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Spanish

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Spanish

  1. 1. Introduction to Spanish: A Pronunciation Guide An interactive presentation By Colleen Duffy Click here to send me an email
  2. 2. Important Note <ul><li>Like English, Spanish is spoken with many different accents. It is important to recognize that these pronunciations may vary slightly from country to country. This version adheres most closely to the Spanish of western Spain. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Introduction to Pronunciation <ul><li>Vowel Sounds </li></ul><ul><li>Consonant Sounds </li></ul><ul><li>Syllables </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul>Quit
  4. 4. Vowel Sounds <ul><li>a – “ah” as in “f a ther” </li></ul><ul><li>e – “eh” as in “d ay ” </li></ul><ul><li>i – “ee” as in “t ee ” </li></ul><ul><li>o – “oh” as in “l ow ” </li></ul><ul><li>u – “oo” as in “t wo ” </li></ul>Quit
  5. 5. Consonant Sounds b-g <ul><li>b – similar to “b” in English, yet spoken more softly, closer to a “v” sound </li></ul><ul><li>c – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>d – similar to English, but slightly softer, somewhere between an English “d” and “th” </li></ul><ul><li>f – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>g – when followed by a consonant, a, o, or u it makes a hard “g” sound as in “gal.” When followed by an i or e it makes a sound like an English “h” </li></ul>Quit
  6. 6. Consonant Sounds h-l <ul><li>h – almost always silent, except for when preceded by a “c,” in which case it makes a “ch” sound just like in English </li></ul><ul><li>j – English “h” sound </li></ul><ul><li>k – “k” is not traditionally part of the Spanish alphabet, but appears in some words borrowed from other languages. If it appears, pronounce it like in English. </li></ul><ul><li>l – same as English </li></ul>Quit
  7. 7. Consonant Sounds l-q <ul><li>ll – the double “l” is considered a distinct letter and is pronounced like an English “y” </li></ul><ul><li>m – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>n – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>ñ – pronounced like the “ny” in “ca ny on” </li></ul><ul><li>p – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>q – pronounced like an English “k.” Ex: “que” is pronounced “kay” </li></ul>Quit
  8. 8. Consonant Sounds r-w <ul><li>r </li></ul><ul><li>s – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>t – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>v – pronounced somewhere between an English “v” and an English “b” </li></ul><ul><li>w - “k” is not traditionally part of the Spanish alphabet, but appears in some words borrowed from other languages. If it appears, pronounce it like in English. </li></ul>Quit
  9. 9. Consonant Sounds x-z <ul><li>x – same as English </li></ul><ul><li>y – pronounced like the Spanish “i” or English “ee” </li></ul><ul><li>z – pronounced like an English “s.” There is no buzz on this letter like there is with the English “z.” </li></ul>Quit
  10. 10. Stressing Syllables 1 <ul><li>In the Spanish language, one syllable per word is stressed more than the others. It’s the same in English, for example, in the word “library” the “li” is the stressed syllable. </li></ul><ul><li>However, the rules for stressing syllables are much simpler in Spanish. </li></ul>Quit
  11. 11. Stressing Syllables 2 <ul><li>If a word ends in -s, -n, or a vowel, the stress falls on the second-to-last syllable. Ex: gato = GAH-toh </li></ul><ul><li>If a word ends in a consonant, the stress falls on the last syllable. Ex. portal = por-TAHL </li></ul>Quit
  12. 12. Strong and Weak Vowels Quit -In Spanish there are two types of vowels: “strong” vowels and “weak” vowels. -A, E, and O are strong vowels. -I and U are weak vowels. -If two strong vowels are next to each other in a word, they will form two distinct syllables. ex: pareo (pah-REH-oh) – 3 syllables -If a strong vowel and a weak vowel are next to each other in a word, they will form one syllable combining the two sounds (a “diphthong”). ex: patio (PAH-tyo) – 2 syllables -If two weak vowels are next to each other in a word, they will form one syllable combining the two sounds.
  13. 13. Accent Marks <ul><li>Accent marks (á, é, í, ó, ú) can fall on any vowel. </li></ul><ul><li>Accent marks mean that the stressed syllable should be the one with the accent, regardless of the rules. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: rápido would normally be pronounced rah-PEE-doh, but because of the accent it is pronounced RAH-pee-doh </li></ul>Quit
  14. 14. Resources <ul><li>Basics: http://spanish.about.com/od/tipsforlearningspanish/u/start.htm#s2 </li></ul><ul><li>The majority of the content in this presentation comes from my own previous knowledge from various Spanish courses. </li></ul><ul><li>Syllables: members.aol.com/alvareze/ spanish /frame.html </li></ul><ul><li>Images: fotosearch.com/royaltyfree </li></ul>Quit

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