Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Revolution Knowledge Presentation - April 3 2013

309 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Revolution Knowledge Presentation - April 3 2013

  1. 1. New Trends in Education:Digital Tools andTechnologies forTodays Learners Deone Zell Deone Zell, Ph.D. CSUN
  2. 2. Something is happening…. Today’s Students • Digital nativesTechnology Trends CSUN Activities• Then and now • Lecture capture• Screens and devices • Flipping the classroom• Horizon Report • eTexts• Down the line • Tablets • Content creation
  3. 3. Who Are Our Students?Baby Boomers - born 1946-64 • Now age 49-67Gen Y - born 1965 - 1981 • Now age 32-48Millennials - born 1982 - 2000 CSUN average 24 • Now age 15-31iGen - born 2001 - 2013 • Now age 14 and under
  4. 4. Digital Natives In a land of Grew up with technology Facebook, YouTube, Hulu, Twitter Smartphones and tablets Retrieve information fast Digital Immigrants (anyone over 30) Parallel process and multi-task  Born before the introduction of Prefer graphics before text digital technology Prefer random access (hypertext)  Use Function best when networked radio, television, newspapers, bo oks, magazines Thrive on instant gratification and frequent rewards  Prefer long-form writing  Prefer email to texting Prefer texting to email  Adopted PCs and laptops  They are adaptingSource: Marc Prensky, Marc Prensky, Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, On the Horizon, 2001
  5. 5. Digital natives grew up on social media
  6. 6. So what has changed(for us digital immigrants)?
  7. 7. User InterfacesSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  8. 8. Where’s the nearest Thai restaurant?
  9. 9. MagazinesSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  10. 10. DevicesSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  11. 11. Books THEN NOW Paper based / Singular copy Electronic / Syncable / Multiple devicesSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  12. 12. CommunicationsSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  13. 13. PhotographySource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  14. 14. NavigatingSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  15. 15. Hearing NewsSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  16. 16. Note TakingSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  17. 17. File Storage Box /Source: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  18. 18. Cash RegistersSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  19. 19. SignaturesSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  20. 20. Health AwarenessSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  21. 21. Door LocksSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  22. 22. ThermostatsSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  23. 23. KnowledgeSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  24. 24. EducationSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  25. 25. Learning From learning by listening to learning by doing Education could become as fun as videogamesSource: Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers
  26. 26. What about those screens and devices?
  27. 27. “Young Americans from the ages of 8 to 18 spend more than 7 ½ h a day on average using a smart phone, computer, television or other electronic device.” Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/20/education/20wired.htmlSource: http://services.google.com/fh/files/misc/multiscreenworld_final.pdf. Market research conducted by Ipsos and Sterling Brands in partnership with Google
  28. 28. Source: http://services.google.com/fh/files/misc/multiscreenworld_final.pdf. Market research conducted by Ipsos and Sterling Brands in partnership with Google
  29. 29. Source: http://services.google.com/fh/files/misc/multiscreenworld_final.pdf. Market research conducted by Ipsos and Sterling Brands in partnership with Google
  30. 30. Advantage of a handy device – Waiting is dead “Found time” = micromoments in which things get done
  31. 31. Horizon Report Short List 2013
  32. 32. Flipped classroomSource: http://theactiveclass.com/2011/04/29/flipping-your-classroom/
  33. 33. MOOCs
  34. 34. Source: Sloan Consortium, 2012 Survey of Online Learning
  35. 35. Dig beneath the statistics
  36. 36. Mobile Apps
  37. 37. Apps that call a ride for you
  38. 38. Apps that measures your mood
  39. 39. Learner Analyticshttp://www.elearnspace.org/blog/2010/08/25/what-are-learning-analytics/
  40. 40. Social Reading
  41. 41. Gamification
  42. 42. Tablet Computing • 36% of US population owns a tablet in 2013 • Up 177% over last year • In 2012, 25% of students owned a tablet • 7 in 10 high school seniors believe tablets will replace textbooks within 5 yrsSource: Deloitte’s 2013 State of the Media and Democracy SurveySource: http://goo.gl/uO25g, March 14, 2012
  43. 43. Smartphone and Tablet Shipments Exceed PCs in Q4 10
  44. 44. Smartphone + Tablet Installed Base Should Exceed PC Installed Base in 2013
  45. 45. iPad = 48% of American Kids want one for Christmas while 36% want a mini
  46. 46. A little further down the road…
  47. 47. Emotional Avatars“Carla” “Zoe” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0mWUdBEF5o
  48. 48. Google Glass
  49. 49. Google Glass
  50. 50. Faster than gravity
  51. 51. Snapping a picture on the Charlie Rose show mid-interview
  52. 52. What are our faculty doing?
  53. 53. Faculty are capturing their lectures
  54. 54. Faculty are capturing their lectures …even outside the classroom!
  55. 55. Faculty are flipping the classroom
  56. 56. Faculty are adopting eTexts http://youtu.be/jIQ4uJKGWCE
  57. 57. Faculty are creating born digital textbooks
  58. 58. IMG_0025.jpg
  59. 59. Faculty are creating born digital courses
  60. 60. Faculty are adopting tablets Textbook replacement Internet resources CSUN resources (Moodle, lecture capture) Discipline-specific apps Clicker Digital whiteboard Lecture capture PDF reader and annotater Screensharing and collaboration Mobile data entry Multimedia creation Drawing and taking notes
  61. 61. Faculty are teaching with tablets in journalism
  62. 62. Faculty are teaching with tablets in the sciences
  63. 63. Faculty are teaching students how to edit video on devices
  64. 64. Faculty are using avatars to teach
  65. 65. (each avatar has their own personality)
  66. 66. Faculty are encouraging student-generated content in class
  67. 67. Faculty are creating animations
  68. 68. Faculty are creating multimedia http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDPsZPKSEFg
  69. 69. What can we conclude?
  70. 70. Conclusions• Technology is changing the way we work, play, learn• Students are asking for multimedia and mobility• Advantages of hyperconnectivitiy outweigh drawbacks• New role for higher education – teach digital literacy• Average person can produce, not just consume!• Transformation has just begun….
  71. 71. Experts abound with predictions and explanations“The smartest person in the room is the room itself”(David Weinberger, Too Big to Know, 2012, Basic Books, p. xiii)“It’s not information overload. It’s filter failure.”(Clay Shirky, keynote address at Web2.0 Expo, September 16-19, 2001) “…attention, participation, collaboration, the critical consumption of information (aka “crap detection”), and network smarts.” (Howard Reingold, Net Smart: How to Thrive Online, MIT Press, 2012, p. 5)
  72. 72. The “Gutenberg Parenthesis” 1,400 2,000 “containment”

×