Introduction to Fronts

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This short Presentation will give you an Introduction to Fronts

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Introduction to Fronts

  1. 1. Cold Front• A Cold Front is usually known for creating Thunderstorms. What it does is it takes over the Warm Air Mass by pushing it. The Cold Front is like a bulge, because of this it makes Warm Air violently Rush up into the Atmosphere thus creating Clouds then Instability, then Rain. However sometimes there is a Dry Cold Front which has no Moisture thus creating no Rain. After a Cold Front passes Temperature are likely to Cool Down! The Diagram next is a Perfect example of a Cold Front!
  2. 2. Warm Front• A Warm Front is like a Cold Front but the Warm Air is Pushing the Cold Air. However a Warm Front pushes the Warm Air up on a Slope to the Atmosphere. Usually a few days before a Warm Front you will see High Cirrus Clouds then you will start to get thicker & lower clouds as time passes by. Warm Fronts are known for creating just rain events or just Scattered Showers in Areas. The Diagram next is a Perfect example of a Warm Front!
  3. 3. Stationary Fronts• A Stationary Front is interesting because it is the Front that creates a Low Pressure System. You have Warm air moving to the East while you have Cool air moving to the West. Due to this it creates a Counter-Clockwise Rotation creating a Surface or Upper Level Low which creates Cold Front & Warm Fronts. It is the main function in the Cycle of the Low Pressure Systems. The Diagram next is a Perfect example of a Stationary Front!
  4. 4. Occluded Front• An Occluded Front shows Weakening in a Low Pressure System. It is when a Cold Front catches up to a Warm Front. Basically it is a Cold Front & a Warm Front Combined! The Diagram next is a Perfect example of a Occluded Front!

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