Oportunidades para Brillar: Presentaciones en público

893 views

Published on

José Palomares estuvo con nosotros conversando sobre las oportunidades que tenemos para destacar en las presentaciones que realizamos. Aquí algunas claves para lograrlo exitosamente.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

Oportunidades para Brillar: Presentaciones en público

  1. 1. http://josemariapalomares.blogspot.com@chemapalomares
  2. 2. DELIVERINGPOWERFULPRESENTATIONS AN APPROACH TO SUCCESSFUL COMMUNICATION JOSÉ MARÍA PALOMARES
  3. 3. • Have you ever thought how  many presentations like yours  has your customer / colleague /  boss… attended?
  4. 4. Why do wemake a presentation?
  5. 5. To inform?To convince?To motivate? Yes, of course,To persuade?To influence? but…
  6. 6. …at the endwe make a presentation to sell an idea
  7. 7. “Communication is about getting othersto adopt your point of view, to help themunderstand why you are excited. If all youwant to do is create a file of facts and figures, then cancel the meeting and sendin a report”.  “The presentation is to make anemotional sale”Seth Godin, author of Really bad powerpoint
  8. 8. BAD PRESENTATIONSBAD COMMUNICATION LESS EFFECTIVENESS LESS SALES
  9. 9. 1. MESSAGE2. AUDIENCE3. TECHNIQUES4. RECOMMENDATIONS5. DON’T DO6. INSPIRATION’S SOURCES
  10. 10. What is the most important ingredientof a successful presentation?
  11. 11. The slides?The speaker? The data?
  12. 12. The main idea
  13. 13. What is my absolutely central point?
  14. 14. Can you pass the elevator test?
  15. 15. Two basic types of key message: – Informative: if you want to inform your audience,  then your key message is the most important idea you  want them to remember – Persuasive: if you want to persuade them, then your  key message is the action you want them to take.
  16. 16. Express your idea in one clear and succinct sentence. Everything else in your presentation will support your key  message
  17. 17. • The idea includes the main purpose of our speech and  the feeling we want to cause on the audience.  »Relevant, interesting and meaningful »Simple »Easy  »Concrete »Credible »Well structured
  18. 18. • Set the idea• Create a headline that sets the direction  for your presentation. • Give the audience a reason to listen.• Make your theme clear and consistent
  19. 19. Show the main idea up front. “Today I want to show you howthe new distribution strategy will give younew business opportunities in your area”
  20. 20. If you can’t explain it simply,you don’t understand it well enough.Albert Einstein
  21. 21. Simplicity is the ultimate sophisticationLeonardo da Vinci
  22. 22. • Define a limited  number of key  ideas.• The audience has a  fish memory
  23. 23. • Make sure your information is  clear, well organized and easy  to follow• Create a table of contents
  24. 24. • Make numbers and statistics meaningful and memorable. If Facebook were a country, it would be the 3rd in terms of population after China  and India, and before USA
  25. 25. 5 Gb or1,000 songs in your pocket?
  26. 26. • Concentrate in the relevant information.  • Do not ramble on about  irrelevant stuff or precedents“The secret of being a bore is to tell everything” Voltaire.
  27. 27. • Talk in terms of benefits for the  audience
  28. 28. • Only facts and figures that support your  message.  • Reliable sources and testable credentials
  29. 29. MAKE IT SHORT Studies show that listeners  loose attention after  approximately 20 minutes.http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/content/7-ways-audience-attention-presentation/
  30. 30. Welcome and thank youKey message (headline / main purpose)Define the problemBenefits of solving the problemProposed solutionReinforce key messageConclusion & next steps (call to action)
  31. 31. What do you have to know about your audience?
  32. 32. • Number• Language• Background• Attitude• Expectations• Who is who
  33. 33. …and remember who you are for them!• Your role: expert, leader, provider, client, boss, etc.• Your reputation (and your company’s)
  34. 34. So yo must…• addapt your language and your style• decide if interaction is good  (it doesn’t always work)• give the right information (quantity & quality)
  35. 35. • Storytelling• Anecdotes and personal  experiences• Repetition• Quotes and testimonials• Body language
  36. 36. • Original way to transmit  knowledge to the next  generation.• Proven method to  communicate effectively  and to gain empathy. Martin Luther King said ‘I have a dream,’ not• A way to engage, move  ‘I have a strategy and  a vision’. and inspire the audience. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oXtd_XRb3U
  37. 37. • including personal  experiences and turning  dry statistics and numbers  into a compelling plot line  can truly move an  audience Obama includes many personal experiences in  his speeches to support his message and to   persuade his audience. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOR3n68Qf2w
  38. 38. • Repetition guarantees your message is internalized.• You can say the same thing in many different ways.• Use this tecnique for the core message or for a very  difficult concept. 
  39. 39. “Less is more” Van Der Rohe (1886‐1969), arquitect & designer• Reinforce your message and add credibility
  40. 40. “Let your customers, your distributors, opinion leaders, etc. explain how good you are and reinforce your message!”
  41. 41. • 93 % communication   is non verbal**Prof. A. Mehrabian: 7% of information isgiven by words, 38% by the voice and55% by body language
  42. 42. • Kind attitude: smiling is free!• Eye contact• High energy: show enthusiasm and  energy.
  43. 43. • Dress code: “You never get a second chance to make the first impression”
  44. 44. • Be natural: move around, walk, use  your hands…• Do not hide behind the podium• Be aware of mannerisms (hand movements, use of “ums” “ahs”….)
  45. 45. • Use your sense of  humour (unless you don’t have it!)• Positive emotions help you to engage your audience http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html
  46. 46. • Don’t turn your back to the audience• Try not to interfere with the projection
  47. 47. Great presenters like Steve Jobs visualize, plan and create ideas on paper before they open the presentation software.
  48. 48. • 1/3 thinking and scripting• 1/3 building slides• 1/3 rehearsing
  49. 49. • Take a pencil and a piece of  paper before you open your  laptop.• Take your time. Good  preparation is 80% of success.• Avoid “cut and paste”
  50. 50. • Not too fast (particularly important in an  international meeting or when explaining  difficult concepts)• Try to vary your pace, volume, tone,  emphasis… ie: key ideas or conclusions  remarks are best presented at a slower  rythm.
  51. 51. The right word may be effective, but no word was ever as effective as a rightly timed pause.Mark Twain
  52. 52. • Choose an adequate font  (easy to read and  understand.• Just one or two!
  53. 53. ARIAL: stable, conformistTAHOMA: young, plainCENTURY GOTHIC: happy, elegantGEORGIA: formal, practicalTIMES NEW ROMAN: professional, traditionalCOURIER: plainVERDANA: professional, coolCALIBRI: elegant, professional
  54. 54. ALGERIANBICKHAMBLACKADDERBRUSH SCRIPTECCENTRICFREESTYLEGIDDYUPLUCIDAMAGNETO
  55. 55. • Adequate font size (min.  28pt) and colours that  contrast with the  background.
  56. 56. Remark only what it is REALLY “REMARKABLE”
  57. 57. Dark background Light background• Formal • Informal• Doesn’t influence ambient  • Bright feeling lighting • Illuminates the room• Does not work well for  • For small venues handouts• For large venues
  58. 58. • No animations• No dissolves, spins or other  transitions.• Avoid sound effects… if they don’t add any value
  59. 59. • Only relevant  information: headlines.
  60. 60. • No ‘teleprompting’• No bullet pointing
  61. 61. • Make it visual! No more  than 1 or 2 images.• Make them meaningful!
  62. 62. PICTURE SUPERIORITY EFFECT
  63. 63. PICTURE SUPERIORITY EFFECT
  64. 64. • Use professional images.
  65. 65. • Do not manipulate images.
  66. 66. • Do not manipulate images.
  67. 67. • Respect your audience:  make good use of time.  Timing your sessions: 80%  rule.
  68. 68. • The moment (before/after  the break, the first/the last,  etc)
  69. 69. • Preview questions (FAQ) and  write assertions (complete  sentences which expresses the  answer to each question in a  clear a succinct manner)
  70. 70. • If you don’t know the answer, let  it know.• Avoid conflicts• The question is for you. The  answer is for all. 
  71. 71. • Repeat the question: • to make sure you have  understood  it  • to gain time to answer • to reformulate it in a more  convenient way for you
  72. 72. • Nothing gives you more  selfconfidence than  rehearsing
  73. 73. • Spend time to practice• An opportunity to adjust  ideas, times and  transitions.• Practice the complete  presentation (including  paces, silences, body  language, etc) ideally in  the same place where it  is going to be held.
  74. 74. • Find an audience for  your rehearsal (friend,  mate, etc) and get  his/her feedback.“Nothing clarifies ideas so much as explaining them to other people”.Vernon Booth (Author of “Communicating in Science”)
  75. 75. For two full days before a presentation, Jobs rehearsed the entire presentation, asking for feedback from his team. For 48 hours, all of his energy is directed at making the presentation the perfect embodiment of Apple’s messages. 
  76. 76. If  I can do it,why don’t you do it?
  77. 77. • Arrive with time to solve any  possible problems.• Check tech questions  (laptop, projector, software  releases, usb, microphone,  etc)
  78. 78. • Moderator: how to be  presented. Brief of your  presentation.• Attend to the previous  presentations to check  audience’s mood. 
  79. 79. Read from slidesAvoid eye contactInappropriate dress codeTurn your back to the audienceMannerismsMake a presentation without previous rehearsal
  80. 80. • PHOTOXPRESS  (http://www.photoxpress.com/)• COMPFIGHT  (http://www.compfight.com/)• GOOGLE IMAGES   (http://images.google.com/)
  81. 81. • iSTOCKPHOTO  (http://www.istockphoto.com/)• SHUTTERSTOCK  (http://www.shutterstock.com/)• FOTOLIA               (http://en.fotolia.com/)• DREAMSTIME  (http://www.dreamstime.com/)• GETTYIMAGES  (http://www.gettyimages.com/)
  82. 82. • This is a challenge that  recquires time and  effort so…• Choose your battle!
  83. 83. A person can have the greatest idea in the world.   But if that person can’t convince enough other  people,  it doesn’t matter. –Gregory Berns
  84. 84. Who you want to be?
  85. 85. http://josemariapalomares.blogspot.com@chemapalomares
  86. 86. DELIVERINGPOWERFULPRESENTATIONS AN APPROACH TO SUCCESSFUL COMMUNICATION JOSÉ MARÍA PALOMARES

×