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Translations of Petrarch’s Italiansonnet Rime 140.1. Thomas Wyatt2. Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
A little bit of information aboutFrancesco Petrarca (1304-1374)• The Italian poet Francesco Petrarca (Petrarch) was an old...
Perhaps the finest of Petrarchs works are hissonnets, which appear in a collection called simply the"Rime" (two syllables ...
• Because Italian is a language extremely rich in rhymingpossibilities, this is not especially hard to achieve. You will n...
Wyatt & Surrey translate Petrarch’ssonnets• Following is a sonnet of Petrarch (#140) which foundfavour with two rough cont...
A literal (and crass) translation…Amor, che nel penser mio vive et regnae l suo seggio maggior nel mio cor tene,talor arma...
Now consider Wyatt’s & Howard’stranslationsSir Thomas Wyatt Henry Howard, Earl of SurreyThe long love that in my thought d...
Sir Thomas WyattThe long love that in my thought doth harbor,And in mine heart doth keep his residence,Into my face presse...
Henry Howard, Earl of Surreyarms heraldic insignia (shield of protection)eke alsoshamefast shamefacedremove I.e. by others...
Writing TaskRe-read these poems closely: figure out whichone you like best and why?• Explore the figures in the poem - dis...
Courtly LoveCourtly love was a medieval European conception of nobly and chivalrously expressinglove and admiration. Gener...
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Petrarch, Wyatt and the Earl of Surrey

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Petrarch, Wyatt and the Earl of Surrey

  1. 1. Translations of Petrarch’s Italiansonnet Rime 140.1. Thomas Wyatt2. Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
  2. 2. A little bit of information aboutFrancesco Petrarca (1304-1374)• The Italian poet Francesco Petrarca (Petrarch) was an oldercontemporary of Geoffrey Chaucer.• His life was shaped by: the forces of the rising Italian renaissance the growth of humanism and the Black Plague of 1348-50, which carried off the great lyricallove of his life, Laura.• The bulk of his poetry is addressed to an idealized Laura; it is bothan outgrowth of mediaeval traditions of so-called "courtly love" andsomething that hearkens back to the lyric poetry of the ancientworld. Petrarch has been considered in many ways to be the literaryfather of the Italian renaissance, as Giotto was its artistic father; hespent many years of his life recovering and collecting the works ofancient Latin authors, both the poets and Cicero.
  3. 3. Perhaps the finest of Petrarchs works are hissonnets, which appear in a collection called simply the"Rime" (two syllables -- its Italian).Amor, che nel penser mio vive et regnae l suo seggio maggior nel mio cor tene,talor armato ne la fronte vene;ivi si loca et ivi pon sua insegna.Quella chamare e sofferir ne nsegna,e vol chel gran desio, laccesa spene,ragion, vergogna, e reverenza affrene,di nostro ardir fra se stessa si sdegna.Onde Amor paventoso fugge al core,lasciando ogni sua impresa, et piange et trema;ivi sasconde et non appar piu fore.Che possio far, temendo il mio signore,se non star seco infin a lora estrema?che bel fin fa chi ben amando more.
  4. 4. • Because Italian is a language extremely rich in rhymingpossibilities, this is not especially hard to achieve. You will note therepetition of common end sounds (especially in -a) that this allowshere. English, on the other hand, is a very rhyme-poorlanguage, and bringing the sonnet form into English was a constantchallenge for the poets who took it up. Variant forms of the sonnetappeared almost immediately, but the best known was surely theShakespearean sonnet.• The difference in structure was also reflected in the content of theShakespearean sonnet, which tends to "break" between the bodyand the last two lines, rather than between the octave and thesestet. Nevertheless, this was a long time in coming, and poets didnot in fact abandon other options for some time.
  5. 5. Wyatt & Surrey translate Petrarch’ssonnets• Following is a sonnet of Petrarch (#140) which foundfavour with two rough contemporaries during the reignof Henry VIII. I have placed alongside it a literal butrather boring and un-poetic translation.• Both Wyatt and Surrey were courtiers of someprominence, and their fates illustrate theprecariousness of life under Henry: of the two, Wyattwas constantly in trouble, and may have beenimplicated in the problems with Henrys secondwife, Anne Boleyn; Henry Howard, the son of the Dukeof Norfolk who was Thomas Mores former ally, wasexecuted at a very young age (mere days beforeHenrys death) on a charge of treason.
  6. 6. A literal (and crass) translation…Amor, che nel penser mio vive et regnae l suo seggio maggior nel mio cor tene,talor armato ne la fronte vene;ivi si loca et ivi pon sua insegna.Quella chamare e sofferir ne nsegna,e vol chel gran desio, laccesa spene,ragion, vergogna, e reverenza affrene,di nostro ardir fra se stessa si sdegna.Onde Amor paventoso fugge al core,lasciando ogni sua impresa, et piange ettrema;ivi sasconde et non appar piu fore.Che possio far, temendo il mio signore,se non star seco infin a lora estrema?che bel fin fa chi ben amando more.Love, who lives and rules in my thoughtand holds his chief seat in my heart,sometimes armed comes into my face;and there makes camp and places his banner.She who teaches me to love and suffer,and wants reason, shame, and respect restrainmy great desire and burning hopetakes offense inwardly at our ardor.Therefore Love, fearful, flees to the heart,abandoning it all, and cries and shakes;he hides himself, and is seen abroad no more.What can I do, when my master is afraid,except stand with him to the bitter end?He makes a fine end, who dies loving well!
  7. 7. Now consider Wyatt’s & Howard’stranslationsSir Thomas Wyatt Henry Howard, Earl of SurreyThe long love that in my thought doth harbor,And in mine heart doth keep his residence,Into my face presseth with bold pretenseAnd therein campeth, spreading his banner.She that me learneth to love and sufferAnd will that my trust and lusts negligenceBe reined by reason, shame, and reverenceWith his hardiness taketh displeasure.Wherewithal unto the hearts forest he fleeth,Leaving his enterprise with pain and cry,And there him hideth, and not appeareth.What may I do, when my master feareth,But in the field with him to live and die?For good is the life ending faithfully.Love, that doth reign and live within my thought,And built his seat within my captive breast,Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought,Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.But she that taught me love and suffer pain,My doubtful hope and eke my hot desireWith shamefast look to shadow and refrain,Her smiling grace converteth straight to ire.And coward Love, then, to the heart apaceTaketh his flight, where he doth lurk and plain,His purpose lost, and dare not show his face.For my lords guilt thus faultless bide I pain,Yet from my lord shall not my foot remove:Sweet is the death that taketh end by love.
  8. 8. Sir Thomas WyattThe long love that in my thought doth harbor,And in mine heart doth keep his residence,Into my face presseth with bold pretenseAnd therein campeth, spreading his banner.She that me learneth to love and sufferAnd will that my trust and lusts negligenceBe reined by reason, shame, and reverenceWith his hardiness taketh displeasure.Wherewithal unto the hearts forest he fleeth,Leaving his enterprise with pain and cry,And there him hideth, and not appeareth.What may I do, when my master feareth,But in the field with him to live and die?For good is the life ending faithfully.‘spreading his banner’ Raising the flag i.e.taking up a position for battle and,figuratively, blushing.‘Be reined ‘ Checked; with a probable pun on“reigned”‘the hearts’ With a pun on “heart” and“hart” (as deer)Renaissance commentators on Petrarchmaintained that the deer in Caesar’s royalforest wore collars bearing a similarinscription, to prevent anyone from huntingthe animals. The allusion raises questionsabout Wyatt’s relation to King Henry VIII.
  9. 9. Henry Howard, Earl of Surreyarms heraldic insignia (shield of protection)eke alsoshamefast shamefacedremove I.e. by others disdain (as in line 4,of others’ “envy”)Love, that doth reign and live within my thought,And built his seat within my captive breast,Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought,Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.But she that taught me love and suffer pain,My doubtful hope and eke my hot desireWith shamefast look to shadow and refrain,Her smiling grace converteth straight to ire.And coward Love, then, to the heart apaceTaketh his flight, where he doth lurk and plain,His purpose lost, and dare not show his face.For my lords guilt thus faultless bide I pain,Yet from my lord shall not my foot remove:Sweet is the death that taketh end by love.
  10. 10. Writing TaskRe-read these poems closely: figure out whichone you like best and why?• Explore the figures in the poem - discuss• Explain the use of metaphor
  11. 11. Courtly LoveCourtly love was a medieval European conception of nobly and chivalrously expressinglove and admiration. Generally, courtly love was secret and between members of thenobility. It was also generally not practiced between husband and wife.Courtly love began in the ducal and princely courts ofAquitaine, Provence, Champagne, ducal Burgundy and the Norman Kingdom of Sicily atthe end of the eleventh century. In essence, courtly love was an experience betweenerotic desire and spiritual attainment that now seems contradictory as "a love at onceillicit and morally elevating, passionate and disciplined, humiliating and exalting, humanand transcendent".http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/sechard/344love.htmReturn to ‘About Petrarch Slide’

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