents develop a range of competences, both general and in particular communicative language competences. They draw on the competences at their disposal in various contexts under various conditions and under various constraints to engage in language activities involving language processes to produce and/or receive texts in relation to themes in specific domains, activating those strategies which seem most appropriate for carrying out the tasks to be accomplished.” (CEFR: 9)
  15. 15. “Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social agents develop a range of competences, both general and in particular communicative language competences. They draw on the competences at their disposal in various contexts under various conditions and under various constraints to engage in language activities involving language processes to produce and/or receive texts in relation to themes in specific domains, activating those strategies which seem most appropriate for carrying out the tasks to be accomplished.” (CEFR: 9)
  16. 16. “Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social agents develop a range of competences, both general and in particular communicative language competences. They draw on the competences at their disposal in various contexts under various conditions and under various constraints to engage in language activities involving language processes to produce and/or receive texts in relation to themes in specific domains, activating those strategies which seem most appropriate for carrying out the tasks to be accomplished.” CEFR Chapter 4 Language use and the language user/learner
  17. 17. “Language use, embracing language learning, comprises the actions performed by persons who as individuals and as social agents develop a range of competences, both general and in particular communicative language competences. They draw on the competences at their disposal in various contexts under various conditions and under various constraints to engage in language activities involving language processes to produce and/or receive texts in relation to themes in specific domains, activating those strategies which seem most appropriate for carrying out the tasks to be accomplished.” (CEFR: 9) CEFR Chapter 5 The competences of the user/learner
  18. 18. CEFR Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 18
  19. 19. Ch4: Descriptors: Activities Communicative Strategies Communicative Language Competencies Reception Production Understanding a native speaker Conversation Informal Discussion Formal Discussion Obtaining Goods and Services Interviewing & being interviewed Spoken Written Interaction Mediation Overall Language Proficiency Communicative Activities
  20. 20. Informal Discussion B2 Can take an active part in informal discussion in familiar contexts, commenting, putting point of view clearly, evaluating alternative proposals and making and responding to hypotheses. Can with some effort catch much of what is said around him/her in discussion, but may find it difficult to participate effectively in discussion with several native speakers who do not modify their language in any way. Ch4: Descriptors
  21. 21. CEFR Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 21
  22. 22. Communicative Strategies General Linguistic Vocabulary Range Range Grammatical Accuracy Phonological Control Vocabulary Control Orthographic Control Control Linguistic Sociolinguistic Pragmatic Communicative Language Competencies Communicative Activities Overall language Proficiency Ch4: Descriptors: Quality
  23. 23. Vocabulary control B2 Lexical accuracy is generally high, though some confusion and incorrect word choice does occur without hindering communication. Ch4: Descriptors
  24. 24. CEFR Ch2. Approach adopted Ch3. Common reference levels Ch4. Language use and the language user/learner Ch5. The competences of the user/learner ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 24
  25. 25. CEFR Table 1 ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 25 ProficientC2Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spokenand written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can expresshim/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in morecomplex situations. UserC1Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can expresshim/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use languageflexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesivedevices. Independ- entB2Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technicaldiscussions in his/her field of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makesregular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailedtext on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages anddisadvantages of various options. UserB1Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the languageis spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describeexperiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions andplans. BasicA2Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate insimple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas ofimmediate need. UserA1Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction ofneeds of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions aboutpersonal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in asimple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
  26. 26. CEFR Table 2 ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 26 A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 UNDERSTANDING listening I can recognise familiar words and very basic phrases concerning myself, my family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly. I can understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). I can catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements. I can understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. I can understand the main point of many radio or TV programmes on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can understand extended speech and lectures and follow even complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar. I can understand most TV news and current affairs programmes. I can understand the majority of films in standard dialect. I can understand extended speech even when it is not clearly structured and when relationships are only implied and not signalled explicitly. I can understand television programmes and films without too much effort. I have no difficulty in understanding any kind of spoken language, whether live or broadcast, even when delivered at fast native speed, provided. I have some time to get familiar with the accent. Reading I can understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues. I can read very short, simple texts. I can find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material such as advertisements, prospectuses, menus and timetables and I can understand short simple personal letters. I can understand texts that consist mainly of high frequency everyday or job-related language. I can understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters. I can read articles and reports concerned with contemporary problems in which the writers adopt particular stances or viewpoints. I can understand contemporary literary prose. I can understand long and complex factual and literary texts, appreciating distinctions of style. I can understand specialised articles and longer technical instructions, even when they do not relate to my field. I can read with ease virtually all forms of the written language, including abstract, structurally or linguistically complex texts such as manuals, specialised articles and literary works. SPEAKING Spoken Interaction I can interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help me formulate what I'm trying to say. I can ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics. I can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities. I can handle very short social exchanges, even though I can't usually understand enough to keep the conversation going myself. I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an areas where the language is spoken. I can enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (e.g. family, hobbies, work, travel and current events). I can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible. I can take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, accounting for and sustaining my views. I can express myself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. I can use language flexibly and effectively for social and professional purposes. I can formulate ideas and opinions with precision and relate my contribution skilfully to those of other speakers. I can take part effortlessly in any conversation of discussion and have a good familiarity with idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. I can express myself fluently and convey finer shades of meaning precisely. If I do have a problem I can backtrack and restructure around the difficulty so smoothly that other people are hardly aware of it. Spoken Production I can use simple phrases and sentences to describe where I live and people I know. I can use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms my family and other people, living conditions, my educational background and my present or most recent job. I can connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, my dreams, hopes and ambitions. I can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. I can narrate a story or relate the plot of a book or film and describe my reactions. I can present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to my field of interest. I can explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. I can present clear, detailed descriptions of complex subjects integrating sub-themes, developing particular points and rounding off with an appropriate conclusion. I can present a clear, smoothly-flowing description or argument in a style appropriate to the context and with an effective logical structure which helps the recipient to notice and remember significant points. WRITING Writing I can write a short, simple postcard, for examples sending holiday greetings. I can fill in forms with personal details, for example entering my name, nationality and address on a hotel registration form. I can write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need. I can write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something. I can write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. I can write personal letters describing experiences and impressions. I can write clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects related to my interests. I can write an essay or report, passing on information or giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view. I can write letters highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences. I can express myself in clear, well- structured text, expressing points of view at some length. I can write detailed expositions of complex subjects in a letter, an essay or a report, underlining what I consider to be the salient issues. I can write different kinds of texts in an assured, personal, style appropriate to the reader in mind. I can write clear, smoothly-flowing text in an appropriate style. I can write complex letters, reports or articles which present a case with an effective logical structure which helps the recipient to notice and remember significant points. I can write summaries and reviews of professional or literary works. CEF TABLE 2: Language Passport: Self-assessment grid
  27. 27. CEFR Table 3 ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 27 RANGE ACCURACY FLUENCY INTERACTION COHERENCE C2 Shows great flexibility reformulating ideas in differing linguistic forms to convey finer shades of meaning precisely, to give emphasis, to differentiate and to eliminate ambiguity. Also has a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. Maintains consistent grammatical control of complex language, even while attention is otherwise engaged (e.g. in forward planning, in monitoring others' reactions). Can express him/herself spontaneously at length with a natural colloquial flow, avoiding or backtracking around any difficulty so smoothly that the interlocutor is hardly aware of it. Can interact with ease and skill, picking up and using non-verbal and intonational cues apparently effortlessly. Can interweave his/her contribution into the joint discourse with fully natural turntaking, referencing, allusion making etc. Can create coherent and cohesive discourse making full and appropriate use of a variety of organisational patterns and a wide range of connectors and other cohesive devices. C1 Has a good command of a broad range of language allowing him/her to select a formulation to express him/ herself clearly in an appropriate style on a wide range of general, academic, professional or leisure topics without having to restrict what he/she wants to say. Consistently maintains a high degree of grammatical accuracy; errors are rare, difficult to spot and generally corrected when they do occur. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously, almost effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject can hinder a natural, smooth flow of language. Can select a suitable phrase from a readily available range of discourse functions to preface his remarks in order to get or to keep the floor and to relate his/her own contributions skilfully to those of other speakers. Can produce clear, smoothly flowing, well-structured speech, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices. B2+ B2 Has a sufficient range of language to be able to give clear descriptions, express viewpoints on most general topics, without much conspicuous searching for words, using some complex sentence forms to do so. Shows a relatively high degree of grammatical control. Does not make errors which cause misun- derstanding, and can correct most of his/her mistakes. Can produce stretches of language with a fairly even tempo; although he/she can be hesitant as he or she searches for patterns and expressions, there are few noticeably long pauses. Can initiate discourse, take his/her turn when appropriate and end conversation when he/she needs to, though he/she may not always do this elegantly. Can help the discussion along on familiar ground confirming comprehension, inviting others in, etc. Can use a limited number of cohesive devices to link his/her utterances into clear, coherent discourse, though there may be some "jumpiness" in a long con- tribution. B1+ B1 Has enough language to get by, with sufficient vocabulary to express him/herself with some hesitation and circumlocutions on topics such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events. Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used "routines" and patterns associated with more predictable situations. Can keep going comprehensibly, even though pausing for grammatical and lexical planning and repair is very evident, especially in longer stretches of free production. Can initiate, maintain and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal interest. Can repeat back part of what someone has said to confirm mutual understanding. Can link a series of shorter, discrete simple elements into a connected, linear sequence of points.
  28. 28. CEFR Table 3 ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 28 RANGE ACCURACY FLUENCY INTERACTION COHERENCE C2 Shows great flexibility reformulating ideas in differing linguistic forms to convey finer shades of meaning precisely, to give emphasis, to differentiate and to eliminate ambiguity. Also has a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. Maintains consistent grammatical control of complex language, even while attention is otherwise engaged (e.g. in forward planning, in monitoring others' reactions). Can express him/herself spontaneously at length with a natural colloquial flow, avoiding or backtracking around any difficulty so smoothly that the interlocutor is hardly aware of it. Can interact with ease and skill, picking up and using non-verbal and intonational cues apparently effortlessly. Can interweave his/her contribution into the joint discourse with fully natural turntaking, referencing, allusion making etc. Can create coherent and cohesive discourse making full and appropriate use of a variety of organisational patterns and a wide range of connectors and other cohesive devices. C1 Has a good command of a broad range of language allowing him/her to select a formulation to express him/ herself clearly in an appropriate style on a wide range of general, academic, professional or leisure topics without having to restrict what he/she wants to say. Consistently maintains a high degree of grammatical accuracy; errors are rare, difficult to spot and generally corrected when they do occur. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously, almost effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject can hinder a natural, smooth flow of language. Can select a suitable phrase from a readily available range of discourse functions to preface his remarks in order to get or to keep the floor and to relate his/her own contributions skilfully to those of other speakers. Can produce clear, smoothly flowing, well-structured speech, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices. B2+ B2 Has a sufficient range of language to be able to give clear descriptions, express viewpoints on most general topics, without much conspicuous searching for words, using some complex sentence forms to do so. Shows a relatively high degree of grammatical control. Does not make errors which cause misun- derstanding, and can correct most of his/her mistakes. Can produce stretches of language with a fairly even tempo; although he/she can be hesitant as he or she searches for patterns and expressions, there are few noticeably long pauses. Can initiate discourse, take his/her turn when appropriate and end conversation when he/she needs to, though he/she may not always do this elegantly. Can help the discussion along on familiar ground confirming comprehension, inviting others in, etc. Can use a limited number of cohesive devices to link his/her utterances into clear, coherent discourse, though there may be some "jumpiness" in a long con- tribution. B1+ B1 Has enough language to get by, with sufficient vocabulary to express him/herself with some hesitation and circumlocutions on topics such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events. Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used "routines" and patterns associated with more predictable situations. Can keep going comprehensibly, even though pausing for grammatical and lexical planning and repair is very evident, especially in longer stretches of free production. Can initiate, maintain and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal interest. Can repeat back part of what someone has said to confirm mutual understanding. Can link a series of shorter, discrete simple elements into a connected, linear sequence of points.
  29. 29. Common questions •What is B2? Show me please! •How can I reorient a curriculum/syllabus to the CEFR? •What is the core language content for B2? •What type of texts are suitable for B2? •What type of tasks are suitable for B2? •When is a person “B2” anyway? •How do I distinguish between a performance at B1 or B1+ and at B2? •How can we check teachers interpret B2 the same way? ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 29
  30. 30. Agenda 1: Talk: CEFR, Eaquals Resources 2. Demonstration: Eaquals Resources 3. Groups: Brain-storming, Reporting, Discussion 4. Plenary: Reports & Discussion ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 30
  31. 31. Eaquals CEFR Resources Levels •Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) •EAQUALS/ALTE electronic European Language Portfolio www.eelp.org •DVDs of video samples, with documentation www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert Course Planning •Curriculum guide •Curriculum “Can Do” Case Studies •Core Inventory: English, (French in April 2015) Assessment & Certification •CEFR Assessment Tasks (Listening & Reading; English & French) •CEFR-based teacher assessment procedures •CEFR Standardisation training packs for assessment of speaking, writing •CEFR Certification scheme ©Eaquals 2014 31
  32. 32. Descriptors ©Eaquals 2014 32 Eaquals/Alte ELP 2000 -Original ELP: descriptors very close to CEFR -English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Basque, Croatian, Dutch, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovak Eaquals Can Do project 2008 -Eaquals bank: Includes “plus levels” (English only) www.coe.int/lang - CEFR bank of descriptors -CEFR originals (English) -Bank from ELPs (English, different languages) End 2015 -Extended Set (English, French) -YL bank (English, different languages)
  33. 33. © Eaquals 2014 33
  34. 34. Resources: eELP © Eaquals 2014 34
  35. 35. © Eaquals 2014 35
  36. 36. Resources: eELP © Eaquals 2014 36
  37. 37. Resources: eELP © Eaquals 2014 37
  38. 38. Resources: eELP © Eaquals 2014 38
  39. 39. Resources: eELP © Eaquals 2014 39
  40. 40. © Eaquals 2014 40
  41. 41. Resources: DVD © Eaquals 2014 41 www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert English, French, German, Italian and Spanish www.webcef.eu Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian and Polish
  42. 42. Resources: DVD © Eaquals 2014 42 www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert English, French, German, Italian and Spanish www.webcef.eu Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian and Polish
  43. 43. Resources: DVD © Eaquals 2014 43
  44. 44. Eaquals CEFR Resources Levels •Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) •EAQUALS/ALTE electronic European Language Portfolio www.eelp.org •DVDs of video samples, with documentation www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert Course Planning •Curriculum guide •Curriculum “Can Do” Case Studies •Core Inventory: English, (French in April 2015) Assessment & Certification •CEFR Assessment Tasks (Listening & Reading; English & French) •CEFR-based teacher assessment procedures •CEFR Standardisation training packs for assessment of speaking, writing •CEFR Certification scheme ©Eaquals 2014 44
  45. 45. Curriculum: Guide; Case Studies •Self-help Guide with tasks •Case studies •Self-help Guide – annotated with extracts from Case Studies •“…….take a critical look at your present curriculum and syllabus documents and start the development from there. We would definitely want to encourage you to start from the curriculum and syllabuses that you have used so far. Do not discard anything that has worked well in your institution. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 45
  46. 46. The institution’s educational philosophy Can Do’s related to levels & examination aims Methods, techniques, activities, materials Syllabus; schemes of work; orientation Assessment: ongoing + certification Curriculum Planning
  47. 47. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 47 B2: Upper Intermediate Spoken Interaction  Take an active part in a discussion, using a range of language to do so  Ask for, give and justify opinions showing awareness of the situation  Plan a meeting or presentation, organise tasks and check that they are done  Make and respond to assumptions, deductions and hypotheses  Compare and contrast alternatives, supporting your preferences  Evaluate advantages and disadvantages, and participate in reaching a decision  Express personal feelings and emotional responses, including wishes and regrets  Complain, express disappointment and find a solution to a problem Spoken Production & Writing  Give/write a clear, detailed descriptions of a person, place, or job or study experience  Give/write detailed accounts of plans, activities and experiences  Give/write an evaluative description of a book, film or show  Give/write a viewpoint on a topical issue, considering points for and against the options  Develop an argument in speech or writing, expanding and supporting your point of view  Summarise and report extended information after a group discussion, etc  Give/write descriptions of events/experiences demonstrating their personal significance  Write a formal letter Communicative Tasks The most important things you need to do in the language at this level. Listening  Follow discussion around you  Understand announcements and messages spoken at normal speed  Understand documentaries and interviews, identifying the speakers’ feelings and attitudes  Follow the majority of films in standard dialect  Follow complex lines of argument around familiar topics Reading  Skim read a magazine or newspaper to decide what to read  Recognise the writer’s implied views and feelings in a text  Understand reviews dealing with the content and criticism of films, theatre, books, etc.  Follow the plot and the development of ideas in novels and short stories  Identify the level of formality employed in a text  Recognise discourse and reference markers for cohesion in text Grammar  Past tenses review: Past Simple and Continuous, Present Perfect Simple and Continuous; Past Perfect Simple and Continuous  Future tenses review: Present Continuous, going to, will, Future Continuous  Passives: present perfect, future, modals; Passives used with reporting verbs  Modal verbs (would, could, should, might) including deduction in the past (must have)  Conditionals: 3rd – contrast with 1st and 2nd + mixed conditionals, wish/if only  Infinitives after verbs and adjectives (e.g. I promise to do; I am happy to do)  Reported speech and reporting verbs  Relative clauses: Defining / non-defining (I have a car which is very fast / I have a car now, which means I can get out of town)  Adjectives + infinitive (e.g. I was surprised to hear)  Linkers/sequencing (e.g. despite, whereas, firstly, moreover)  Inversions (Not only … but also…, No sooner … ) Language Resources The grammar and vocabulary you need to communicate successfully in the communicative tasks listed above. Vocabulary  Collocation (highly qualified, greatly admired)  Word formation: nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs  Conjunctions and linking words  Phrasal verbs (e.g. put out a light; give out books)  Confusing / similar words (e.g. unsatisfied/dissatisfied)  Phrases for contrasting points of view (e.g. on the one hand ….., on the other hand….)  Modifiers and intensifiers (e.g. quite, really, extremely, absolutely)  Detailed vocabulary for expressing emotions and reactions  Detailed vocabulary for describing people and places
  48. 48. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 48 B2: Upper Intermediate Spoken Interaction  Take an active part in a discussion, using a range of language to do so  Ask for, give and justify opinions showing awareness of the situation  Plan a meeting or presentation, organise tasks and check that they are done  Make and respond to assumptions, deductions and hypotheses  Compare and contrast alternatives, supporting your preferences  Evaluate advantages and disadvantages, and participate in reaching a decision  Express personal feelings and emotional responses, including wishes and regrets  Complain, express disappointment and find a solution to a problem Spoken Production & Writing  Give/write a clear, detailed descriptions of a person, place, or job or study experience  Give/write detailed accounts of plans, activities and experiences  Give/write an evaluative description of a book, film or show  Give/write a viewpoint on a topical issue, considering points for and against the options  Develop an argument in speech or writing, expanding and supporting your point of view  Summarise and report extended information after a group discussion, etc  Give/write descriptions of events/experiences demonstrating their personal significance  Write a formal letter Communicative Tasks The most important things you need to do in the language at this level. Listening  Follow discussion around you  Understand announcements and messages spoken at normal speed  Understand documentaries and interviews, identifying the speakers’ feelings and attitudes  Follow the majority of films in standard dialect  Follow complex lines of argument around familiar topics Reading  Skim read a magazine or newspaper to decide what to read  Recognise the writer’s implied views and feelings in a text  Understand reviews dealing with the content and criticism of films, theatre, books, etc.  Follow the plot and the development of ideas in novels and short stories  Identify the level of formality employed in a text  Recognise discourse and reference markers for cohesion in text
  49. 49. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 49 CEFR LEVEL: A2 BELL KRAKOW LEVEL: 3 COMMUNICATIVE OBJECTIVES 2008/2009 STUDENT: ……………..……………. GROUP: ………………… Indicate the student’s performance regarding the following partial competences by ticking the appropriate column: poor (P), good (G), excellent (Ex) P G Ex Listening and Speaking*  understand what is said clearly, slowly and directly in simple everyday conversations  participate in short social exchanges, introduce him/herself, get information about travel, order something to drink or eat, make and respond to invitations, etc. Reading*  understand simple written messages from friends or colleagues  understand simple user’s instructions for equipment  understand a simple personal letter in which the writer tells or asks about aspects of everyday life Writing*  write short, simple notes and messages  fill in a questionnaire about his/her educational background, job, interests and specific skills  briefly introduce him/herself in a letter with simple phrases and sentences (family, job, hobbies)  write simple sentences, connecting them with words such as “and”, “but”, “because” Grammar and Vocabulary*  produce simple grammatical structures that have been learnt and practised in class  describe past activities and personal experiences (e.g. the last weekend, his/her last holiday)  refer to future plans *The European Language Portfolio, CODN Warszawa: accredited model No.6.2000, http://culture2.coe.int/portfolio Bell Krakow: Continuous assessment checklist.
  50. 50. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 50 Listening: A2: Level 2 - English File Pre- intermediate I can understand what is said clearly, slowly and directly to me in simple everyday conversation; it is possible to make me understand, if the speaker can take the trouble. I can generally identify the topic of discussion around me when people speak slowly and clearly I can understand phrases, words and expressions related to areas of most immediate priority (e.g very basic personal and family information, shopping, local area, employment). I can catch the main point in short, clear simple messages and announcements. I can understand the essential information in short recorded passages dealing with predictable everyday matters which are spoken slowly and clearly. I can identify the main point of TV news items reporting events, accidents etc. when the visual supports the commentary. Understand numbers, times, dates and prices in a variety of contexts (File 1A) Understand the gist and specific information in a monologue about relationships (File 1B) Understand the gist and specific information in a description/discussion of a famous painting (File 1C) Understand the gist and specific details in a popular song (File 1C) Understand the gist and specific information in a radio quiz programmeme about words (File 1D) Understand a short oral summary of the development of a relationship (File 1PE/W/RC) Understand the gist and specific information in a conversation at an immigration desk (File 1PE/W/RC) Understand the gist and specific information in a simple social conversation (greeting someone after a journey) (File 1PE/W/RC) British Institute Seville – CEFR mapping – Can do statements by skill A2 – New English File Pre-Intermediate
  51. 51. ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 51
  52. 52. Core Inventory: Aim Document the core of English/French taught at CEFR levels A1 to C1 •Functions and notions •Discourse markers •Grammar •Lexis •Socio-cultural (French only)
  53. 53. Core Inventory: Outcome •Map of language problems across levels •Map of text types across levels •Core language points •Exponents •Prototype Scenarios
  54. 54. Scenarios •Starting from real world needs •Fitting everything together, putting everything in context •Going from theoretical to practical and vice-versa •Summarising what language, strategies and enabling skills are needed for a task
  55. 55. Eaquals CEFR Resources Levels •Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) •EAQUALS/ALTE electronic European Language Portfolio www.eelp.org •DVDs of video samples, with documentation www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert Course Planning •Curriculum guide •Curriculum “Can Do” Case Studies •Core Inventory: English, (French in April 2015) Assessment & Certification •CEFR Assessment Tasks (Listening & Reading; English & French): •CEFR-based teacher assessment procedures •CEFR Standardisation training packs for assessment of speaking, writing •CEFR Certification scheme ©Eaquals 2014 60
  56. 56. LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) OVERVIEW B1 DOMAIN CONTEXT TASKS ACTIVITIES TEXTS Personal / Educational Home Following a simple, factual TV/web documentary Following the commentary, accompanying the visuals Listening as a member of an audience Watching TV/web video clip A guided commentary on a place (historic building, resort, town etc.) LEVEL B1 CAN-DOS* I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can follow a lecture or talk within my own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured. MICROACTIVITIES* RECOGNISE  useful information DISTINGUISH  main points from specific details  aspects reported as facts from those reported as opinion UNDERSTAND  an explicitly signalled line of argument  main conclusions  specific details TEXT FEATURES*  Long but straightforward text  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Clearly signposted/signalled with explicit markers  Familiar topics regularly encountered in a school, work or leisure context * Content From CEFR scales and/or Swiss EAQUALS-ALTE Portfolio in normal print Elaborated content (e.g. Micro-activities chart) in italics COMPETENCES STRATEGIC Recognise the beginning of a significantly new and different part of the text Recognise where difficulty lies (subject/assumed knowledge, linguistic) Use context to deduce probable meaning of unknown words (repetition, visuals, gesture, what comes next) Use the beginning of a significantly new and different part of the text to intensify effort PRAGMATIC Functional Discourse Describing places Describing events Describing feelings, emotions, attitude Linkers: sequential – past time Connecting words expressing cause and effect, contrast etc. (e.g. on the other hand; however; despite) Summarising LINGUISTIC Grammatical Lexical Phonological Past time: Simple past, past continuous, used to, past perfect Passive (past) Reporting structures 3rd conditional / mixed conditionals Must/can’t/might have Intensifiers Comparatives / Superlatives Adjectives for places and people Time phrases (e.g. In the last century ; 50 years ago) Verbs describing construction, development (e.g. plan, construct, rebuild, renovate, demolish) Emphasis in sentence stress
  57. 57. LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) IMPLEMENTATION B1 TASK 1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Follow short introduction to a TV guided commentary on Hampton Court, answering 5 True / False / Not Stated questions while listening SOURCES “The Tudors: Behind Hampton Court”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX7ABmAlcAE Natalie Dormer of The Tudors celebrates the 500th anniversary of Henry 8's coronation by touring the Hampton Court palace Other possibilities might be: Simon Schama going round Versailles; extract from travel programme, tourist promotion) AUTHENTICITY Authentic LENGTH Ca. 7-10 minutes TEXT FEATURES VISUAL SUPPORT Yes – commentary should match unfolding film ITEM TYPE / NUMBER Introduction: True / False / Not stated: (5 questions) TASK RUBRIC Follow this introduction to a TV guided commentary on a historic place of interest “Hampton Court Palace,” near London and answer the 5 questions. Mark “T” if the statement is True, “F” if it is false and “NS” if the information is Not Stated in the commentary. TIME While playing MARK SCHEME 5 x 1 mark = 5 marks TASK 2 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Match 10 things that are mentioned (avoiding 3 distractors) to the parts of the palace they relate to. ITEM TYPE / NUMBER Matching: Match things mentioned in the commentary to the part of Hampton Court concerned (3 extra distractors). TASK RUBRIC Follow main body of the guided commentary. While you are listening match the 10 things in the list to the parts of the palace they relate to. Put a cross in the correct box for each point on the list. Note: 3 of the points on the list are not mentioned. TIME While playing MARK SCHEME 10 x 0.5 marks = 5 marks TASK 3 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Answer 5 open questions which are read before listening to the recording a second time. ITEM TYPE / NUMBER Open questions: 5 TASK RUBRIC After listening, answer the following 5 questions with information from the commentary. TIME 10 minutes MARK SCHEME 5 x 2 marks = 10 marks. 2: complete answer; 1: partial answer. Grammar and spelling not penalised.
  58. 58. LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) TASK 1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Follow short introduction to a TV guided commentary on Hampton Court, answering 5 True / False / Not Stated questions while listening SOURCES “The Tudors: Behind Hampton Court”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX7ABmAlcAE Natalie Dormer of The Tudors celebrates the 500th anniversary of Henry 8's coronation by touring the Hampton Court palace Other possibilities might be: Simon Schama going round Versailles; extract from travel programme, tourist promotion) Authentic Ca. 7-10 minutes TEXT FEATURES Yes – commentary should match unfolding film ITEM TYPE / NUMBER Introduction: True / False / Not stated: (5 questions) TASK RUBRIC Follow this introduction to a TV guided commentary on a historic place of interest “Hampton Court Palace,” near London and answer the 5 questions. Mark “T” if the statement is True, “F” if it is false and “NS” if the information is Not Stated in the commentary. TIME While playing MARK SCHEME 5 x 1 mark = 5 marks
  59. 59. LISTENING ASSESSMENT: SITE TOUR (HAMPTON COURT) TASK 2 GENERAL DESCRIPTION Match 10 things that are mentioned (avoiding 3 distractors) to the parts of the palace they relate to. ITEM TYPE / NUMBER Matching: Match things mentioned in the commentary to the part of Hampton Court concerned (3 extra distractors). TASK RUBRIC Follow main body of the guided commentary. While you are listening match the 10 things in the list to the parts of the palace they relate to. Put a cross in the correct box for each point on the list. Note: 3 of the points on the list are not mentioned. TIME While playing MARK SCHEME 10 x 0.5 marks = 5 marks
  60. 60. Questions Section A: 1. Henry VIII, King of England, died 500 years ago. F 2. Henry VIII was one of the richest kings in Europe. NS 3. Henry bought Hampton Court from Cardinal Wolsey. F 4. Hampton Court was one of the most luxurious and modern palaces of its time. T 5. Henry had other palaces too, all connected by the river. T Section B: Matching The Great Kitchen The Great Hall The Council Chamber The Haunted Gallery The Gardens The most magnificent room in the palace      A Collection of gold      Animals representing the different queens’ personal symbols      A picture of the Pope      Very big fireplaces      Theatre and drama      Discussion of state business      Tapestries with gold thread      A ghost (of Catherine Howard)      Windows that make coloured light      Weapons      Entertainment      Court ceremonies 
  61. 61. Assessment ideas– B1 CEFR Descriptor Micro-activities Text features Task features Item types Example B1 I can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around me, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect.  Understand main/most important information  Understand main conclusions  Series of 3-4 extracts  Perhaps from same TV talk show  Clear, standard, straight-forward, relatively slow  Extremely short (c 1 min)  Hear once only (in test)  One item per extract  No tricky distracters  True / False / NS  Matching (really a repeated MCQ with 5-6 alternatives)  New MCQ each extract Identify main point of short conversation extracts B1 I can listen to a short narrative and form hypotheses about what will happen next.  Follow, though not necessarily in detail  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Distinguish main point / relevant facts and inform-ation from specific details – not central to story line  Narrative in linear order  Chain of events – consequences  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Hear once only  Guess what comes next - recording stops at question point  Answer to each question on separate paper, handed in  Series of MCQ – only one alternative makes sense Follow a narrative and answer 5 MCQs to predict what comes next when the audio text stops B1 I can understand the main points of radio news bulletins and sim-pler recorded material on topics of personal interest delivered relatively slowly and clearly.  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Understand main/most important information  Topics in field of general personal interest  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Hear once only  Straight forward transfer of info, in order of text  T /F / NS  Matching  Information transfer to table  Open questions Follow radio news and answer questions / complete table about 4 or 5 of the stories (Total c 10 questions) B1 I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.  Follow, though not necessarily in detail  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Understand main/most important information  Distinguish conclusion from preceding detail  Familiar topics regularly encountered in a school, work or leisure context  TV programmes: (interviews) short lectures, news reports  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Could hear twice/three times  Identifying main information  Identifying when conclusion is starting  Catching main conclusion  Information transfer to table  Open ended questions Follow a simple, factual TV/web documentary (c 5-10 mins), understand the main points and complete the table / answer open questions B1 I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can follow a lecture or talk within my own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured.  Distinguish main points from specific details  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Understand specific details  TV programme with short report/guide and interview(s)  Familiar topics regularly encountered in a school, work or leisure context  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Could hear twice/three times  Recognising sections (relevant to topics of questions)  Identifying essential information  T / F / NS  Matching  Information transfer (table or diagram)  Open ended questions Follow a TV guided commentary on a place (e.g. Tour of Hampton Court, Versailles; extract from travel programme / tourism promotion) B1+ I can understand a large part of many TV programmes on topics of personal interest such as interviews, short lectures, and news reports when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.  Understand main/most important information  Understand main conclusions  Daytime / local TV news – perhaps a studio audience  Factual interview  Straightforward factual interview questions  Descrip.s of events / plans  Descrip.s of feelings, wishes  Identifying adv.s / disadv.s of a plan  Identifying consequences  Identifying the opinions of the main speakers (for / against: why?)  T / F / NS  Information transfer (table)  Open ended questions Listen to a straightforward, factual interview from a current affairs TV magazine programme (or local news) and understand both main points and specific details
  62. 62. CEFR Descriptor Micro- activities Text features Task features Item types Example I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can follow a lecture or talk within my own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured.  Distinguish main points from specific details  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Understand specific details  TV programme with short report/guide and interview(s)  Familiar topics regularly encountered in a school, work or leisure context  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Could hear 2/3 times  Recognise sections (relevant to questions  Identify essential info  T / F / NS  Matching  Info transfer (table or diagram)  Open ended questions Follow a TV guided commentary on a place (e.g. - Tour of Hampton Court - Tour of Versailles; - Extract from travel programme - Extract from tourism promotion)
  63. 63. CEFR Descriptor Micro- activities Text features Task features Item types Example I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can follow a lecture or talk within my own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured.  Distinguish main points from specific details  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Understand specific details  TV programme with short report/guide and interview(s)  Clearly structured  Familiar topics regularly encountered in a school, work or leisure context  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Could hear 2/3 times  Recog- nise sections (relev- ant to questions  Identify essential info  T / F / NS  Matching  Info transfer (table or diagram)  Open ended questions Follow a TV guided commentary on a place (e.g. - Tour of Hampton Court - Tour of Versailles; - Extract from travel programme - Extract from tourism promotion)
  64. 64. CEFR Descriptor Micro- activities Text features Task features Item types Example I can catch the main points in TV programmes on familiar topics when the delivery is relatively slow and clear. I can follow a lecture or talk within my own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured.  Distinguish main points from specific details  Understand an explicitly signalled line of narrative / argument  Understand specific details  TV programme with short report/guide and interview(s)  Clearly structured  Familiar topics regularly encountered in a school, work or leisure context  Clear, standard, straightforward, relatively slow  Could hear 2/3 times  Recog- nise sections (relev- ant to questions  Identify essential info  T / F / NS  Matching  Info transfer (table or diagram)  Open ended questions Follow a TV guided commentary on a place (e.g. - Tour of Hampton Court - Tour of Versailles; - Extract from travel programme - Extract from tourism promotion)
  65. 65. Developing scenarios 1.Start with descriptors 2.Brain-storm ideas for example activities – right hand column 3.Select Micro-activities from selected descriptor(s) & micro-activities chart 4.Select text features from selected descriptors & CEFR Salient features chart 5.What would the learners need to do?  Task features 6.What item types might be suitable for that?  Item types
  66. 66. Eaquals CEFR Resources Levels •Descriptors – including “plus levels”: (as levels, as scales, as checklists) •EAQUALS/ALTE electronic European Language Portfolio www.eelp.org •DVDs of video samples, with documentation www.ciep.fr/en/publi_evalcert Course Planning •Curriculum guide •Curriculum “Can Do” Case Studies •Core Inventory: English, (French in April 2015) Assessment & Certification •CEFR Assessment Tasks (Listening & Reading; English & French): •CEFR-based teacher assessment procedures •CEFR Standardisation training packs for assessment of speaking, writing •CEFR Certification scheme ©Eaquals 2014 71
  67. 67. Assessing Speaking Elicitation: Activities appropriate to an action-oriented curriculum •Select the communicative activities – e.g. types of speaking activities •Design tasks Judgement: Qualitative criteria •Consult CEFR Table 3 & descriptors •Create marking grids
  68. 68. CEFR Table 3 RANGE ACCURACY FLUENCY INTERACTION COHERENCE C2 Shows great flexibility reformulating ideas in differing linguistic forms to convey finer shades of meaning precisely, to give emphasis, to differentiate and to eliminate ambiguity. Also has a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. Maintains consistent grammatical control of complex language, even while attention is otherwise engaged (e.g. in forward planning, in monitoring others' reactions). Can express him/herself spontaneously at length with a natural colloquial flow, avoiding or backtracking around any difficulty so smoothly that the interlocutor is hardly aware of it. Can interact with ease and skill, picking up and using non-verbal and intonational cues apparently effortlessly. Can interweave his/her contribution into the joint discourse with fully natural turntaking, referencing, allusion making etc. Can create coherent and cohesive discourse making full and appropriate use of a variety of organisational patterns and a wide range of connectors and other cohesive devices. C1 Has a good command of a broad range of language allowing him/her to select a formulation to express him/ herself clearly in an appropriate style on a wide range of general, academic, professional or leisure topics without having to restrict what he/she wants to say. Consistently maintains a high degree of grammatical accuracy; errors are rare, difficult to spot and generally corrected when they do occur. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously, almost effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject can hinder a natural, smooth flow of language. Can select a suitable phrase from a readily available range of discourse functions to preface his remarks in order to get or to keep the floor and to relate his/her own contributions skilfully to those of other speakers. Can produce clear, smoothly flowing, well-structured speech, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices. B2+ B2 Has a sufficient range of language to be able to give clear descriptions, express viewpoints on most general topics, without much conspicuous searching for words, using some complex sentence forms to do so. Shows a relatively high degree of grammatical control. Does not make errors which cause misun- derstanding, and can correct most of his/her mistakes. Can produce stretches of language with a fairly even tempo; although he/she can be hesitant as he or she searches for patterns and expressions, there are few noticeably long pauses. Can initiate discourse, take his/her turn when appropriate and end conversation when he/she needs to, though he/she may not always do this elegantly. Can help the discussion along on familiar ground confirming comprehension, inviting others in, etc. Can use a limited number of cohesive devices to link his/her utterances into clear, coherent discourse, though there may be some "jumpiness" in a long con- tribution. B1+ B1 Has enough language to get by, with sufficient vocabulary to express him/herself with some hesitation and circumlocutions on topics such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events. Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used "routines" and patterns associated with more predictable situations. Can keep going comprehensibly, even though pausing for grammatical and lexical planning and repair is very evident, especially in longer stretches of free production. Can initiate, maintain and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal interest. Can repeat back part of what someone has said to confirm mutual understanding. Can link a series of shorter, discrete simple elements into a connected, linear sequence of points.
  69. 69. CEFR Table 3 - reduced RANGE ACCURACY FLUENCY B2+ 5 •clear descriptions, views •not much sign of having to restrict what wants to say •variety of linking words used efficiently to mark clearly the relationships between ideas •good grammatical control •occasional rare "slips" often corrected •communicate spontaneously •often remarkable ease of expression in longer stretches •use circumlocution and paraphrase to cover gaps 4 B2 3 •Clear, coherent descriptions and views •little searching for words •some complex sentence forms But: limited variation •no errors causing misunderstanding, •correct most of his/her mistakes But: mistakes and wrong vocab do often occur: •stretches of language with fairly even tempo •few noticeably long pauses_ But: can be hesitant searching for expressions may be "jumpiness" in long contribution. 2 B1+ 1 • express main points • express own thoughts • with reasonable precision •reasonable accuracy •But: noticeable mother tongue influences •able to keep going effectively without help •But: some problems resulting in pauses and "cul-de-sacs"
  70. 70. Criteria at B2? RANGE •clear descriptions, views •little searching for words •some complex sentence forms 1 2 3 4 5 ACCURACY •no errors causing misunderstanding, •correct most of his/her mistakes 1 2 3 4 5 FLUENCY stretches of language with fairly even tempo •few noticeably long pauses_ •But: can be hesitant searching for patterns and expressions 1 2 3 4 5 COHERENCE coherent discourse, •But: limited variation, •may be "jumpiness" in long contribution. 1 2 3 4 5 GLOBAL Overall impression mark 1 2 3 4 5
  71. 71. Standardising interpretation of levels –Standardisation training with calibrated examples and common CEFR criteria –Transfer to local examples (videos, scripts) Standardisation Standardising assessment practice –Assessing the same thing –Valid judgements, Practicality
  72. 72. Standardisation Training 1.Illustration with documented samples 2.Small group discussion of other documented samples 3.Individual rating of documented samples - followed by group discussion – consensus 4.Individual rating of local samples - followed by group discussion – consensus
  73. 73. Why do Moderation? Assessment Errors: •Using own, private concepts and criteria •Unconscious lead criterion (accuracy / fluency) •Severity / lenience •Refusal to give top grade/mark Training cannot change “hard cases”
  74. 74. Moderation Techniques •Collectivity (e.g. second assessor) •Other information (e.g. “anchor test”) •Quality Control Moderation removes extremes and makes all aware of the problem
  75. 75. Common questions •What is B2? Show me please! •How can I reorient a curriculum/syllabus to the CEFR? •What is the core language content for B2? •What type of texts are suitable for B2? •What type of tasks are suitable for B2? •When is a person “B2” anyway? •How do I distinguish between a performance at B1 or B1+ and at B2? •How can we check teachers interpret B2 the same way? ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 80
  76. 76. Agenda 1: Talk: The CEFR, How it helps, What it is 2. Demonstration: Eaquals Resources 3. Groups: Brain-storming, Reporting, Discussion 4. Plenary: Reports & Discussion ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 81
  77. 77. How the CEFR helps •Real World Orientation RED •Course Organisation YELLOW •Communication GREEN ©Eaquals 06/08/2014 82

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