Successfully reported this slideshow.

Abstract Expressionism Webquest

3,524 views

Published on

An exploration of Abstract Expressionism designed for advanced high school art students.

Published in: Economy & Finance, Education
  • Be the first to comment

Abstract Expressionism Webquest

  1. 1. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for advanced high school artists Designed by Elizabeth A. Hamilton [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Jackson Pollock’s “Autumn Rhythm” Photo by Flickr; Ricardo.Martins
  2. 2. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Your struggling local art museum has been given a small grant to put together an exhibit featuring a handful of notable works of art. Your benefactor requires that you use the money to explore American contributions to art, but has left the choice of artists and works up to you. Rather than bring together four unrelated pieces, you have decided to choose one artist to explore in-depth through your museum exhibit. Because your museum displays primarily modern and non-objective art, your curator has decided to use this opportunity to examine the Abstract Expressionist movement. With these requirements in mind, the museum staff and some visitors from a local magazine have gathered to decide how to proceed… Photo by Flickr; Jakob Lodwick
  3. 3. Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Done right, this exhibit could save your museum and draw all kinds of money-spending visitors to your town. Your team’s job will be to choose art and information for the exhibit and to generate public interest in order to guarantee success. Title Together, you will choose an artist, then split up to complete specialized tasks based on your areas of expertise. When your exhibition opens you will have four pieces of art to display, biographical brochures about the artist, plaques to hang beside the works you have chosen, a print advertisement highlighting the importance of the artist to American history, and a magazine “preview” article with a critique of one piece of art from the gallery. Draw a crowd to your little museum! Photo by Flickr: Wallyg
  4. 4. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Asst. Curator Historian Publicist Critic Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Before you can start arranging your gallery, you need to choose the artist whose work you will display! As a group, browse the following websites to learn a little about Abstract Expressionism, and choose one artist that interests you. * ArtLex for Abstract Expressionism * ArtCyclopedia Entry * ArtChive Entry Think about how the work of the artist you choose will represent the movement as a whole! Once you’ve decided on an artist, it’s time to split up to work on the details that will make the show a success. Everyone has a job to do… Assistant Curator Historian Publicist Critic
  5. 5. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Asst. Curator Historian Publicist Critic Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Visit some of the following websites, and choose FOUR works of art by your group’s chosen artist to be included in the gallery. Write the text for a small plaque to be displayed on the wall beside each piece. Include the title and date of the work, list any interesting facts you learned about it, and explain why it was chosen to represent the artist. * Worldwide Arts Resources * ArtNet Artist Index
  6. 6. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Asst. Curator Historian Publicist Critic Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Research the artist your group has chosen, and create an “Introduction to the Artist” pamphlet that visitors will pick up before entering the gallery. Include key people, places, and dates in the artists’ life, a brief discussion of what else was going on in the world when your artist started working, and anything else you find interesting or important. Your job is to make sure visitors know a little about the artist before seeing the art. Use the following websites to guide your research: Worldwide Arts Resources * The Artists
  7. 7. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Asst. Curator Historian Publicist Critic Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Create a two-page spread advertisement for the exhibit, which will be featured in a magazine. Consider the themes explored by your artist, and explain why his or her art is an important part of American history. Try to appeal to fans of art and history, as well as to the average person. * Stanklos.com Abstract Expressionism Entry *I biblio Webmuseum * Themes in American Art--Abstraction
  8. 8. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Asst. Curator Historian Publicist Critic Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Collaborate with the Assistant Curator and find out which works of art will be on display in the exhibit. Imagine you have been given an advance tour of the gallery. Write a review of your visit for a local magazine, including a full critique (describe-interpret-judge) for ONE work of art you saw. * Worldwide Arts Resources * ”How to Write a Critique”
  9. 9. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Evaluations will be based on teamwork, participation, and individual products. Ask your teacher to see the expectations rubric for your role. Example: “Artist Introduction” Brochure—Art historian rubric CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Content All facts in the brochure are accurate. The brochure gives important basic information about the artist and history, and includes more than one "interesting fact." 99-90% of the facts in the brochure are accurate. The brochure gives basic information about the artist and history, and included one "interesting fact." 89-80% of the facts in the brochure are accurate. Only basic artist and history facts were included. Fewer than 80% of the facts in the brochure are accurate. Some information was missing. Attractiveness & Organization The brochure has exceptionally attractive formatting and well-organized information. The brochure has attractive formatting and well-organized information. The brochure has well-organized information. The brochure's formatting and organization of material are confusing to the reader. Spelling & Proofreading No spelling or grammatical errors. Only one or two spelling or grammatical errors. Several spelling or grammatical errors. Numerous errors become a distraction and make the brochure difficult to read. Teamwork/Participation Student was involved in the selection of the artist and helped facilitate a group discussion. Student was involved with the selection of artist and engaged in group discussions. Student was somewhat involved in the choce of artist, and spoke once or twice during a group discussion. Student did not seem engaged or interested in the group tasks, and did not speak during discussions.
  10. 10. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! Thanks to your efforts, your little museum is back on the map, and people across the state are talking about your Abstract Expressionist gallery! While the exhibit you designed goes on tour, you need something to fill the empty gallery space…It’s time for you to create some art! Painting by Mark Rothko; Photo by Flickr: John Gevers
  11. 11. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Flickr —Photo resources The WebQuest Page --Information and inspiration for WebQuest design The WebQuest Slideshare Group –easy resource for WebQuest publishing and sharing Links used in the Quest: ArtLex ArtCyclopedia ArtChive Worldwide Arts Resources ArtNet Artist Index The Artists Stanklos.com Ibiblio Webmuseum Themes in American Art—Abstraction ”How to Write a Critique”
  12. 12. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for advanced high school artists Designed by Elizabeth Hamilton [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  13. 13. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest was designed as a project for EDUC331, an educational technology and assessment course at Colorado State University. As a future art educator, I wanted to make a research quest with an art history slant, which could easily lead into a studio art production assignment. In my experience, high school artists tend to be skeptical about abstract art, so this lesson was designed to help them explore and discover the themes and ideas that drove a major American movement toward abstraction and “action” art. Ideally, this lesson will be followed by an opportunity for students to create their own abstract art. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  14. 14. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This project is intended for high school art students taking more advanced painting or drawing electives. The activity will incorporate elements of art history and culture, aesthetics, and criticism by introducing students to themes and movements that have shaped art in the United States, and asking them to discuss works by American artists using the elements and principles of art and design. The students should have some background in American and art history, and should be familiar with the requirements of a written critique. (I use the three paragraph, describe-interpret-evaluate format.) Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  15. 15. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson touches on nearly all of the Colorado state educational standards for art: *Standard 1—Students recognize the visual arts as a form of communication. *interpreting and distinguishing intended meanings of visual images, themes, and ideas in works of art; *Standard 2—Students know elements of art, principles of design, and sensory and expressive features of visual arts *comparing and contrasting elements of art, principles of design, sensory and expressive features, and functions of art *Standard 4—Students relate the visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions. *evaluating, analyzing, and interpreting works of art as related to the history and culture of various people. *describing the functions, meanings, and significance of works of art within various cultures; *Standard 5—Students analyze and evaluate the characteristics, merits, and meaning of works of art. *interpreting meaning in works of art *evaluating works of art using critical analysis and aesthetic inquiry *demonstrating the ability to form and defend appropriate judgments. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  16. 16. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion This lesson should only take up two or three class periods, depending on the type of schedule your school operates on. Ideally, one class period would be used for the introduction and research, and the next classes for the creation of final products. The lesson could be further extended if you wish to give the students part of the class period to work on individual art. If several groups are engaging in the same webquest, further engage student interest by making it a contest! Assume that they all work for ‘rival’ museums, and that only one pitched exhibition will receive the grant in question. Assemble a group of judges—teachers and students from other classes—to evaluate the final products and decide on a winner.
  17. 17. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion All of the specific web resources used in the quest are outlined in the Credits and References section—slides 11 and 20. However, given the student-directed nature of topic selection in the Quest, not all of these links are guaranteed to be useful for everyone. Have art history books with quality images on hand, and allow students to look over analog materials in the school media center if they can’t find what they are looking for in the provided links. If your school allows it, and if you are confident in the maturity of your students, encourage them to perform their own web searches to find information and images.
  18. 18. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Because the slide format and long rubrics do not mesh particularly well, only one sample evaluation rubric was included in the webquest. If you are considering using this lesson, e-mail me (elizabeth.hamilton@colostate.edu), and I will happily provide the complete evaluation section formatted for Microsoft Excel.
  19. 19. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion By completing this webquest, students have received a multidisciplinary introduction to the evolution of abstract art in their own country. Now that they have explored the aesthetics, purposes, and criticism of abstract art from a historical perspective, they should be comfortable applying some element of abstraction in their own artwork. Follow the Webquest up with an art production assignment that gives them the opportunity!
  20. 20. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Flickr —Photo resources The WebQuest Page --Information and inspiration for WebQuest design The WebQuest Slideshare Group –easy resource for WebQuest publishing and sharing ArtLex ArtCyclopedia ArtChive Worldwide Arts Resources ArtNet Artist Index The Artists Stanklos.com Ibiblio Webmuseum Themes in American Art—Abstraction ”How to Write a Critique” Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Links used in the Quest:

×