Learning Materials - Film Elements

5,057 views

Published on

0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,057
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
214
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
122
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Use this image at the beginning of the Romeo and Julietunit.
  • Production Elements are the elements of film that make-up HOW the story is told. It is through these features (e.g. Lighting, Camera Placement etc.) that a director conveys meaning. These devices often provide more information about characters and the world within the film.
  • Learning Materials - Film Elements

    1. 1. LearningMaterials – FilmAnalysis UNIT
    2. 2. Table of Contents:LEARNING MATERIALS1. What are narrative elements?2. Discussion points: narrative elements in Vincent (1982).3. What are mise-en-scene elements?4. Discussion points: German Expressionist mise-en-scene elements in Vincent(1982).5. What cinematic styles and genres referenced in Vincent (1982)?o German Expressionism (artistic style)o German Expressionist elements in filmo Examples of German Expressionist filmso Gothic-horror poetry and narrativeso Gothic art (symbolism)o Gothic-horror visual themes (motifs)
    3. 3. NARRATIVEELEMENTS• Genre• Character• Themes• Setting• Narrative• Point of view
    4. 4. GENREFrench word meaning “kind” or“sort”Genres are formed by conventionsand sought to categorise artisticworksClick here to returnto NarrativeElements slide
    5. 5. THEMEA unifying or dominant idea centralto a textIn moving text (film) theme issometimes conveyed through visualmotifsClick here toreturn toNarrativeElements slide
    6. 6. CHARACTERCharacter: a person in the story who has certain characteristics.Some characters might be:• central to the story’s action like a protagonist and orantagonist• and some may be static - no change ordevelopment by the end of the story).Click here toreturn toNarrativeElements slide
    7. 7. SETTINGSetting is a geographic location inwhich a story takes place, andhelps create the main backdropand mood for the story.Click here to returnto NarrativeElements slide
    8. 8. NARRATIVEDerives from the Latin verb narrare whichmeans “to tell”A spoken or written account of connectedevents; a story.Click here toreturn toNarrativeElements slide
    9. 9. POVPoint of ViewIn film, point-of-view refers narrativepoint-of-view, which determinesthrough whose perspective the storyis viewed.Click here toreturn toNarrativeElements slide
    10. 10. Key aspects of mise-en-sceneDécorLightingCostumeSpace
    11. 11. Key aspects of mise-en-sceneDécorAn important element of ‘putting in the scene’ is décor, the placement ofobjects and the setting of a scene. Décor can be used to amplify character,emotion or the dominant mood of a film.
    12. 12. Key aspects of mise-en-sceneLightingThe intensity, direction and quality of lightinghave a profound effect on the way an image isperceived. Light affects the way colours arerendered, both in terms of hue and depth, andcan focus attention on particular elements ofthe composition.
    13. 13. Key aspects of mise-en-sceneSpaceThe representation of space affects the readingof a film. Depth, proximity, size andproportions of the places and objects in a filmcan be manipulated through camera placementand lens, lighting and décor, effectivelydetermining mood or relations betweenelements in the
    14. 14. Key aspects of mise-en-sceneCostumeCostume simply refers to the clothes thatcharacters wear. Using certain colours ordesigns, costume is used in narrative cinema tosignify characters or make clear distinctionsbetween characters.
    15. 15. Mise-en-scene and GermanExpressionismFormal elements of German Expressionist filmsAccording to Nancy West from the University of Missouri,Columbia, the formal elements of German Expressionist filminclude, but are not limited to, the following:• Chiaroscuro lighting: lighting that employs extremecontrasts of light and dark, thus creating dramatic shadows• a preoccupation with mirrors, glass, and other reflectivesurfaces• the use of anthropomorphism, which is the attribution of ahuman form, human characteristics, or human behaviour tonon-human things• an interest in abstractionism, which is a style of art thatprivileges internal form over pictorial representation
    16. 16. Lighting in expressionist filmsExpressionist films use simple lighting from thefront and sides, illuminating the scene flatly andevenly to stress the links between the figuresand the décor. In some notable cases, shadowsare used to create additional distortion (seechiaroscuro lighting). ---Bordwell and Thompson
    17. 17. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmChiaroscuro lightinglighting that employsextreme contrasts oflight and dark, thuscreating dramaticshadows
    18. 18. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmChiaroscuro lightinglighting that employsextreme contrasts of lightand dark, thus creatingdramatic shadows
    19. 19. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmChiaroscuro lightinglighting that employs extremecontrasts of light and dark, thuscreating dramatic shadows
    20. 20. A preoccupationwith mirrors, glass,and other reflectivesurfacesFormal Elements of German Expressionist FilmPreoccupation withreflective surfaces
    21. 21. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmPreoccupation with reflectivesurfaces
    22. 22. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmPreoccupation with reflectivesurfacesA preoccupation withmirrors, glass, andother reflectivesurfaces
    23. 23. The use ofanthropomorphismanthropomorphismis the attribution of ahuman form, humancharacteristics, orhuman behaviour tonon-human thingsFormal Elements of German Expressionist FilmAnthropomorphism
    24. 24. The use ofanthropomorphismanthropomorphismis the attribution of ahuman form, humancharacteristics, orhuman behaviour tonon-human thingsFormal Elements of German Expressionist FilmAnthropomorphism
    25. 25. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmAnthropomorphismThe use ofanthropomorphismanthropomorphismis the attribution of ahuman form, humancharacteristics, orhuman behaviour tonon-human things
    26. 26. Formal Elements of German Expressionist FilmAnthropomorphismThe use ofanthropomorphismanthropomorphismis the attribution of ahuman form, humancharacteristics, orhuman behaviour tonon-human things
    27. 27. Glossary of termsmise-en-sceneFrench word meaning “placing on stage” or “put inthe scene”When applied to the cinema, mise-en-scène refers to everything thatappears before the camera and its arrangement—composition, sets,props, actors, costumes, sounds, and lighting.The “mise-en-scène”, along with the editing of a film, influence therealness of a film in the eyes of its viewersClick here to returnto LearningObjective SlideClick here to return to KeyAspects of Mise-en-sceneSlide
    28. 28. Glossary of termsMOTIFIn narrative, a motif is any recurring elementthat has symbolic significance in a story.Through its repetition, a motif can help produceother narrative (or literary) aspects such astheme or mood.Click here toreturn to‘Gothic-HorrorSlide’
    29. 29. Glossary of termsCharacterisationCharacterisation : information that is givenabout a characterThis information can be given explicitly (tolddirectly) or implicitly (told indirectly).Click here toreturn to‘Characterisationslide’
    30. 30. Glossary of termsMultimodalMore than oneWay of CommunicatinginformationTherefore, a multimodal text is a text that uses more than one system ofcommunication. Multimodal texts often employ systems of visual, audial andtextual communications, because they (when working together) increaseaudiences level of engagement and interest.Click here to returnto Outline ofAssessment SlideClick here toreturn to LearningObjectives Slide

    ×