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Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run [Book Summary]

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Serverless Toronto User Group received this gift from Wietse Venema – the author of the *first-ever* Cloud Run book, as a bonus after our Fireside-style chat meetup "Cloud Run: where Serverless meets Containers" with Kubernetes god Kelsey Hightower: https://youtu.be/fE_Njcc3Lus

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Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run [Book Summary]

  1. 1. Google Cloud Run lets you deploy your containerized application on a highly scalable serverless platform. Learn how to make the most of the platform in this new book. The print edition will become available in mid- to late December. Pre-order today to make sure you get your copy in time for the holiday break. Subscribe to O'Reilly Online Learning to read the ebook. Chapter Outline: Learn more ☛
  2. 2. Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 1 gives a general overview of what a serverless application is and introduces you to Google Cloud and its serverless products, without going into too much depth. If you are new to building serverless applications on Google Cloud, this will be a great introduction. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  3. 3. Chapter 2: Understanding Cloud Run This chapter is a hands-on introduction to Cloud Run. I show you how to get started with Google Cloud and deploy your first Cloud Run service. Once you’ve experienced its look and feel, I’ll explain the runtime characteristics of Cloud Run that influence the way you build your application, as well as the other serverless runtimes on Google Cloud: App Engine and Cloud Functions. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  4. 4. Chapter 3: Building Containers In this chapter you’ll find a thorough introduction to application development with containers. I’ll show you how to run containers on your local machine with Docker and create your own container images (with and without Docker), and I’ll dive into the fundamentals of containers. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  5. 5. Chapter 4: Working with a Relational Database Even an application on a hyper-scalable serverless container platform needs data in order to be interesting. I’ll show you how to connect with Cloud SQL (managed relational databases such as MySQL and PostgreSQL), and how to keep Cloud SQL running when your application scales to 1,000 containers. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  6. 6. Chapter 5: Working With HTTP Sessions In this chapter, I’ll show you how to persist data in Redis, using the managed product Memorystore on Google Cloud. Memorystore only has a private IP. You’ll discover how to connect to any private IP in your Google Cloud project from Cloud Run, using VPC Connector. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  7. 7. Chapter 6: Service Identity and Authentication Especially if you are building a more serious application, you’ll want to make sure that every Cloud Run service in your system has only the permissions to do exactly what it needs to do. I’ll introduce you to Cloud Identity and Access Management (IAM) in chapter 6. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  8. 8. Chapter 7: Task Scheduling Most applications need to schedule tasks to be executed later. On a traditional server, you handle tasks by spawning a background thread or scheduling a cron job, but these approaches are not compatible with serverless environments like Cloud Run. In this chapter, I’ll show you how to handle task scheduling in Cloud Run. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  9. 9. Chapter 8: Infrastructure as Code using Terraform If you are working together with a team to build an application, or if you want to set up reproducible environments, you might be tempted to set everything up using one-off commands or scripts. However, doing so can lead you into problems. This is why I cover Infrastructure as Code using Terraform; it lets you can recreate your entire project using a single command. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  10. 10. Chapter 9: Structured Logging and Tracing Getting logging right is fundamentally important when you run a system in production. I’ll show you how to add request and trace context to your logs, as well as additional metadata. If you get this right from the start, you’ll have an easier time debugging problems in production. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  11. 11. Chapter 10: Cloud Run and Knative Serving In the last chapter of the book, I move beyond day-to-day concerns and think about the future. If you build your application on top of a vendor-controlled platform, you should consider the risk of vendor lock-in. Cloud Run is API-compatible with the open source product Knative Serving, but what does that mean in practice? I’ll show you with a hands-on example. Building Serverless Applications with Google Cloud Run - Pre-order today - © 2020 O'Reilly Media, Inc - Author Wietse Venema
  12. 12. Wietse Venema is a software engineer. If he's not training teams to build scalable and reliable software, he's figuring out how things work so he can be a better engineer and teacher. He's proud to be the name twin (not family) of the famous Wietse Venema, who wrote Postfix. About the Author

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