Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The digital transformation of education

2,278 views

Published on

Why has education not yet benefited from the gains that ICT have provoked in other systems?

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

The digital transformation of education

  1. 1. THE DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF EDUCATION Dirk Van Damme OECD/EDU/IMEP
  2. 2. WHY HAS EDUCATION NOT YET BENEFITTED FROM THE PRODUCTIVITY AND EFFICIENCY GAINS THAT ICT HAVE PROVOKED IN OTHER SYSTEMS? 2
  3. 3. Technology in education: a history of self-proclaimed ‘revolutions’, naïve expectations and many failures
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5 Technology is changing: • Skills demand • Educational delivery
  6. 6. WITH REGARD TO HARDWARE AND CONNECTIVITY, EDUCATION IS CATCHING UP 6
  7. 7. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Japan NewZealand Portugal Netherlands Spain Australia Belgium Germany United… Switzerland Italy Poland Hungary France Ireland UnitedStates Austria Canada Sweden Korea Norway Finland OECD… Slovenia Luxembourg Denmark Iceland Chile Czech… Turkey Greece Israel Mexico Estonia Slovak… Adequate instructional materials (e.g. textbooks) Adequate computer software for instruction Adequate Internet connectivity New technologies and instructional resources are increasingly present in schools School principals reports on the adequacy of resources to support student learning in their schools % of students Source: PISA 2012 7
  8. 8. Number of computers at school per student (PISA 2015, school principal reports) 0.75 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 1.60 8
  9. 9. DOES MORE COMPUTERS AT SCHOOL MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN LEARNING OUTCOMES? 9
  10. 10. More computers at school is negatively related to evolution of math performance 10
  11. 11. Change in the science score per unit increase in the number of computers per student after accounting for students' and schools' socio-economic profile (PISA 2015) -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 Austria Israel Mexico Estonia SlovakRepublic Denmark Poland CzechRepublic France Spain Switzerland Germany Iceland Australia Finland Chile Hungary Japan Luxembourg Turkey NewZealand Belgium UnitedStates Slovenia Portugal OECDaverage Sweden Canada Latvia UnitedKingdom Norway Italy Ireland Netherlands 11
  12. 12. Performance in reading, by index of computer use in school 12
  13. 13. WHAT ARE THE BARRIERS? 13
  14. 14. Fig II.3.3Teachers' needs for professional development 0 10 20 30 40 Knowledge of the curriculum Knowledge of the subject field(s) School management and administration Pedagogical competencies Developing competencies for future work Teaching cross-curricular skills Student evaluation and assessment practice Student career guidance and counselling Approaches to individualised learning Teaching in a multicultural or multilingual setting Student behaviour and classroom management New technologies in the workplace ICT skills for teaching Teaching students with special needs Slovak Republic Average Percentage of lower secondary teachers indicating they have a high level of need for professional development in the following areas Barriers: teachers need high professional skills TALIS 2013 14
  15. 15. 15 Percentage of teachers with good ICT problem- solving skills, compared with selected industries
  16. 16. 41.738.99 100 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80 100 Poland Ireland Slovak Republic Estonia Korea United States Austria Czech Republic Average Flanders (Belgium) Japan England/N. Ireland (UK) Germany Canada Australia Denmark Norway Netherlands Finland Sweden Level 2 Level 3 Young adults (16-24 year-olds) All adults (16-65 year-olds) 16 Barriers: general low proficiency in problem solving skills in technology-rich environments %
  17. 17. 17 ‘Digital natives’: a misleading myth
  18. 18. Task-oriented browsing capabilities of 15 year-old students (PISA 2012 database) 18
  19. 19. Barriers: divergent profiles of students with regard to Internet use OECD (2012) Data Italy, 2008 19
  20. 20. Percentage of individuals who judge their computer skills would be sufficient if they were to apply for a new job within a year, 2013 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 % All Individuals Individuals with high formal education Individuals with no or low formal education Source: OECD computations based on Eurostat, Information Society Statistics, May 2014 20
  21. 21. SOME TENTATIVE CONCLUSIONS 21
  22. 22. • Education is a heavily personalised service, so productivity gains through technology are limited, especially in the teaching & learning process • Impact of technology on educational delivery remains sub-optimal – Over-estimation of digital skills among teachers AND students – Naïve, hardware-focused policy and implementation strategies – Resistance of teachers AND students – Lack of understanding of pedagogy and instructional design – Low quality of educational software and courseware Some conclusions 22
  23. 23. • Investments and strategies should focus on: – Teachers’ digital skills, pedagogical knowledge and higher-level instructional skills – teacher professional development – Well-targeted usage of ICT in those parts of the teaching & learning process where they make a difference – Development of specific and well-adjusted pedagogies • Experiential learning (e.g. remote and virtual labs, project-based and enquiry-based pedagogies) • Hands-on pedagogies (e.g. game development) • Cooperative learning (e.g. local and global collaboration) • Interactive and metacognitive pedagogies (e.g. real-time assessment) Some conclusions 23
  24. 24. • Some new developments seem to be promising: – Highly interactive, non-linear courseware, based on state- of-the-art instructional design – Sophisticated software for experimentation, simulation – Social media to support learning communities and communities of practice among teachers – Use of gaming in instruction Some conclusions 24
  25. 25. • Need for a platform to connect education sector with education industry to discuss educational innovation and transformation: Global Education Industry Summit – Helsinki 2015 – Jerusalem 2016 – Luxembourg 2017 – Tallinn 2018 Some conclusions 25
  26. 26. Thank you ! dirk.vandamme@oecd.org www.oecd.org/edu/ceri twitter @VanDammeEDU 26

×