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Synchronicity in GamesEduardo Larson
Start• Pong: “There was a beautifully resonant pong  sound, and the ball bounced back to the other side of  the screen” (C...
Why synchronism?• Cognitive studies show that (in Anderson, 1996):   • Infants are more interested in images linked to sou...
Films versus games• Films:   • are fixed.   • are bi-modal.• Video Games:   • are interactive.   • are tri-modal; include ...
Chion’s audiovisual contract• Added value: the expressive and  informative value with which a sound  enriches a given imag...
Example 1• Synchresis rendering physicality or tangibility: simulation, physics games,  etc.       Synchronicity in       ...
Example 2• Synchresis in gameplay: enhanced gameplay.      Synchronicity in         Games
Example 3• Synchresis as sign: provides information and feedback.       Synchronicity in          Games
Example 4• Sync points as structure: molds game progression and builds fiction through  cinematic events.       Synchronic...
Example 5• Synchronicity as gameplay: rhythm and music games.      Synchronicity in         Games
Example 6• Synchronicity as synaesthesia: experience is felt as being moved by  synchronicity.       Synchronicity in     ...
References• Anderson, J. 1996. “Sound and Image”. The Reality of         •   Angry Birds. 2009. Rovio Entertainment  Illus...
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Synchronicity in videogames

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Presentation about audio, visual and kinaesthetic synchronicity in videogames.

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Synchronicity in videogames

  1. 1. Synchronicity in GamesEduardo Larson
  2. 2. Start• Pong: “There was a beautifully resonant pong sound, and the ball bounced back to the other side of the screen” (Cohen, 1984: 28-29).• Space Invaders: adaptive background music.— Why produce synthetic sounds in real-time?— Why adaptive music?— Synchronicity!— Why “beautiful” and “resonant” sounds?— ... Synchronicity in Games
  3. 3. Why synchronism?• Cognitive studies show that (in Anderson, 1996): • Infants are more interested in images linked to sounds; they are perceived as more important. • Infants actively seek for patterns across modalities. • When cross-modal patterns are confirmed the information carried by them is perceived as being generated by a single event.• Film spectators are constantly searching for patterns that bridge modalities (Anderson, 1996).• The synchronized activation of neural patterns are associated to the organization of consciousness and attention (Annabel Cohen, 2010: 893- 894). Synchronicity in Games
  4. 4. Films versus games• Films: • are fixed. • are bi-modal.• Video Games: • are interactive. • are tri-modal; include a “kinaesthetic space” (Stockburger, 2006).• Working definition: Synchronicity will be used whenever audio is perceived as linked to visual and/or kinesthetic events or parameters. Synchronicity in Games
  5. 5. Chion’s audiovisual contract• Added value: the expressive and informative value with which a sound enriches a given image, and vice versa.• Synchresis: the psychological fusion between a sound and a visual when these occur at the same time.• Synch Points: salient synchronized moments of an audiovisual sequence. Synchronicity in Games
  6. 6. Example 1• Synchresis rendering physicality or tangibility: simulation, physics games, etc. Synchronicity in Games
  7. 7. Example 2• Synchresis in gameplay: enhanced gameplay. Synchronicity in Games
  8. 8. Example 3• Synchresis as sign: provides information and feedback. Synchronicity in Games
  9. 9. Example 4• Sync points as structure: molds game progression and builds fiction through cinematic events. Synchronicity in Games
  10. 10. Example 5• Synchronicity as gameplay: rhythm and music games. Synchronicity in Games
  11. 11. Example 6• Synchronicity as synaesthesia: experience is felt as being moved by synchronicity. Synchronicity in Games
  12. 12. References• Anderson, J. 1996. “Sound and Image”. The Reality of • Angry Birds. 2009. Rovio Entertainment Illusion: An Ecological Approach to Cognitive Film Theory. • Child of Eden. 2011. Q Entertainment. pp. 80-89. Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University • F.E.A.R.. 2007. Monolith Productions & Day 1 Studios. Press. • Flower. 2009. Thatgamecompany/Sony Computer Entertainment.• Chion, M. 1994. Audio-vision: sound on screen. • Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock. 2010. Neversoft & Vocarious Translated by Claudia Gorbman. New York: Columbia Visions. University Press. • Lumines: Electronic Symphony. 2012. Q Entertainment.• Cohen, A. 2010. “Music as a source of emotion in film”. • Need for Speed: Underground. 2003. EA Games. Handbook of Music and Emotion: theory, research, • Pac-man Championship Edition DX. 2010. Namco Bandai. applications. Eds. Patrick N. Juslin & John A. Slodoba. • Patapon 3. 2011. Pyramid Studio. pp. 879-908. Chapter 31. Oxford University Press. • Peggle. 2007. PopCap Games.• Cohen, S. 1984. ZAP! The Rise and Fall of Atari. New • Pong. 1972. Atari. York: Mcgraw - Hill Book Company. • Resident Evil 5. 2009. Capcom.• Juul, J. 2010. A casual revolution: reinventing video • Rez. 2001. United Game Artists & Q Entertainment. games and their players. Cambridge: The MIT Press. • Rhythm Heaven. 2009. Nintendo.• Stockburger, A. 2006. The Rendered Arena: modalities of • Space Invaders. 1978. Taito. space in video and computer games. Doctoral Thesis. • Space Fever. 1979. Nintendo. Degree awarded by the University of the Arts, London. • Street Fighter 4. 2008. Capcom.• Swink, S. 2009. Game Feel: a game designer’s guide to • Super Mario Bros. 1985. Nintendo. virtual sensation. Burlington: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. • World of Goo. 2008. 2D Boy. Synchronicity in Games

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