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eCompliance, Cameron Freese_Measuring and Communicating Safety Performance

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Performance can be measured in many ways, but the
choice of which metrics and how to communicate these
effectively across the organization, play an important
role in establishing a strong safety culture and overall
management system. Explore how Aecon uses leading
and lagging indicators across their business to identify
themes or trends and take action.

Published in: Leadership & Management
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eCompliance, Cameron Freese_Measuring and Communicating Safety Performance

  1. 1. Safety Matters … Most AECON OVERVIEW2012 MEASURING & COMMUNICATING WORKPLACE SAFETY PERFORMANCE 1
  2. 2. Safety Matters … Most Measuring & Communicating • Two key elements of an H&S Management System • These elements must be linked, but can be successful or fail on their own MEASURING AND COMMUNICATING WORKPLACE SAFETY PERFORMANCE 2
  3. 3. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING WORKPLACE H&S PERFORMANCE 3
  4. 4. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING PERFORMANCE • Have a clear view of performance: Past vs Future • Identify strengths and weaknesses in the H&S Management System • Identify where you can use resources • Measurement can provide an opportunity to prevent future H&S incidents • Provide comparison to industry performance • Required to track based on jurisdiction • Must provide to clients during prequalification processes Why measure safety performance? 4
  5. 5. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING PERFORMANCE Safety performance is typically measured using two primary categories: 1. Lagging / trailing indicators 2. Leading indicators 5
  6. 6. Safety Matters … Most LAGGING INDICATORS 6
  7. 7. Safety Matters … Most LAGGING INDICATORS • Traditional process of incident counts and frequencies • Establish KPI’s, targets and a benchmark • Provide a historical perspective on what HAS happened • Shows trending of performance over a period of time 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Industry LTIFrequency(3.02 average) Aecon LTIFrequency(0.00 average) 7
  8. 8. Safety Matters … Most LAGGING INDICATORS • What is currently used in the industry? – USA = BLS OSHA 300 log – International = Country dependent, OSHA 300 log, Britain HSE RIDDOR – Canada? What are the best Indicators to use? 8
  9. 9. Safety Matters … Most LAGGING INDICATORS Canadian Standards –What are they? • Provincial WCB standards • No national standard used to classify injuries • The standards used to measure will depend on the company tracking them and the region or industry in which they work 9
  10. 10. Safety Matters … Most LAGGING INDICATORS BLSOSHA 300 Classifications Canadian WCB classifications •Fatality •LostTime Injury •Restricted Work •Medical Aid •Occupational Illness •First Aid •Fatality •Occupational Illness •Lost Time Injury •MedicalAid (accepted WCB claim) Are these classifications the same? 10
  11. 11. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS • Lost Time Injury Frequency (LTIF) • Non-Lost Time Injury Frequency (NLTI) – Actual vs WCB approach • Total Recordable Injury Frequency / Rate (TRIF/ TRIR) • Days Away and Restricted or Transferred (DART) • Severity Rate 11
  12. 12. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS • Frequencies are based on hours to provide an “apples to apples” perspective • Common base frequencies are 200K and 1M hours • Frequency = # X base / actual hours worked Common Metrics LTI Frequency TRIF / TRIR NLTI DART SEVERITY 12
  13. 13. Safety Matters … Most Common Classifications Fatality Lost Time Injuries (LTI) Days Lost due to LTI Restricted Work Days restricted or transferred Medical Aid First Aid METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS Common Metrics LTI Frequency TRIF / TRIR NLTI DART SEVERITY 13
  14. 14. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS Which ones are the best to measure? The answer is completely based on your company and will depend on: – Company size – Risk of work performed – Number and severity of workplace incidents – Industry of work performed – Static vs dynamic work environment 14
  15. 15. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS The lagging metrics look at different severity and frequency of events. Eventually one metric will plateau and no longer provide you great value as a measurement for improvement. 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Industry LTIFrequency(3.02 average) Aecon LTIFrequency(0.00 average) 15
  16. 16. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS Focus on the metrics and frequencies that allow you to drive continuous improvement. NLTI –Includes all First Aids and Medical Aids
  17. 17. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS • Lagging metrics are based on outcomes • Measurement of lagging data should include trends in causal factors based on the incidents that occurred – Example: You may have fifteen Medical Aids, all from different types of work –you need to make the data relative to your system and H&S elements – Focus on what is causing these incidents, not the outcome 17
  18. 18. Safety Matters … Most METRICS BASED ON LAGGING INDICATORS • Lagging indicators are events that occurred and lessons can be learned • Your investigation will identify root causes that are the targets for your corrective actions • Trending the root causes can help identify systemic H&S management concerns vs surface level underlying causes – Example: If you know the root cause is primarily: • Worker Competency: Focus on training, verification, coaching and monitoring • Equipment Selection: Procurement practices, selection and availability • Poor planning or hazard identification: Review how hazards are assessed, controlled and communicated 18
  19. 19. Safety Matters … Most LEADING INDICATORS 19
  20. 20. Safety Matters … Most LEADING INDICATORS • Focused on proactive and preventativeindicators • Establishes a true “Leading Indicator” as to future safety performance • Qualitative data or activities that need interpretation 20
  21. 21. Safety Matters … Most LEADING INDICATORS Examples of Leading Indicators • Training • Inspections • Audits • BehaviouralObservation programs • Safety Opportunities –Near Misses reported • Risk / Hazard assessments completed 21
  22. 22. Safety Matters … Most LEADING INDICATORS Measure leading indicators by: • Tracking the activities completed • Reviewing the amount completed vs expected or required • Examine the details from the completion of those activities (i.e. inspections results) 22
  23. 23. Safety Matters … Most LEADING INDICATORS 23
  24. 24. Safety Matters … Most COMMUNCIATING H&S PERFORMANCE 24
  25. 25. Safety Matters … Most COMMUNICATING PERFORMANCE Most organizations are currently communicating H&S performance in one form or another. Common points of communication of H&S performance: • Weekly, monthly, quarterly or annual review meetings • JHSC meetings • Tool Box Talks • Through the use of KPI reports or dashboards 25
  26. 26. Safety Matters … Most COMMUNICATING PERFORMANCE Communicating safety performance must be done to: • Inform all workplace parties of current success and opportunities for improvement • Engage those who are responsible and accountable for H&S –Sr. Management • Engage those who will actually perform the work 26
  27. 27. Safety Matters … Most COMMUNICATING PERFORMANCE Communicating performance means communicating: • The company and H&S program expectations • The importance of H&S and how the program elements contribute to its success • Soliciting input, not just providing the output • Frequent updates to success and opportunities for improvement 27
  28. 28. Safety Matters … Most COMMUNICATING PERFORMANCE Utilize standardized reports that communicate key leading and lagging indicator information. 28
  29. 29. Safety Matters … Most PROGRAM ALIGNMENT 29
  30. 30. Safety Matters … Most H&S PROGRAM ALIGNMENT Aligning the concepts of H&S measurement and communication will build the foundation of continuous improvement. Focus on consistent concepts and categories through all phases of your program Planning -Risk /Hazard Assessments Monitoring -Inspections / Audits -BehaviouralPrograms Investigation -Injury -Damage -Environmental Consistent & Measureable indicators at each step to help drive educated H&S improvements 30
  31. 31. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING THE OUTCOME Typical reactive or trailing indicator process: Incident counts and frequencies Causal Factors 31
  32. 32. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING THE OUTCOME Proactive or leading process: 32
  33. 33. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING THE OUTCOME How do you know your proactive or leading activities are working? If your program is aligned, you can measure consistent and relative information from your leading and trailing indicators to validate your performance. 33
  34. 34. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING THE OUTCOME Aeconhas focused on engaging our workforce to report all Safety Opportunities (SO); regardless of severity. Category of Opportunity Most Common Second Most Common Environment Housekeeping (52%) Weather -rain, ice, snow (24%) Hardware / Tools & Equipment Defective or failed (49%) Inadequate tool for job (34%) People Failure to follow practice / procedure (50%) Worker inattention (37%) Process/Procedures Hazard not identified by signage or barriers (46%) Procedure unclear or no instruction (37%) Other Third Party such as public or other contractor (47%) Vehicleuse –Employee driving error (12%) Data based on approx 6800 reported SO’s 34
  35. 35. Safety Matters … Most MEASURING THE OUTCOME Safety Opportunity causal factors compared to actual incident causal factors: Safety Opportunities Incidents 35
  36. 36. Safety Matters … Most SUMMARY 36
  37. 37. Safety Matters … Most SUMMARY Measurement • Measure what is relative to your company • Measure what can drive continuous improvement • Align you measurement process throughout your entire H&S Management System Communication • Communicate your expectations and process during initial training • Use the information you measure frequently and consistently in meetings, tool box talks, training etc. • Engage and empower the people that will ultimately improve your safety performance through understanding of your metrics 37
  38. 38. 38 THANK YOU

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