Introduction      1                                                                                                       ...
Ireland’s status in WWII      1                                                                                           ...
List of fatalities     1                                                                                A memorial park to...
Newspapers and archivesThe North Strand Bombing caused shock and revulsion,              1as revealed in contemporary news...
North Strand Bombing Exhibition
North Strand Bombing Exhibition
North Strand Bombing Exhibition
North Strand Bombing Exhibition
North Strand Bombing Exhibition
North Strand Bombing Exhibition
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North Strand Bombing Exhibition

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On the night of 31 May 1941, four high-explosive bombs were dropped by German aircraft on the North Strand area of Dublin City. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. Charleville Mall Public Library was designated as the headquarters for the bombed area and City Architect Horace O’Rourke was in charge of the clearance project.

The photographs which make up this exhibition were commissioned by Dublin Corporation as evidence for the assessment of insurance claims. The work was entrusted to a local photographer, H. McCrae, of 152 Clontarf Road, who began work on 4 June and the final photographs were taken on 31 October, at a total cost of £79-10s-0d.

See also http://northstrandbombing.wordpress.com

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North Strand Bombing Exhibition

  1. 1. Introduction 1 The North Strand Bombing was the most serious atrocity inflicted on neutral Eire during the Second World War. On the night of 31 May 1941, four high-explosive bombs were dropped by German aircraft on the North Strand area of Dublin City. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. The tragedy has resonated with Irish people ever since, and especially in Dublin, where it has passed into the collective community memory. This exhibition commemorates this iconic event in the life of the city and is intended as a tribute to those killed and injured on that fateful night in 1941. 4 Then ther e was th 3 was going e time I to be kill thought night of ed I the bombi . That was the Strand. It ng of th1. 23 Rutland Place (Car ZA 7373 owned by Vincent Duffy, 8 Mount Brown, Old Kilmainham). Dublin City Library & Archive was not e North2. 153-164 North Strand Road. Dublin City Library & Archive father’s long after death. I my3. Appointment of Gerard Earley as Deputy Area Warden. Earley Family Collection, Dublin City Library & Archive mother t was in be hat nigh d with m4. Oral testimony about the bombing by local resident Chrissie O’Brien. North Inner City Folklore Project planes co t w y5. Inspecting a bomb crater. North Inner City Folklore Project ming over hen we heard th big guns . Then w e that wer e heard down nea e located the r the P somewher firing at oint Dep e the plan ot. They 2 going over es as th were . The pla ey were flying ve nes must ry low be have been what I ca cause we n only des could hea gears of cribe as r a car ja like the heard th mming, t e whistli hen we big explo ng sound sions... s, then t he 5
  2. 2. Ireland’s status in WWII 1 In 1937, the Irish Free State was re-constituted as Eire. The country remained neutral during World War II but a ‘national emergency’ was declared. In Ireland, the period from 1939 to 1945 has been known ever since as ‘The Emergency’. Nazi Germany inflicted a series of aircraft bombings along the east coast, beginning in county Wexford in August 1940, and ending with the North Strand. On 19 June 1941, the Eire government announced that the Nazis had expressed regret for the North Strand bombing and had promised compensation. 41. 13-16 North Strand Road. Dublin City Library & Archive2. Local Defence Forces during The Emergency. North Inner City Folklore Project 3. Irish neutrality during Word War II. Courtesy Irish Press plc 24. Air Raid Warden’s Helmet. Earley Family Collection, Dublin City Library & Archive5. Extract from Neutrality (War Damage to Property) Act, 1941. 5 3
  3. 3. List of fatalities 1 A memorial park to the victims of the attack is now located near the Five Lamps. Elizabeth Behan (21), Desmond Fitzpatrick (5), 72 Shelmalier Road. 156 North Strand Road. Mary Boyle (27), James Fitzpatrick (3 months), 157 North Strand Road. 156 North Strand Road. Mary Browne (67), Richard Fitzpatrick (60), 25 North Strand Road. 23 North Strand Road. Henry Browne (37), Ellen Fitzpatrick (55), son of Mary Browne, wife of Richard Fitzpatrick, 25 North Strand Road. 29 North Strand Road. Mary Browne (33), Margaret (Madge) Fitzpatrick (32), wife of Henry Browne, 23 North Strand Road. 25 North Strand Road. Noel Fitzpatrick (32), Maureen Browne (7), 23 North Strand Road. 25 North Strand Road. John Foran (52), Nan Browne (5), 155 North Strand Road. 25 North Strand Road. Mary Foran (49), Edward Browne (4), wife of John Foran, 25 North Strand Road. 155 North Strand Road. Angela Browne (3), Marianne Houlton (65),1. The funeral cortege. Front page The Irish Press 6 June 1941. 25 North Strand Road. 156 North Strand.2. 2-4 Dunne Street. Dublin City Library & Archive3. The Irish Press, p. 3, 2 June 1941. Patrick Callely (54), Patrick McLoughlin (28),4. Fragment of bomb which fell on North Strand Charleville Mall Public Library. 162 North Strand. 41 Summerhill Parade. Thomas Carroll (55), William McLoughlin (2), 157 North Strand Road. 41 Summerhill Parade. 2 Elizabeth Daly (60), Annie Malone (79), 162 North Strand. 43 Summerhill Parade. Josephine Fagan (33), John Murray (55), 157 North Strand Road. 154 North Strand Road. Alice Fitzpatrick (38), Charles Sweeney (61), 156 North Strand Road. 11 North Strand Road. Source: Dublin City Coroner’s Report, 1941, pp 90 – 98. 4 3
  4. 4. Newspapers and archivesThe North Strand Bombing caused shock and revulsion, 1as revealed in contemporary newspapers and documents.The Irish Red Cross provided emergency shelter atthe Mansion House and in parish halls throughout thecity. Charleville Mall Public Library was designated asheadquarters for the bombed area. Damaged houseswere repaired where possible, and those made homelessby the bombing were re-located to Dublin Corporation’snew housing estates at Cabra and Crumlin.2 1. 12, 13 and 13a North Strand. Dublin City Library & Archive 2. Headlines from The Irish Press, 1 June 1941. Courtesy, Irish Press plc 3. Firefighting at North Strand. The Irish Press, 1 June 1941. Courtesy, Irish Press plc 4. Headlines from The Irish Press June 1941. Courtesy, Irish Press plc 5. Gas mask. Earley Family Collection, Dublin City Library & Archive 4 3 5

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