2012 Most Endangered   Historic Places
Introduction•   The Arizona Preservation Foundation is releasing its 2012 list of Arizonas 25 most    endangered historic ...
Changes from Previous Lists•   Five buildings on previous lists were destroyed: the 1962 Valley National Bank    "Gold Dom...
Adamsville RuinsAdamsville is a large Classic Hohokam habitationsite, dating from AD 1100 to AD 1450, consisting ofa platf...
Arizona State ParksOur Arizona State Parks are in trouble. Theeconomic downturn and tight state budget led theState Legisl...
Basque Pelota Ball CourtBasque Pelota is a handball-like game originatingon the borders of Spain and France. When Basquesi...
Broadway BoulevardBroadway was born modern. The boulevardexpressed the new American optimism and post-wareconomic boom. Li...
Buckhorn BathsIn 1939, Ted and Alice Sliger established the bathsunknowing that their efforts to make a living of thenatur...
Camp NacoThis adobe compound was between 1919 and1923, as part of the U.S. War Departments MexicanBorder Defense construct...
Copper Miner MonumentIn 1935, at the height of the Great Depression,renowned artist Raymond Sanderson created astunning ar...
David & Gladys Wright House When it learned in May 2012 that the David & Gladys Wright House in Phoenix’s Arcadia neighbor...
Empire RanchLocated in the 42,000-acre Las Cienegas NationalConservation Area and listed on the NationalRegister of Histor...
First Baptist ChurchThis church was completed in 1930 to serveparishioners in central Phoenix before suburbanexpansion aft...
Fisher Memorial HouseThis Casa Grande house was built in 1927 andlisted on the National Register of Historic Places in1985...
Geronimo StationLocated between Safford and Globe on thewestbound side of Interstate 70 is a small store, gasstation, and ...
Glendale Tract Community CenterThe Glendale Tract Community Center, listed on theNational Register of Historic Places, is ...
Gonzales Martinez HouseThe modest vernacular Gonzales Martinez House isone of only two buildings from Tempe’s formativefir...
J.N. Denier Tenement HouseThe 1888 J. N. Denier Tenement House is locatedacross the street from the Second Pinal CountyCou...
Maple Ash NeighborhoodThe Maple Ash Neighborhood consists of threesubdivisions, the largest concentration of historicresou...
Marist CollegeThe three-story, Marist College was built in 1915 byManual Flores, a Tucson contractor. A component ofthe do...
Meehan/Gaar HouseBuilt in 1903 and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, this Casa Grande house is anunusual ...
Mesa Citrus Growers                   Association BuildingThe 1935 citrus packinghouse is located at thesouthwest corner o...
Mountain View                   Colored Officers ClubHigh on a hill overlooking Fort Huachuca Army basein Sierra Vista sit...
Peter T. Robinson HouseA 1905 brick cottage with Neo-Classical influencelisted on the National Register of Historic Places...
Sage Memorial Hospital School          of NursingThe Ganado Mission was established in 1901 by thePresbytery of Arizona th...
San Ysidro Ranch RuinsListed on the National Register of Historic Places,the San Ysidro Hacienda was the home of JoseMaria...
Sun Mercantile BuildingDesigned by E.W. Bacon and constructed by Wells& Son, the 1929 Sun Mercantile Building is the first...
White Gates HousePerhaps the first residential design by architect AlBeadle, the White Gates House was probablyinfluenced ...
About the Foundation•   The Arizona Preservation Foundation is Arizonas nonprofit statewide    historic preservation organ...
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2012 Arizona Most Endangered Historic Places

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The Arizona Preservation Foundation is releasing its 2012 list of Arizona's 25 most endangered historic places. Compiled by preservation professionals and historians, the list identifies critically endangered cultural resources of major historical significance to the state.

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2012 Arizona Most Endangered Historic Places

  1. 1. 2012 Most Endangered Historic Places
  2. 2. Introduction• The Arizona Preservation Foundation is releasing its 2012 list of Arizonas 25 most endangered historic places. Compiled by preservation professionals and historians, the list identifies critically endangered cultural resources of major historical significance to the state.• "Each of the places we have named is an important historic site, but unfortunately is in grave danger of collapse, demolition, or destruction," said Jim McPherson, Arizona Preservation Foundation Board President. “As our Centennial year draws to a close – the perfect time to reflect on our state’s past, present, and future – it is crucial that residents, private interests, and government officials act now to save these elements of our cultural heritage before it is too late.”• Historian Vince Murray of Prescott and architect Philip Reina of Glendale co-chaired the Foundations initiative to investigate the status of each entry and determine what should be dropped off, what should remain and why, and what should be added.
  3. 3. Changes from Previous Lists• Five buildings on previous lists were destroyed: the 1962 Valley National Bank "Gold Dome" branch was demolished in 2007 by Arizona State University, the 1913 Havasu Hotel in Seligman was demolished in 2008 by the BSNF Railway Company, the 1921-22 Mohave County Hospital was demolished in 2008 by the County, the 1939 Southern Pacific Railroad Depot in Casa Grande suffered significant damage from suspected arson in 2009, and the 1928 Eastman Cotton Gin was demolished by the Town of Buckeye in 2012.• On the positive side, six historic sites were removed from previous lists because significant progress was made to ensure their preservation: Desert Laboratory on Tumamoc Hill in Tucson, Kerr Cultural Center in Scottsdale, Mesa Grande Platform Mound Ruins in Mesa, Old U.S. Highway 80 Bridge between Buckeye and Gila Bend, Second Pinal County Courthouse in Florence, and Valley National Bank (now Chase Bank) at 44th Street & Camelback Road in Phoenix.
  4. 4. Adamsville RuinsAdamsville is a large Classic Hohokam habitationsite, dating from AD 1100 to AD 1450, consisting ofa platform, mound, at least one compound, a ballcourt, and 41 associated mounds of which some still Photo: University of Arizona Libraryhave standing architecture. Listed on the NationalRegister of Historic Places, it is located near the19th century town for which it is named. It is thesecond largest Hohokam housing area along theCanal Casa Grande, second only to thecombined communities of Grewe and Casa Grande.The current size of the site is 155 acres of which126 acres are proposed for addition to Casa GrandeNational Monument. The site is threatened byencroachment from commercial development andthe State of Arizona is not able to provide adequateprotection.
  5. 5. Arizona State ParksOur Arizona State Parks are in trouble. Theeconomic downturn and tight state budget led theState Legislature to strip out and redirect most StateParks funding. Some Parks have closed. Others areon the list for closure. Dedicated and experiencedemployees have been laid off and Heritage Fundgrants were eradicated. Elimination of the voter- Photo: Arizona State Parksapproved Arizona State Parks Heritage Fund inFY2010 caused a $10 million permanent annualrevenue reduction and removed the last source ofParks’ capital and maintenance funding. This alsoremoved all matching funding for historicpreservation projects as well as all local, regional,and state park enhancements & trailsimprovements. It is urged that the Governor andState Legislature consider a fully operational StateParks system and additional funds obtained throughsupplemental and sustainable funding sources.
  6. 6. Basque Pelota Ball CourtBasque Pelota is a handball-like game originatingon the borders of Spain and France. When Basquesimmigrated to America in the 1800s, they broughttheir sport with them. Approximately two dozenPelota ball courts exist in the U.S. Of that, a dozenor so remain west of the Mississippi and only oneremains in Arizona. Currently, there are issues overhow the site in Flagstaff can be and should be Photo: Patty Rubick Luttrelldeveloped. Though the owners would like topreserve the property and city officials haveproposed several scenarios for preservation, theirefforts at reuse on the site have been fraught withproblems outside of their control.
  7. 7. Broadway BoulevardBroadway was born modern. The boulevardexpressed the new American optimism and post-wareconomic boom. Like many cities, Tucson wasgrowing rapidly. In 1940, the population was 35,000;by 1960, it soared to 212,000. As an importantsuburban corridor, modern structures were builtalong its edge to support new neighborhoods with Photo: Jude Ignacio & Gerardine Vargastheir curved streets and rambling ranch houses.Broadway was a reflection of the American Dream.The Regional Transportation Authority funding,approved by Pima County voters on May 16, 2006,included plans for significant expansion of Tucson’smid‑century modern Broadway Boulevard. Thescope expands the road from 4 to 8 lanes andthreatens 127 significant and National Registereligible properties and the small businesses theyhouse.
  8. 8. Buckhorn BathsIn 1939, Ted and Alice Sliger established the bathsunknowing that their efforts to make a living of thenatural mineral waters would help to establish Mesaand the East Salt River Valley as a mecca forprofessional baseball. In 1947, the New York Giants Photo: Mesa Preservation Foundationmade the Buckhorn Baths their spring training homeand continued to do so for 25-plus years. Ty Cobb,Leo Durocher, Willie Mays, Gaylord Perry, andothers were regular guests. The Sligers establisheda post office, bus stop, water hole, museum, andmotel, which they operated for 65-plus years. Alsoknown as the Buckhorn Mineral Wells and WildlifeMuseum, the latter moniker due to an immensetaxidermy collection, the baths have been closed foryears. Listed on the National Register of HistoricPlaces, the location of the Buckhorn Baths makes ita prime target for development, and speculation isrampant that this part of Mesa and Arizona historycould be lost.
  9. 9. Camp NacoThis adobe compound was between 1919 and1923, as part of the U.S. War Departments MexicanBorder Defense construction project -- a plan tobuild a 1,200-mile barrier along the border. After thecamp closed, the Civilian Conservation Corps usedthe complex in the 1930s for staging projects in Photo: Arizona Public Mediasoutheast Arizona. Over the next several decades,the property owners used the structures as rentalhousing. Now owned by the Town of Huachuca City,the property has been heavily degraded due toneglect. Many of the adobe structures are erodedfrom exposure to the elements. The roof of one ofthe barracks has caved in, and other buildingsmerely ruins. In May 2006, arson destroyed four ofthe non-commissioned officer buildings anddamaged the roof of a fifth. Unchecked vegetation isthreatening the foundation of buildings andincreasing the danger of fire.
  10. 10. Copper Miner MonumentIn 1935, at the height of the Great Depression,renowned artist Raymond Sanderson created astunning art deco sculpture dedicated to the “virilemen, the copper miners.” Produced under theWorks Project Administration, the monumentsurvives today as a unique icon to Bisbee and asignificant piece of American art. While thesculpture appears to be in good structural condition,localized areas of fine cracking appear near thebase and deep cracking across the legs at theknees and ankles. The City of Bisbee fears thatwithout preservation and restoration funds, the Photo: Arizona Odditiesstatue may fall into ruin and a unique form ofartwork lost.
  11. 11. David & Gladys Wright House When it learned in May 2012 that the David & Gladys Wright House in Phoenix’s Arcadia neighborhood had been purchased by developers who had indicated their intent to bulldoze the structure and build two “luxury homes,” the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy requested the City of Phoenix to grant historic preservation and landmark designation to the house. A number of local, state, and national organizations endorsed the Photo: Scott Jarson Conservancy’s appeal. The City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Commission, Camelback East Village Planning Committee, and Planning Commission have recommended landmark status to the Phoenix City Council. A new (anonymous) buyer has stated his intent to restore and preserve the property, but the sale has not been completed.
  12. 12. Empire RanchLocated in the 42,000-acre Las Cienegas NationalConservation Area and listed on the NationalRegister of Historic Places, Empire Ranch traces itshistory to the 1870s, when a 160-acre quartersection homestead was bought by Walter Vail andHerbert Hilsop. At the time, the ranch house was a Photo: Empire Ranch Foundationfour-room adobe, with a zaguan (breezeway) thatpassed between the rooms into the corral. By theturn of the 20th Century, the ranch covered almost amillion acres and the house had grown to 22 rooms.The Vail family lived there until the 1920s, whenEdward Boice of the Chiricahua Cattle Co. boughtand then ranched the property until the 1970s. In1988, the BLM bought the property through a public-private land swap and designated the ranch landsas a natural conservation area, which it remainstoday. The Empire Ranch Foundation has worked topreserve the ranch house and outbuildings,including emergency repairs and stabilization.
  13. 13. First Baptist ChurchThis church was completed in 1930 to serveparishioners in central Phoenix before suburbanexpansion after World War II. The four-story buildingincludes a roof-top garden, concrete and woodfloors, diamond-patterned clerestory windows,Italian gothic motifs, three-pointed arch doorways,decorative cornices, stone columns, and a belltower. While saved from demolition in 1992 fromprevious fire damage and despite the best intentions Photo: Natascha Paytonof its current owner, the building continues to laydormant.
  14. 14. Fisher Memorial HouseThis Casa Grande house was built in 1927 andlisted on the National Register of Historic Places in1985. When listed, it was considered an outstandingexample of a Period Revival residential andcommercial building executed in local material ofuncoursed fieldstone construction. The house iscurrently in a significant state of disrepair. Somewindows and doors are missing or damaged and theroof is leaking, which can cause structural damage. Photo: Marge Jantz
  15. 15. Geronimo StationLocated between Safford and Globe on thewestbound side of Interstate 70 is a small store, gasstation, and four-casita motel (complete withcarports between the units). Constructed of adobein the 1930s and 1940s to accommodate travelersheading west, it is one of the few original buildingsstill standing in the state-registered historic town-siteof Geronimo. The property is in poor condition andis deteriorating from neglect. Photo: Kurt Wenner
  16. 16. Glendale Tract Community CenterThe Glendale Tract Community Center, listed on theNational Register of Historic Places, is a 1,900square foot adobe structure built in 1937. The socialhall served the surrounding residential subdivisiondeveloped by the Resettlement Administration, aNew Deal agency. The 24-home subdivision wascreated as part of a plan to relocate displacedfarmers and unemployed urban workers to planned,part-time subsistence farm projects where theycould grow their own crops. The current historic Photo: Ronald Shortdistrict consists of 13 of the original houses and thecommunity center, all of which are rare examples ofNew Deal programs. While the City of Glendale hasrejected initial plans to demolish certain buildings, itis only because the City will not allow more than fiveresidences to be built. The owner needs eight tomake their project viable, but if they can make duewith a smaller number of residences, there is little tostop the demolition.
  17. 17. Gonzales Martinez HouseThe modest vernacular Gonzales Martinez House isone of only two buildings from Tempe’s formativefirst decade, constructed by Ramon Gonzales in1880 of locally-produced adobe. In 1892, JesusMartinez purchased the property in whose family itmiraculously remained for more than 90 years.Given all the changes that have occurred in andaround downtown Tempe, it is surprising that thestructure has survived. The reason may have moreto do with a long-standing property dispute onlyrecently resolved between the City, State, andrailroad. Without intervention, the house will most Photo: City of Tempelikely be lost to inner city decline. The entire site isof sufficient size to be used for high-densitydevelopment.
  18. 18. J.N. Denier Tenement HouseThe 1888 J. N. Denier Tenement House is locatedacross the street from the Second Pinal CountyCourthouse. This flat-roofed Sonoran row houseretains much of its original fabric and has not beensubjected to excessive remodeling. An Anglo-Stylehalf-hipped roof was added between 1898 and1911. Several original canales (rain spouts)designed to drain the building’s original earth roof Photo: Bonnie Bariolastill project from the upper part of the south adobewall just underneath the deep curved overhangingeaves of the “new” shingled roof above. Accordingto the SHPO there are components found in noother building in the state of Arizona. Constructiondocuments were prepared utilizing Arizona StateParks Heritage Funds, but once the Heritage Fundwas defunded by the State Legislature no furtherwork was performed. The building is in serious needof rehabilitation.
  19. 19. Maple Ash NeighborhoodThe Maple Ash Neighborhood consists of threesubdivisions, the largest concentration of historicresources in Tempe. The Gage Addition, Park Tract,and College View subdivisions are significant as oneof Tempe’s oldest surviving neighborhoods. Thearea is adjacent to downtown Tempe, Arizona StateUniversity, and Tempe St. Lukes Hospital, each ofwhich have exerted pressure on the neighborhoodat various times in the past. While the City Historic Photo: City of TempePreservation Commission and Office and a majorityof the neighborhood’s historic home owners wouldlike to have a historic district zoning overlay placedon the neighborhood, the property is zoned multi-family and many owners would prefer to developtheir properties. Without some kind of protections,preservation advocates see the historic character ofthe neighborhood, and with it any potentialdesignation to the National Register of HistoricPlaces, in jeopardy.
  20. 20. Marist CollegeThe three-story, Marist College was built in 1915 byManual Flores, a Tucson contractor. A component ofthe downtown precinct of the Diocese of Tucson,the school provided a Catholic education for boysfrom elementary school to high school sophomoreyear. It was an educational facility until 1968, whenit became office space for the Diocese of Tucson. Ithas been vacant since 2002. Marist College isthreatened by structural destabilization caused bythe collapse of two corners and the cracking of athird. This deterioration is due to water penetrationthat comes from leaks in the roof and from thescupper and downspout drainage system. A re- Photo: Eric Vondyplastering 30 years ago with a plasticized compositestucco (Tuff-Tex) has cracked and spalled, allowingwater to penetrate the walls but preventing theadobe from drying. Emergency bracing hastemporarily stabilized the building, but there is aclear and present danger of collapse if a permanentsolution is not implemented.
  21. 21. Meehan/Gaar HouseBuilt in 1903 and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, this Casa Grande house is anunusual example of the Colonial Revival influenceexecuted in adobe. The structure is also significantfor its association with two of Casa Grandes well-known citizens: Tom J. Meehan who built the house,owned Gilt Edge Saloon, and served on the CasaGrande Board of Trade; and Fanne Gaar who Photo: Marge Jantzserved on the City Council and was the first womanto be elected mayor of an Arizona city. TheMeehan/Gaar House is currently in a state ofdisrepair with deteriorating veranda, roofing, andadobe walls.
  22. 22. Mesa Citrus Growers Association BuildingThe 1935 citrus packinghouse is located at thesouthwest corner of Mesa’s town center atBroadway and Country Club. Adjacent to therailroad, its output was easily shipped. The complexrepresents the heyday of Valley agriculture,particularly citrus growing. With citrus acreagerapidly being replaced by new development, thepackinghouse now is the last example of the once Photo: East Valley Tribunepowerful citrus industry in metro Phoenix. Withpacking operations suspended in June 2010, thesite has been put up for sale, thereby placing thestructures at risk for clearing and new development.
  23. 23. Mountain View Colored Officers ClubHigh on a hill overlooking Fort Huachuca Army basein Sierra Vista sits a dilapidated building that onceechoed with the sublime song stylings of LenaHorne during World War II. She came to entertainthe black troops at the Mountain View ColoredOfficers Club, built in 1942 by the then-segregatedArmy for its growing number of colored soldiers. A Photo: Parade Magazineplan to preserve that building and turn it into anAfrican-American military research center is on thedrawing board, but an estimated $3 million isneeded to save and convert the club.
  24. 24. Peter T. Robinson HouseA 1905 brick cottage with Neo-Classical influencelisted on the National Register of Historic Places.Peter T. Robinson was a prominent local attorney,active in Yuma community affairs. The house isvacant and is broken into regularly. The roof is opento the sky, the floor is caving in, and a small firedestroyed the eastern portico and some of the roofover the kitchen. Photo: Vincent Murray
  25. 25. Sage Memorial Hospital School of NursingThe Ganado Mission was established in 1901 by thePresbytery of Arizona through the Board of HomeMissions. A decade later, the board approved atwelve bed hospital at Ganado. This was the firstnon-governmental funded hospital on an Indianreservation in the U.S. About 60 buildings were built Photo: National Park Servicebefore 1957, including the 1903 manse, 1911 AdobeWest, 1920 Dining Hall (one of the oldest andlargest two-story adobes in the U.S), and 1929Almira College. The Sage Memorial Hospital Schoolof Nursing was the first accredited nursing trainingprogram in the U.S. for Native American women.Over the last 35 years, drainage problems havedetrimentally affected the foundations of some ofthe structures due to uncontrolled runoff and soilexpansion. Unabated, the differential settlementmay cause the foundations to shift and thestructures to fail.
  26. 26. San Ysidro Ranch RuinsListed on the National Register of Historic Places,the San Ysidro Hacienda was the home of JoseMaria Redondo, an early Arizona pioneer. The ranchonce contained over 2,000 acres, but subsequent tothe death of Redondo in 1878, his family could notmake a claim to more than 160 under Americanhomestead laws; not enough land to support thehaciendas extensive agricultural operations and itquickly fell into ruin. The site once contained the Photo: Yuma Sunadobe ruins of the main ranch house, a two-storymill, and rubble mounds; the original headquartersincluded a cane mill, numerous storehouses,workhouses, stables, carriage house, harnesshouse; and houses for approximately 100 laborersfamilies built outside the walls of the headquarters.Named for the patron saint of agriculture, it was thefirst large non-Indian irrigated farm in Arizona with27 miles of canals and ditches bringing water fromGila River. Recent development has encroached onthe site and the ruins are now at risk.
  27. 27. Sun Mercantile BuildingDesigned by E.W. Bacon and constructed by Wells& Son, the 1929 Sun Mercantile Building is the firstand only known warehouse built and owned by aChinese-born businessman in Phoenix (TangShing). It is the last remaining building of the city’ssecond Chinatown. Developers of a hotel and condoproject want to insert an 11-story tower inside thewalls of this city-owned structure, listed on both the Photo: Steve DreiseszunNational Register of Historic Places and PhoenixHistoric Property Register. After the Phoenix CityCouncils unanimous vote on December 14, 2005 toallow the "facadomy," the Save Sun Merc Coalition,Arizona Preservation Foundation, and twelve othergroups filed an appeal in Maricopa County SuperiorCourt and received a favorable ruling from thejudge.
  28. 28. White Gates HousePerhaps the first residential design by architect AlBeadle, the White Gates House was probablyinfluenced by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s 1951Farnsworth House. Previous owners gutted theinterior and scraped the landscape from theproperty. Eligible for the National Register of HistoricPlaces, the house sits vacant. Homes in theneighborhood sell in the seven figures and theproperty is valuable for redevelopment. If action isnot taken soon, the owner may be required by theCity to demolish the house and sell the property. Photo: David Cook
  29. 29. About the Foundation• The Arizona Preservation Foundation is Arizonas nonprofit statewide historic preservation organization. Founded in 1979, the Foundation is dedicated to preserving Arizonas historic, archaeological, architectural, and cultural resources.• The Foundation offers a variety of services and programs, including: Arizona Historic Preservation Conference, Governors Heritage Preservation Awards; Speakers Bureau, Preservation Resource List, and Arizonas Most Endangered Places List.• The Foundation encourages feedback on the endangered places list and what might be added in the future. If you have updates or ideas to share, call 602-258-1920 or email info@azpreservation.org For more information about the Foundation, visit azpreservation.org or its Facebook page.

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